New College


Faculty List

Associate Professors  
F. Garrett, MA, PhD (Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health/Religion)

Associate Professors, Teaching Stream
A. McGuire, BA (Hons), MA, PhD (Critical Studies in Equity and Solidarity)
A. Wasike, BA, MA, MEd, PhD (New College/African Studies Centre)

Associate Professors, Teaching Stream (Part-Time)
A. Guerson, PhD (International Foundation Program/New One)

Assistant Professors, Teaching Stream
C. Desai, PhD (Critical Studies in Equity and Solidarity)
S. Doyle-Wood, BA, MA, PhD (Critical Studies in Equity and Solidarity/Transitional Year Programme)
K. Edmonds, BA (Hons), MA, PhD (Community Engaged Learning/Caribbean Studies Centre)
M. A. El Waer, BA (Hons), MA (Sociology/Critical Studies in Equity and Solidarity)
M. Prescott-Brown, BA (Hons), MA, PhD (Writing Centre)

Assistant Professors, Teaching Stream (Part-Time)
R. Buiani, PhD (New One)
M. Levin, BA, MSc, PhD (New College/African Studies Centre)
C. Ramsaroop, BA (Hons), MEd (Critical Studies in Equity and Solidarity/New One)
E. Weisbaum, BFA, MES, PhD (Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health)

Introduction

New College courses have in common a commitment to socially engaged learning and to explorative and inventive pedagogy that widens students’ experience by critically examining relationships among academic disciplines. We offer two degree programs: Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health; and Critical Studies in Equity and Solidarity. These programs are open to all students in the Faculty of Arts and Science.

We also offer interdisciplinary courses that can enhance any degree program. Integration of student experience is a major priority in a college with students from all faculties in the University. The Independent Studies courses provide an opportunity for students to design their own programs and to test their research, analytic, synthetic, and creative skills by writing a major research paper. The Community Engaged Learning program supports course-based service learning and independent community engaged learning opportunities. These allow students to integrate their theoretical knowledge with practical experience, while engaging in meaningful work in campus and community organizations.

Contact:

Program Administrator's Office:
New College, Room 133 (416-978-5404 or nc.undergradadmin@utoronto.ca)

New One:
new.one@utoronto.ca

Registrar’s Office:
New College, Room 107 (416-978-2460)

New One: Learning Without Borders

New One provides first year students with a comprehensive foundation for successful undergraduate study. It encourages active, engaged learning and creative forms of inquiry, and supports students in developing their research, writing and oral communication abilities. In New One, students develop skills in research and knowledge presentation, showcasing their projects at our Knowledge Fair.

New One offers up to ten interdisciplinary small-class seminars annually. Students join the program by simply registering in one of our courses, whether in the Fall or Winter term. The courses explore themes that connect to our daily lives such as the food we eat, the languages we speak, the technology we use, the art that we create and surrounds us, and the science that impacts our lives. We encourage students to take a course in both the Fall and Winter terms for a more complete experience.

New One gives students the tools to think deeply, critically, and creatively and to see the ways our lives are connected "beyond borders." Inspired by the social advocacy focus of New College's academic programs, the program grapples with the core question: how do we imagine responsible global citizenship and build a more equitable and just society?

New One courses meet for 3 hours each week. The first two hours are usually dedicated to course content, while the third hour is allocated to "Learning Labs." All students come together in these Learning Labs to engage in joint activities and explore issues that are common to the themes of the courses. Both in seminars and Learning Labs, students will experience a variety of ways of learning (through, for example, guest lectures, group work, workshops, field trips to local community organizations, and panels of senior students sharing their experience and insights).

New One does not require a specific application. All first-year students in the Faculty of Arts and Science on the St. George campus are eligible to register in our courses. Students, however, can only take courses in one College One program in the same term. For more information about the program, go to http://uoft.me/NewOne or contact new.one@utoronto.ca.

The Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health Program

(Minor) The Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health (BPMH) Program is an interdisciplinary undergraduate Minor that allows students to choose from a wide range of courses in Buddhist Studies, cognitive science, medical anthropology, psychology of religion, health psychology, and sociological analyses of physical and mental health. With this training, students acquire an understanding of how Buddhist traditions have interacted with and contributed to global and diverse understandings of consciousness, mental health and distress, and determinants of health. Students study global and diverse models of mental health and well-being through a self-reflective, meta-cognitive, and phenomenological study of Buddhism and health in contexts of relational, intersectional, and global interconnections.

Consult Acting Program Director, Dr. Eleanor Weisbaum via email at elli.weisbaum@utoronto.ca. For general enquiries, call 416-978-5404 or email nc.undergradadmin@utoronto.ca.

Critical Studies in Equity and Solidarity

(Major, Minor) Critical Studies in Equity and Solidarity (CSES) is an interdisciplinary program that explores how social relations and practices of power and privilege are (re)produced locally and transnationally. In CSES we question the dominant conceptualization of equity by the state, educational programs, the non-profit sectors and community organizations as individualized and de-historicized social differences. CSES is a hub of critical disability studies teaching and learning. The program provides students with theoretical and practical tools to study social, political, economic and historical injustices. CSES takes a unique approach to undergraduate education that values student experiential learning and community knowledge. The learning goal of CSES is to provide frameworks on theories of transformative social change rooted in political activism and formations of solidarity. The program encourages students to apply theory in action through organizing and practicing solidarity in making a more just world. CSES creates a dynamic learning environment that extends far beyond the university walls. With a vibrant student body, dynamic faculty members, connection with a wide range of community partners and a bold curriculum, CSES at New College is a leader in studies of social justice, settler colonialism, race, gender, sexuality, disability, land/water and sustainability, activism, solidarity and the art of resistance, and global food equity and security.

Consult Program Director, Professor A. McGuire, 416-978-0829 or email cses.director@utoronto.ca. For general enquiries, call 416-978-5404 or email nc.undergradadmin@utoronto.ca.

Community Engaged Learning (CEL)

New College offers several community engaged courses. These provide students the opportunity to integrate academic, experiential and practice-based learning as they participate in meaningful work in community or campus organizations.

Two forms of community engaged learning courses are offered: embedded and independent. In the former, a community service component is either a mandatory or optional component of the course syllabus. (Examples of such courses are CSE342H1 and BPM232H1). In the independent community engaged learning courses, upper level students, with various academic backgrounds, are placed with a social purpose community or campus-based organization for several hours per week, contributing to the mission of that organization in program support work or research. Through seminar discussions and critical reflection on their experiences, students learn how to mobilize their academic knowledge, deepen their appreciation of community engagement and social justice, explore social and ethical issues, and build professional dispositions and work-place skills relevant to the social sector.

Information about CEL can be found at https://www.newcollege.utoronto.ca/programs/cel/.

Enquiries: nc.engagedlearning@utoronto.ca.

Independent Studies

New College Independent Study courses are designed both to complement regular offerings in New College Programs and to provide an opportunity for New College students in any program to enrich their studies. The normal expectation of a project course is that the student, aided and advised by their supervisor, will read relevant literature, and plan, analyze and report on an original and independent investigation of an appropriate topic. Written applications, including a detailed proposal, should be made through the Programs Office for approval by the Vice Principal of New College or a designate by April 15 for the Summer Session; by July 15 for the Fall Term; or by November 15 for the Winter Term. Should the deadline fall on a weekend, applications will be accepted until the following Monday. Students will be notified of the acceptance or rejection of an application. If the project requires ethics approval, please be advised that you should find and consult with a supervisor about meeting this requirement at least a semester in advance of these deadlines. For more information and application forms, please see the Independent Studies website: https://www.newcollege.utoronto.ca/independent-studies/.

Enquiries: New College Program Administrator - Wetmore Hall, room 133; nc.undergradadmin@utoronto.ca or 416-978-5404.

Interdisciplinary Courses on Jungian Theory

This suite of courses offers students opportunities for sustained, interdisciplinary engagement with the thought of Carl Jung. Courses invite students to consider Jung's thought and practice in relation to a range of disciplinary and cultural issues in order to open up conversations about models of consciousness and mind.

Enquiries: New College Program Administrator - Wetmore Hall, room 133; nc.undergradadmin@utoronto.ca or 416-978-5404.

International Foundation Program

This program is designed for international students who need to meet the University's English language requirement. The program is offered to students in the Faculties of Arts and Science, Music, and the Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design. The program consists of five courses that are designed to develop students’ language and critical skills through the modalities of reading, writing, listening, and speaking as well as develop students’ academic literacy in a course related to their admitted program of study. The program approaches language development from a social perspective and language learning is situated within authentic academic contexts. Students learn to master foundational academic skills such as research and digital literacy, time management, exam, and study skills. Students take a history course, Themes in World History, which applies critical skills that have been scaffolded in the language courses (e.g., paraphrasing, summarizing, citing sources, etc.). In the history course, students learn how to understand the relationship of human beings and their environment, cross-cultural and gender relations, and how global patterns affect local developments making students better able to assess the historical context of challenges society faces today.

Core courses include one first-year history credit course (IFP100Y1), three non-credit language courses and one non-credit discipline-specific course. Courses are open only to students admitted to the program. For program and admission information, please see https://internationalprograms.utoronto.ca.

The African Studies Program

(Specialist, Major, Minor) provides students unique opportunities to study the complexity and dynamism of African societies, the dynamics processes of socio-economic, cultural, environmental, and political transformations in Africa, the varied histories, ideas and institutions of Africa and its diasporas through interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary lenses. It fosters a vibrant intellectual, social and cultural hub of academic excellence with a shared ethos and commitment to public scholarship, social justice, global citizenship, engaged scholarship and a praxis of inclusivity, epistemic diversity, and reflexive community engagement.

Effective July 1, 2023, the administration of the existing undergraduate programs and courses in African Studies has been moved from New College to the new African Studies Centre. See the African Studies section of the Calendar for a complete listing of programs and courses.

The Caribbean Studies Program

(Specialist, Major, Minor) offers a combined interdisciplinary and area studies approach to examining a wide range of issues including gender, religion, culture, ethnicity, race, development, language, colonialism, the environment and regional common markets.

Effective July 1, 2022, the administration of the existing undergraduate programs and courses in Caribbean Studies has been moved from New College to the new Centre for Caribbean Studies. See the Caribbean Studies section of the Calendar for a complete listing of programs and courses.

The Human Biology Programs

These programs offer a broad education in life sciences with courses offered by departments in both the Faculty of Arts & Science, and the Temerty Faculty of Medicine (see the Human Biology section of the Calendar.)

The Women and Gender Studies Program

(Specialist, Major, Minor) provides an interdisciplinary and culturally inclusive approach to understanding gender (see the Women and Gender Studies section of the Calendar.)

New College Programs

Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health Minor (Arts Program) - ASMIN1017

Enrolment Requirements:

Enrolment in the Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health Minor will be administratively suspended as of January 31, 2024 and students will no longer be able to enrol in the program. Students presently enrolled in the Minor will be able to complete the program requirements as described below. Students who are not enrolled in this Minor but are interested in related disciplines are strongly recommended to consult the Anthropology, Cognitive Science (University College), Psychology, and Religion sections of the Academic Calendar for program options.

Completion Requirements:

Consult Program Administrator: nc.undergradadmin@utoronto.ca or 416-978-5404.

(4.0 credits, including 1.0 credit at the 300+ level)

First Year:
No specific first-year courses required.

Higher Years:
1. BPM232H1
2. 2.0 credits from the Core Group: BPM100H1, BPM214H1, BPM330H1, BPM332H1, BPM333H1, BPM334H1, BPM335H1, BPM336H1, BPM337H1, BPM338H1, BPM339H1, BPM430H1, BPM432H1, BPM433H1, BPM438H1, BPM499H1
3. 1.5 credits from Group A

Group A:
ANT100Y1, ANT204H1, ANT207H1, ANT253H1, ANT348H1, ANT356H1, ANT368H1, CAR316H1, COG250Y1, COG341H1, COG342H1, EAS241H1, EAS346H1, EAS361H1, EAS393H1, EAS393Y1, EAS414H1, ETH201H1, ETH220H1, ETH230H1, FAH260H1, HIS280Y1, HIS282Y1, HIS489H1, HMB300H1, HMB434H1, HPS100H1, HPS110H1, HPS200H1, HPS250H1, HPS352H1, HST209H1, HST305H1, HST306H1, INS300Y1, INS340Y1, JAR301H1, JFP450H1, JSR312H1, NEW302Y1, NEW303H1, PHL100Y1, PHL200Y1, PHL201H1, PHL217H1, PHL232H1, PHL235H1, PHL237H1, PHL240H1, PHL243H1, PHL244H1, PHL275H1, PHL281H1, PHL302H1, PHL310H1, PHL311H1, PHL319H1, PHL320H1, PHL331H1, PHL332H1, PHL335H1, PHL340H1, PHL341H1, PHL344H1, PHL375H1, PHL376H1, PHL382H1, PHL383H1, PHL404H1, PHL405H1, PHL406H1, PHL407H1, PHL414H1, PHL415H1/​ PHL455H1, PHL478H1, PHL479H1, PSY100H1, PSY210H1, PSY220H1, PSY230H1, PSY240H1, PSY260H1, PSY270H1, PSY280H1, PSY311H1, PSY312H1, PSY313H1, PSY321H1, PSY326H1, PSY331H1, PSY333H1, PSY336H1, PSY337H1, PSY341H1, PSY342H1, PSY343H1, PSY370H1, PSY371H1, PSY414H1, PSY425H1, PSY426H1, PSY434H1, PSY435H1, PSY450H1, PSY473H1, PSY493H1, RLG100H1, RLG101H1, RLG106H1, RLG200H1, RLG206H1, RLG209H1, RLG210Y1, RLG211H1, RLG212H1, RLG235H1, RLG301H1, RLG303H1, RLG304H1, RLG309H1, RLG311H1, RLG317H1, RLG318H1, RLG319H1, RLG371H1, RLG372H1, RLG373H1, RLG374H1, RLG376H1, RLG387H1, RLG407H1, RLG421H1, RLG426H1, RLG462H1, RLG463H1, RLG464H1, RLG465H1, RLG469Y1, RLG470H1, RLG478H1, RLG479H1, SOC243H1, SOC250Y1, SOC363H1, SOC448H1, SOC483H1, VIC106H1, VIC206H1

Note: Effective Fall 2021, courses associated with New College's Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health, Caribbean Studies, and Critical Studies in Equity and Solidarity programs will have the new "BPM," "CAR," and "CSE" designators respectively.

Critical Studies in Equity and Solidarity Major (Arts Program) - ASMAJ1141

Critical Studies in Equity and Solidarity (CSES) is an interdisciplinary program that explores how social relations and practices of power and privilege are (re)produced locally and transnationally. In CSES we question the dominant conceptualization of equity by the state, educational programs, the non-profit sectors and community organizations as individualized and de-historicized social differences. CSES is a hub of critical disability studies teaching and learning. The program provides students with theoretical and practical tools to study social, political, economic and historical injustices. CSES takes a unique approach to undergraduate education that values student experiential learning and community knowledge. The learning goal of CSES is to provide frameworks on theories of transformative social change rooted in political activism and formations of solidarity. The program encourages students to apply theory in action through organizing and practicing solidarity in making a more just world. Equity Studies creates a dynamic learning environment that extends far beyond the university walls. With a vibrant student body, dynamic faculty members, connection with a wide range of community partners and a bold curriculum, CSES at New College is a leader in studies of social justice, settler colonialism, race, gender, sexuality, disability, land/water and sustainability, activism, solidarity and the art of resistance, and global food equity and security.

Enrolment Requirements:

This is an open enrolment program. A student who has completed 4.0 credits may enrol in the program.

Completion Requirements:

Consult Program Administrator: nc.undergradadmin@utoronto.ca or 416-978-5404.

(7.0 credits, including 2.0 credits at the 300+ level)

First Year:
No specific first-year courses required.

Higher Years:
1. CSE240H1
2. CSE341H1
3. JQR360H1
4. 2.0 additional credits from the core group, including at least 0.5 at the 400-level: JNS450H1, CAR315H1, CSE241Y1, CSE270H1, CSE340H1, CSE342H1, CSE344H1, CSE344Y1, CSE345H1, CSE346H1, CSE347H1, CSE348H1, CSE349H1, CSE439H1, CSE440Y1, CSE441H1, CSE442H1, CSE443H1, CSE444H1, CSE445H1, CSE446H1, CSE447H1, CSE448H1, CSE449H1, CSE469Y1, CSE499H1
5. 3.5 credits from Groups A, B, C, D (including one or more credits from at least three of the four groups)

Group A: Gender
ANT343H1, ANT460H1, CAR317H1, CAR325H1, CAS360H1, CHC322H1, CLA219H1, CLA319H1, EAS380H1, EAS388H1, ENG355Y1, FRE304H1, GGR320H1, GGR327H1, HIS205H1, HIS297Y1, HIS348H1, HIS363H1, HIS383Y1, HIS406H1, HIS446H1, HIS481H1, ITA455H1, JAL355H1, NMC245H1, NMC284H1, NMC484H1, PHL367H1, POL303H1, POL351H1, POL432H1, REN341H1, REN342H1, REN343H1, RLG235H1, RLG311H1, RLG312H1, RLG313H1, SLA248H1, SOC265H1, SOC365H1, SOC383H1, SOC465H1, SPA382H1, WGS160Y1, WGS260H1, WGS271Y1, WGS273H1, WGS367H1, WGS372H1, WGS373H1

Group B: Race, Anti-Racism and Ethnicity
AFR150Y1, AFR250Y1, AFR322H1, AFR351Y1, AFR352H1, AMS310H1, ANT204H1, ANT458H1, ANT463H1, ANT464H1, CAR225H1, CAR226H1, CAR324H1, CAR328H1, CAS310H1, CAR427H1, CAR429H1, CDN280H1, CDN307H1, CDN335H1, CIN337H1, ENG270H1, ENG355Y1, ENG356Y1, ENG367H1, ENG368H1, ENG369H1, ENG370Y1, FAH351H1, FIN320H1, FRE336H1, GGR240H1, HIS107Y1, HIS208Y1, HIS221H1, HIS222H1, HIS230H1, HIS231H1, HIS245H1, HIS282Y1, HIS297Y1, HIS303H1, HIS338H1, HIS359H1, HIS360H1, HIS361H1, HIS391Y1, HIS392Y1, HIS413H1, HIS416H1, HIS467H1, HIS470H1, HIS474H1, JHN323H1, JLN327H1, INS261H1, LAS301H1, LAS302H1, LAS401H1, NMC484H1, POL467H1, RLG344H1, RLG352H1, RLG353H1, SLA222H1, SOC210H1, SPA486H1, UNI199H1, WGS481H1, WGS390H1, WGS442H1

Group C: Sexual Diversities
ANT441H1, ANT456H1, EAS389H1, ENG273Y1, ENG384Y1, JPS315H1, JSU325H1, NMC384H1, PHL243H1, PSY323H1, RLG313H1, SDS199H1, SDS246H1, SDS255H1, SDS256H1, SDS279H1, SDS345H1, SDS355H1, SDS365H1, SDS377H1, SDS378H1, SDS380H1, SDS381H1, SDS382H1, SDS385H1, SDS455H1, SDS465H1, SDS470H1, UNI104H1, WGS374H1, WGS376H1

Group D: General Critical Equity
AFR298H1, AFR370H1, AFR454H1, ANT204H1, ANT205H1, ANT324H1, ANT327H1, ANT329H1, ANT346H1, ANT348H1, ANT358H1, ANT364H1, ANT366H1, ANT420H1, ANT426H1, ANT472H1, ANT474H1, BPM214H1, CAR220H1, CAR221H1, CAS350H1, CAS420H1, CDN267H1, CDN367H1, CRI487H1, DTS200Y1, DTS401H1, DTS402H1, EAS315H1, EAS439H1, EDS260H1, ENG254H1, ENV430H1, GGR107H1, GGR112H1, GGR240H1, GGR328H1, GGR329H1, GGR338H1, GGR339H1, GGR357H1, GGR363H1, GGR418H1, GGR419H1, GGR434H1, HIS106Y1, HIS318H1, HIS323H1, HIS324H1, HIS424H1, HIS459H1, HIS480H1, HIS489H1, HMB203H1, HMB303H1, HMB443H1, HPS240H1, HPS324H1, HST330H1, HST411H1, INS200H1, INS201Y1, INS240Y1, INS250H1, INS261H1, INS300Y1, INS301Y1, INS302H1, INS322H1, INS340Y1, INS341H1, INS350H1, INS353H1, INS354H1, INS360Y1, INS402H1, INS403H1, INS405H1, JFP450H1, JGU216H1, JNH350H1, JSU237H1, JUG325H1, LIN211H1, NMC384H1, PHL273H1, PHL281H1, PHL380H1, PHL383H1, PHL384H1, POL198H1, POL201H1, POL344H1, POL353H1, POL358H1, POL412H1, POL418H1, POL421H1, POL439H1, POL480H1, RLG201H1, RLG317H1, SAS318H1, SOC207H1, SOC220H1, SOC282H1, SOC309H1, SOC363H1, SOC364H1, SOC367H1, SOC479H1, SPA383H1, UNI101H1, URB333H1

Critical Studies in Equity and Solidarity Minor (Arts Program) - ASMIN1141

Critical Studies in Equity and Solidarity (CSES) is an interdisciplinary program that explores how social relations and practices of power and privilege are (re)produced locally and transnationally. In CSES we question the dominant conceptualization of equity by the state, educational programs, the non-profit sectors and community organizations as individualized and de-historicized social differences. CSES is a hub of critical disability studies teaching and learning. The program provides students with theoretical and practical tools to study social, political, economic and historical injustices. CSES takes a unique approach to undergraduate education that values student experiential learning and community knowledge. The learning goal of CSES is to provide frameworks on theories of transformative social change rooted in political activism and formations of solidarity. The program encourages students to apply theory in action through organizing and practicing solidarity in making a more just world. Equity Studies creates a dynamic learning environment that extends far beyond the university walls. With a vibrant student body, dynamic faculty members, connection with a wide range of community partners and a bold curriculum, CSES at New College is a leader in studies of social justice, settler colonialism, race, gender, sexuality, disability, land/water and sustainability, activism, solidarity and the art of resistance, and global food equity and security.

Enrolment Requirements:

This is an open enrolment program. A student who has completed 4.0 credits may enrol in the program.

Completion Requirements:

Consult Program Administrator: nc.undergradadmin@utoronto.ca or 416-978-5404.

(4.0 credits, including at least 1.0 credit at the 300+ level)

First Year:
No specific first-year courses required.

Higher Years:
1. CSE240H1
2. 1.0 credit in any area from the Core Group: JNS450H1, CAR315H1, CSE241Y1, CSE270H1, CSE340H1, CSE341H1, CSE342H1, CSE344H1, CSE344Y1, CSE345H1, CSE346H1, CSE347H1, CSE348H1, CSE349H1, CSE439H1, CSE440Y1, CSE441H1, CSE442H1, CSE443H1, CSE444H1, CSE445H1, CSE446H1, CSE447H1, CSE448H1, CSE449H1, CSE469Y1, CSE499H1
3. 1.5 additional credits in any area from the Core Group, or 1.5 credits from Groups A, B, C, D
4. An additional 1.0 credit from Groups A, B, C, D

Group A: Gender
ANT343H1, ANT460H1, CAR317H1, CAR325H1, CAS360H1, CHC322H1, CLA219H1, CLA319H1, EAS380H1, EAS388H1, ENG355Y1, FRE304H1, GGR320H1, GGR327H1, HIS202H1, HIS205H1, HIS297Y1, HIS348H1, HIS354H1, HIS363H1, HIS383Y1, HIS406H1, HIS417Y1, HIS446H1, HIS465Y1, HIS481H1, HIS486H1, ITA455H1, JAL355H1, NMC245H1, NMC284H1, NMC484H1, PHL367H1, POL303H1, POL351H1, POL432H1, POL450H1, REN341H1, REN342H1, REN343H1, RLG235H1, RLG311H1, RLG312H1, RLG313H1, SLA248H1, SOC265H1, SOC365H1, SOC366H1, SOC383H1, SOC465H1, SPA382H1, WGS160Y1, WGS260H1, WGS271Y1, WGS273H1, WGS367H1, WGS372H1, WGS373H1

Group B: Race, Anti-Racism and Ethnicity
AFR150Y1, AFR250Y1, AFR322H1, AFR351Y1, AFR352H1, AFR453Y1, ANT204H1, ANT458H1, CAR225H1, CAR226H1, CAR324H1, CAR328H1, CAS310H1, CAR429H1, CDN230H1, CDN280H1, CDN307H1, CDN335H1, ENG270H1, ENG355Y1, ENG356Y1, ENG367H1, ENG368H1, ENG369H1, ENG370Y1, FIN320H1, FRE336H1, GGR240H1, HIS107Y1, HIS208Y1, HIS221H1, HIS222H1, HIS230H1, HIS231H1, HIS245H1, HIS282Y1, HIS297Y1, HIS303H1, HIS338H1, HIS359H1, HIS360H1, HIS361H1, HIS391Y1, HIS392Y1, HIS402H1, HIS413H1, HIS416H1, HIS467H1, HIS470H1, HIS474H1, JHN323H1, JLN327H1, INS261H1, LAS301H1, LAS302H1, LAS401H1, NMC484H1, POL301Y1, POL467H1, RLG344H1, RLG352H1, RLG353H1, SLA222H1, SOC210H1, SPA486H1

Group C: Sexual Diversities
ANT441H1, ANT456H1, ENG273Y1, ENG384Y1, JPS315H1, JSU325H1, NMC384H1, PHL243H1, PSY323H1, RLG313H1, SDS255H1, SDS256H1, SDS345H1, SDS346H1, SDS354H1, SDS355H1, SDS365H1, SDS377H1, SDS378H1, SDS380H1, SDS381H1, SDS382H1, SDS455H1, SDS470H1, SDS475H1, UNI104H1, WGS374H1, WGS376H1

Group D: General Critical Equity
ANT204H1, ANT324H1, ANT327H1, ANT329H1, ANT346H1, ANT348H1, ANT358H1, ANT364H1, ANT366H1, ANT388H1, ANT420H1, ANT426H1, ANT472H1, ANT474H1, ARC233H1, BPM214H1, CAS350H1, CAS420H1, CDN267H1, CDN367H1, CRI487H1, DTS200Y1, DTS401H1, DTS402H1, EAS315H1, EAS439H1, EDS260H1, ENG254H1, ENV430H1, GGR107H1, GGR112H1, GGR240H1, GGR241H1, GGR328H1, GGR329H1, GGR338H1, GGR339H1, GGR357H1, GGR363H1, GGR418H1, GGR419H1, GGR420H1, GGR434H1, GGR452H1, GGR457H1, HAJ453H1, HIS106Y1, HIS318H1, HIS323H1, HIS366H1, HIS369H1, HIS424H1, HIS459H1, HIS472H1, HIS480H1, HIS489H1, HMB203H1, HMB303H1, HMB443H1, HPS324H1, HST330H1, HST411H1, INS200H1, INS201Y1, INS240Y1, INS250H1, INS261H1, INS300Y1, INS301Y1, INS302H1, INS322H1, INS340Y1, INS341H1, INS350H1, INS351Y1, INS353H1, INS354H1, INS360Y1, INS402H1, INS403H1, INS405H1, JFP450H1, JGI216H1/​ JGU216H1, JNH350H1, JSU237H1, JUG325H1, NMC384H1, PHL273H1, PHL281H1, PHL380H1, PHL383H1, PHL384H1, POL198H1, POL201H1, POL344H1, POL353H1, POL358H1, POL412H1, POL418H1, POL421H1, POL439H1, POL480H1, RLG201H1, RLG317H1, SAS318H1, SOC207H1, SOC220H1, SOC282H1, SOC309H1, SOC363H1, SOC364H1, SOC367H1, SOC479H1, UNI101H1

Notes:

  • Effective Fall 2021, courses associated with New College programs will have new three-letter designators based on the area of study: "AFR" (African Studies), "BPM" (Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health), "CAR" (Caribbean Studies), and "CSE" (Critical Studies in Equity and Solidarity).
  • Effective Fall 2021, courses associated with St. Michael's College's Christianity and Culture program will have the new "CHC" designator. In addition, courses associated with Victoria College's Renaissance Studies and Education and Society programs will have the new "REN" and "EDS" designators respectively.

New College Courses

New College First-Year Foundations

NEW197H1 - Public Intellectual Activism: Theory and Practice

NEW197H1 - Public Intellectual Activism: Theory and Practice
Hours: 24S

Explores the role of the public intellectual in modern and contemporary societies from a theoretical and practical lens. Specifically, investigates the interventions of this capital actor of the social fabric in specific historical junctures of the 20th century and the new millennium with the idea of informing a hands-on approach to participation in civil society debates. Students will be encouraged to examine how “marginalized communities” intervene in the public sphere to effect social change. Term work will include the writing and publishing of an op-ed article, blog, social media posts and a podcast interview. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW198H1 - Myths of French Sensuality

NEW198H1 - Myths of French Sensuality
Hours: 24S

A study of French cultural history with respect to the French reputation for the indulgence and refinement of all the senses in visual arts, music, cuisine, perfume and fashion. Supporting mythologies are investigated, along with stereotype formation, exoticism and cultural appropriation. Through various research, writing and presentation techniques, including mini-essays, poster displays and pecha kucha, students will explore what is left of this reputation in an era of globalization. No knowledge of French is necessary. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NEW199H1 - We Are What We Eat: The Example of French Cuisine

NEW199H1 - We Are What We Eat: The Example of French Cuisine
Hours: 24S

The historical study of French cuisine reveals a culture rich in controversy and conflicting narratives. These include contested origins, court intrigues, sensual delight, revolutions, colonialism and slavery, controversial farm practices, haute cuisine, cuisine bourgeoise, regionalism, European regulation. Through various research, writing and presentation techniques, including mini-essays, wikis and pecha kucha, students will explore what is left of French food culture in an era of globalization. No knowledge of French is necessary. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

New One: Learning Without Borders

NEW101H1 - The Everyday Politics of Food

NEW101H1 - The Everyday Politics of Food
Hours: 12L/24S

How often do we reflect on the environmental, social and economic impact of our everyday food choices? This course offers an introduction to the key concepts, terms and theories that underlie our current food system. The course links the food we eat to global forces and considers how these forces affect food distribution, access and consumption. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW102H1 - Exploring Multilingual Toronto

NEW102H1 - Exploring Multilingual Toronto
Hours: 12L/24S

How does language connect and divide people, places and communities? This course considers how interactions between people in Toronto are shaped by language as well as history, economy, architecture and urban landscapes. Students engage with the city both in and out of class to think about a range of questions linked to gender and sexuality, indigeneity, migration, race, ethnicity, and public/private space. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW103H1 - Digital Technology and Society

NEW103H1 - Digital Technology and Society
Hours: 12L/24S

While the internet and other forms of digital technology have created new forms of social relationships and widened access to information, they have also raised concerns. This course explores issues such as surveillance, addiction and bullying as well as the potential of digital technologies (e.g. smart cities, Big Data, and the internet of things). The course engages students' own experience of digital technology. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW104H1 - Creating Community: Art, Identity and Belonging

NEW104H1 - Creating Community: Art, Identity and Belonging
Hours: 12L/24S

How is art implicated in the process of community building? How does art foster a sense of community identity and belonging? This course explores how communities, in Toronto and beyond, engage a variety of art forms including graffiti, spoken-word, hip-hop, digital art, traditional dance and music to connect people and express community identity. Students will have the opportunity to visit community arts projects. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NEW105H1 - Current Issues Without Borders I

NEW105H1 - Current Issues Without Borders I
Hours: 12L/24S

This interdisciplinary course addresses a current issue that exemplifies the themes of "Learning Without Borders" in New One. It investigates how this issue is implicated in connecting us with others around the globe; it engages different kinds of knowledge and community perspectives; and integrates students' own experience as related to the issue. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW106H1 - Science, Health and Social Justice

NEW106H1 - Science, Health and Social Justice
Hours: 12L/24S

How can scientific knowledge and research be mobilized to impact individual and global health? How is health impacted by social, racial and economic inequalities? This course explores scientific research and practice with special attention to the translation of scientific knowledge in the public sphere, and its ability to inform policies, practices and laws. Students have the opportunity to meet with clinician-scientists, policy-makers, and other professionals connected to the health care system. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW111H1 - Food, Ethics and Sustainability

NEW111H1 - Food, Ethics and Sustainability
Hours: 12L/24S

How do we produce and ensure access to nutritious and environmentally sustainable food for all? This course explores what is involved in achieving ethical food production and food security, examining topics such as: the paradox of food waste amidst scarcity, the relationship between food production and climate change, community-led alternatives to dominant food systems, and the role of biotechnology. Research projects allow students to focus on an issue of particular interest. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW112H1 - Language Freedom and Power

NEW112H1 - Language Freedom and Power
Hours: 12L/24S

How do we imagine a balance between the need for communication, freedom of expression, and protection for marginalized groups? This course considers how language shapes and is shaped by the relations of power not only in such sites as colonies, nations and institutions, but also in popular culture and how we communicate online. It explores the key role of language in activism and youth cultures and allows students to focus on an issue of particular interest. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW113H1 - Unpacking Digital Technology

NEW113H1 - Unpacking Digital Technology
Hours: 12L/24S

What are the social and material implications of the digital technologies we use every day - for the present and for the future? This course explores how digital technologies have been remaking the world and affecting our lives by tracing their historical development, their social effects, and the impact of their physical presence. It also peers into scenarios of the future in this digital world. Students engage in research on a topic of their own interest. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW114H1 - Art for Social Change

NEW114H1 - Art for Social Change
Hours: 12L/24S

How does art contribute to social change? Artistic productions can draw attention to social problems, mobilize support for and symbolize social movements, and inspire new visions for imagined futures. This course will explore case studies of the role of various art forms in relation to past and current social change initiatives. Students will have the opportunity to engage in research on an art project of their choice. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NEW115H1 - Current Issues Without Borders II

NEW115H1 - Current Issues Without Borders II
Hours: 12L/24S

Explores the social and ethical implications of a current issue exemplifying the themes of "Learning Without Borders." Also considers examples of policy and community organizing responses. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW116H1 - Science and Global Threats

NEW116H1 - Science and Global Threats
Hours: 12L/24S

What is the role of science in addressing current global threats? What are the possibilities and the limitations of scientific research and knowledge in tackling complex problems such as climate change, pandemics and pollution? In this course, students explore these questions by examining case studies, meeting with specialists in various scientific fields, and engaging in research on a topic of their own choice. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health Courses

BPM100H1 - The Art & Science of Human Flourishing

BPM100H1 - The Art & Science of Human Flourishing
Hours: 12L/12P

A multi-cultural survey of recipes for a life of “flourishing,” through satisfaction, well-being, resilience, and accomplishment, as well as critical scholarship on concepts and practices of human flourishing. Students explore perspectives from the sciences and the humanities about what it means to flourish across diverse cultures and contexts, each week covering a specific theme and set of practices that expand self-awareness, enhance social connectivity, and facilitate purpose and passion.

Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

BPM214H1 - Socially Engaged Buddhism

BPM214H1 - Socially Engaged Buddhism
Previous Course Number: NEW214H1
Hours: 24L

Explores how Socially Engaged Buddhism has developed in response to global conversations on systemic oppression, climate justice, equity, decolonization, and trauma. We examine the roots of Engaged Buddhism in countries such as Vietnam, China & Taiwan, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and India, and its transformation into a global movement. Themes include Buddhist environmental activism, and Buddhist protest movements, along with research on the application of Buddhist teachings in healthcare, education, business, and the criminal justice system.

Exclusion: NEW214H1, NEW214Y1
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

BPM232H1 - Buddhism and Psychology

BPM232H1 - Buddhism and Psychology
Previous Course Number: NEW232H1, NEW232Y1
Hours: 36L

An overview of the encounter between Buddhism and psychology over the last century, with cross-disciplinary study of topics such as self, embodiment, impermanence, suffering, liberation, and insight. We explore how (and why) scientists, psychologists, and Buddhist reformers have reinterpreted Buddhism as “science” and how Buddhist contemplative practices such as mindfulness or compassion training have been transformed and promoted by modern psychology.

Exclusion: NEW232H1, NEW232Y1
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

JNR301H1 - The History of Buddhist Meditation

JNR301H1 - The History of Buddhist Meditation
Hours: 36L

This course will survey historical, cultural, and textual contexts for Buddhist meditative and contemplative practices and techniques.

Prerequisite: RLG206H1/ NEW232Y1/ BPM232H1
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

BPM330H1 - Mindfulness-Informed Interventions for Mental Health

BPM330H1 - Mindfulness-Informed Interventions for Mental Health
Previous Course Number: NEW330H1
Hours: 36L

An exploration of how mindfulness-based approaches are being used in biomedical mental health interventions. We study mindfulness from historical, societal, structural, cultural, professional, and personal perspectives, with an emphasis on its Buddhist foundations and on concepts of the embodied mind. We look at how recent socio-political phenomena are inspiring diverse applications and adaptations of mindfulness-based interventions.

Prerequisite: Completion of 9.0 credits
Exclusion: NEW330H1
Recommended Preparation: BPM232H1/ NEW232H1/ NEW232Y1
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

BPM332H1 - Buddhism and Psychotherapy

BPM332H1 - Buddhism and Psychotherapy
Previous Course Number: NEW332H1
Hours: 36L

A multi-cultural and interdisciplinary study of therapeutically-oriented practices and theories of the mind. Areas considered include positive psychology, psychoanalysis, cognitive-behavioural therapy, mindfulness meditation, and Jungian psychology, with comparison to various Buddhist teachings and practices.

Exclusion: NEW332H1
Recommended Preparation: BPM232H1/ NEW232Y1
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

BPM333H1 - Buddhism and Cognitive Science

BPM333H1 - Buddhism and Cognitive Science
Previous Course Number: NEW333H1
Hours: 36L

An interdisciplinary exploration of how cognitive science may connect with Buddhist terms, concepts, and practices, studying topics such as wisdom, mindfulness, meditation, insight, self-control, flow, or mystical experience.

Exclusion: NEW333H1
Recommended Preparation: BPM232H1/ NEW232Y1/ RLG206H1
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

BPM334H1 - Science of Wisdom: Buddhist and Western Traditions

BPM334H1 - Science of Wisdom: Buddhist and Western Traditions
Previous Course Number: NEW334H1
Hours: 36L

Provides a conceptual and contemplative interdisciplinary exploration of “wisdom traditions.” Buddhist approaches to self-actualization and wisdom will be compared to traditions from Mesopotamia, classical Greece, Christianity, the Renaissance, etc. Coursework includes guided experiential exercises for various traditions.

Exclusion: NEW334H1
Recommended Preparation: BPM232H1/ NEW232Y1
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

BPM335H1 - Meditation and the Body

BPM335H1 - Meditation and the Body
Previous Course Number: NEW335H1
Hours: 36L

An overview of scientific research on the psychological and neurophysiological effects of meditation. We explore the effects of different meditation styles on brain structure, brain activity, neurochemistry and other biological processes. Effects of meditation on mental health, pain, social behavior, aging, memory, and cardiovascular function are also a major focus. The use of meditation in the treatment and prevention of illness is critically reviewed.

Prerequisite: Completion of 9.0 credits
Exclusion: NEW335H1
Recommended Preparation: BPM232H1/ NEW232Y1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BPM336H1 - Special Topics in Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health

BPM336H1 - Special Topics in Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health
Previous Course Number: NEW336H1
Hours: 36L

Topics vary from year to year depending on the instructor.

Recommended Preparation: BPM232H1/ NEW232Y1
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

BPM337H1 - Special Topics in Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health

BPM337H1 - Special Topics in Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health
Previous Course Number: NEW337H1
Hours: 36L

Topics vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: 0.5 credits from the Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health Core Course Group.
Recommended Preparation: BPM232H1/ NEW232Y1

BPM338H1 - Exploring Mindful Awareness

BPM338H1 - Exploring Mindful Awareness
Previous Course Number: NEW338H1
Hours: 36L

An overview of mindfulness as a systematic investigation of subjective experience, with a survey of classic descriptions and contemporary scientific literature. Students will explore meditative practices in class and maintain a meditation practice outside class.

Prerequisite: BPM232H1/ NEW232Y1/ BPM332H1/ BPM333H1/ BPM334H1/ BPM335H1/ BPM339H1
Exclusion: NEW338H1, NEW432H1 (Advanced Special Topics in Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health: Cultivating Consciousness), offered in Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Summer 2015, and Winter 2016
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

BPM339H1 - Mind, Consciousness and the Self

BPM339H1 - Mind, Consciousness and the Self
Previous Course Number: NEW339H1
Hours: 36L

An interdisciplinary study of theories of mind, consciousness, and the self, placing Buddhist traditions in dialogue with scientific theories of the mind in psychology.

Exclusion: NEW339H1
Recommended Preparation: BPM232H1/ NEW232Y1
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

BPM381H1 - Buddhist Perspectives on Current Social Issues

BPM381H1 - Buddhist Perspectives on Current Social Issues
Hours: 36L

Explores teachings and principles in Buddhist canonical sources and considers their application to a wide range of social, political, and environmental crises we are facing today, including climate justice, systemic racism, burnout and mental health. We explore how Buddhist teachings are applied and adapted across different sectors of society including healthcare, education and business.

Exclusion: NEW214Y1/ NEW336H1 (Special Topics in Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health: Buddhist Perspectives on Current Social Issues), offered in Winter 2020 or Winter 2021/ BPM336H1 (Special Topics in Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health: Buddhist Perspectives on Current Social Issues), offered in Winter 2022
Recommended Preparation: BPM214H1/ BPM232H1/ NEW214H1/ NEW232H1/ NEW232Y1
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

BPM432H1 - Advanced Research in Meditation, Psychology and Neuroscience

BPM432H1 - Advanced Research in Meditation, Psychology and Neuroscience
Previous Course Number: NEW432H1
Hours: 36L

This seminar-based course prepares students for advanced research on meditation by exposing them to diverse theories, tools and techniques used in the field. Students will learn about the scientific method and develop critical thinking skills; critique scientific research articles on meditation; practice communication skills; and propose their own original study on meditation.

Recommended Preparation: BPM232H1/ NEW232Y1/ RLG206H1
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

BPM433H1 - Advanced Exploration of Buddhist Psychology and Practice

BPM433H1 - Advanced Exploration of Buddhist Psychology and Practice
Previous Course Number: NEW433H1
Hours: 36S

An in-depth, interdisciplinary exploration of how Buddhist teachings are set in conversation with contemporary scientific research on topics such as suffering, wellbeing, and compassion, through a mixture of lecture, textual analysis, discussion, and hands-on experiential practice.

Recommended Preparation: BPM232H1/ NEW232Y1/ RLG206H1
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

BPM438H1 - Mindfulness Meditation: Science and Research

BPM438H1 - Mindfulness Meditation: Science and Research
Previous Course Number: NEW438H1
Hours: 36S

An exponential increase of scientific research on aspects of Buddhist theories of mind and mindfulness meditation has contributed to the growing popularity of mindfulness across the sectors of healthcare, education and business. Examines the theoretical and empirical basis of mindfulness-based interventions and applications in healthcare settings and beyond. Critically addresses the roots of mindfulness, current models and adaptations, relevant applications, interventions and outcomes. Quantitative and qualitative research methodology will be reviewed, and conceptual, methodological, statistical, and interpretive limitations of the scientific literature will be discussed. The course aims to build scientific literacy skills through the assessment, critique, and discussion of peer reviewed journal articles.

Prerequisite: A statistics course (e.g. PSY201H1, SOC202H1, STA220H1)
Exclusion: NEW438H1
Recommended Preparation: BPM232H1/ NEW232Y1/ NEW232H1/ NEW331H1/ BPM333H1
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

BPM498H1 - Advanced Topics in Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health

BPM498H1 - Advanced Topics in Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health
Hours: 24S

An upper-level seminar. Topics vary from year to year, depending on the instructor.

Prerequisite: BPM232H1, at least 1.0 credit from the BPMH Core Group at the 300+ level. Students who do not meet the prerequisites are encouraged to contact the Program Office.

BPM499H1 - Advanced Topics in Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health

BPM499H1 - Advanced Topics in Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health
Hours: 24S

A joint graduate/undergraduate upper-level seminar. Topics vary from year to year, depending on the instructor. Consult the Program Office for course enrolment procedures.

Prerequisite: BPM232H1, at least 1.0 credit from the BPMH Core Group at the 300+ level. Students who do not meet the prerequisites are encouraged to contact the Program Office.

Critical Studies in Equity and Solidarity Courses

CSE240H1 - Introduction to Critical Equity and Solidarity Studies

CSE240H1 - Introduction to Critical Equity and Solidarity Studies
Previous Course Number: NEW240H1, NEW240Y1
Hours: 24L/12T

An interdisciplinary intersectional interrogation and examination of systemic inequity, structural oppression and social justice in local and global contexts. Provides a foundation for studies in critical equity and solidarity through a concentrated focus on theory and practice as it relates to major concepts, historical perspectives, key debates, lived experience and radical grassroots community resistance to inequity and oppression. Introduces critical equity as a theoretical framework through which to approach social relations of race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality and disability and as a site for thinking through formations of solidarity and transformative social change. The concept of self-defense articulated historically by the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense among others is a key component.

Exclusion: NEW240H1, NEW240Y1
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CSE241Y1 - Introduction to Critical Disability Studies

CSE241Y1 - Introduction to Critical Disability Studies
Previous Course Number: NEW241Y1
Hours: 48L/24T

Draws on an intersectional history and politics of normativity and bodily difference to understand disability as a diverse and materially salient social category that can be used as a lens to better understand systems and experiences of colonization, race, class, gender, age, etc. Explores scenes of disability or 'crip' solidarity, resistance and cultural production, disability D/deaf and mad arts, coalitional movements for disability justice, collective approaches to access and other non-normative ways of knowing and being.

Exclusion: NEW241Y1
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1), Society and its Institutions (3)

CSE270H1 - Community Dis/Engagement and Solidarity

CSE270H1 - Community Dis/Engagement and Solidarity
Previous Course Number: NEW270H1
Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to issues and questions arising from the field of 'community engagement'. Explores the meaning, practices and implications of/for 'community' and 'community (dis)engagement' from multiple perspectives (e.g. the State and its agencies, institutional power, colonial discourse, communities of embodied difference, etc.) Takes a multi-media and arts-based approach to examining self-care from an anti-colonial perspective of central importance in the practice and pedagogy of critical equity and solidarity in the collective struggle for freedom and transformation.

Exclusion: NEW270H1
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CSE339H1 - Special Topics in Equity and Solidarity Studies

CSE339H1 - Special Topics in Equity and Solidarity Studies
Hours: 24L

An upper-level course. Topics of study vary from year to year, depending on the instructor.

Prerequisite: CSE240H1/ NEW240H1/ NEW240Y1

CSE340H1 - Abolition in the Global Context: Theorizing Uprisings and Youth Activism against Policing and Prisons

CSE340H1 - Abolition in the Global Context: Theorizing Uprisings and Youth Activism against Policing and Prisons
Previous Course Number: NEW340H1
Hours: 24L

Considers the question: what does abolition mean in a global context? An analysis of how nation-states use prisons, (im)migrant detention centers, black sites, detention camps, military prisons, border checkpoints, refugee camps, walls, and concentration camps, to surveil, contain, and lock up disposable populations, and/or to suppress those that resist state violence. Explores these carceral spaces through a historical and political economic investigation of the processes that have produced these sites. Draws on anti-carceral perspectives on abolition and reform to examine uprisings and political activism, particularly youth activism, against prisons, policing, and forms of militarized, capitalist violence transnationally.

Prerequisite: CSE240H1/ NEW240H1/ NEW240Y1
Exclusion: NEW340H1 (Special Topics in Equity Studies: Youth, Activism and Social Change), offered in Fall 2017, Fall 2018, Fall 2019 and Fall 2020
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CSE341H1 - Theorizing Settler Colonialism, Capitalism and Race

CSE341H1 - Theorizing Settler Colonialism, Capitalism and Race
Previous Course Number: NEW341H1
Hours: 24S

Provides students with a theoretical background for understanding settler colonialism, capitalist social relations and difference (including race, class, gender, disability and sexuality) and solidarity. Provides an analysis of state violence and the formation of hegemonic power relations. Introduces students to the method of thinking dialectically to examine the social world as a set of relations between multiple phenomena occurring at the same time. Articulates an emancipatory politics of knowledge production and strategies of building solidarities to enable the imagination of a different future.

Prerequisite: CSE240H1/ NEW240Y1
Exclusion: NEW341H1
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CSE342H1 - Theory and Praxis in Food Security

CSE342H1 - Theory and Praxis in Food Security
Previous Course Number: NEW342H1
Hours: 24S

Explores the concept of food security in the context of equity issues related to global food systems. Students participate in food-related field work activities outside of regular classroom time.

Prerequisite: CSE240H1/ NEW240Y1
Exclusion: NEW342H1
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CSE344Y1 - Body Matters: Oppression, Solidarity and Justice

CSE344Y1 - Body Matters: Oppression, Solidarity and Justice
Previous Course Number: NEW344Y1
Hours: 48L

Through lectures, small-group discussions and experiential activities, explores how intersecting cultural stories impact our bodies and how stories inscribed upon us shape and constrain our relations, perceptions, experiences and vulnerabilities as embodied subjects. Draws on work in cultural studies, critical race and decolonial theory, gender studies, queer, trans and disability theory and fat studies to ask: Whose bodies matter? How do bodies come to matter? And, how are we - as embodied beings - engaged in acts of rewriting, resisting and otherwise transforming the body means and what it can do?

Prerequisite: CSE240H1/ NEW240Y1/ CSE241Y1
Exclusion: NEW344Y1, NEW344H1, CSE344H1
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1), Society and its Institutions (3)

CSE344H1 - Body Matters: Oppression, Solidarity and Justice

CSE344H1 - Body Matters: Oppression, Solidarity and Justice
Previous Course Number: NEW344H1
Hours: 24L

Through lectures, small-group discussions and experiential activities, explores how intersecting cultural stories impact our bodies and how stories inscribed upon us shape and constrain our relations, perceptions, experiences and vulnerabilities as embodied subjects. Draws on work in cultural studies, critical race and decolonial theory, gender studies, queer, trans and disability theory and fat studies to ask: Whose bodies matter? How do bodies come to matter? And, how are we - as embodied beings - engaged in acts of rewriting, resisting and otherwise transforming the body means and what it can do?

Prerequisite: CSE240H1/ NEW240Y1/ CSE241Y1
Exclusion: NEW344H1, NEW344Y1, CSE344Y1
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

CSE345H1 - Equity and Activism in Education

CSE345H1 - Equity and Activism in Education
Previous Course Number: NEW345H1
Hours: 24L

Examines contemporary issues in education and schooling from a social justice and equity perspective. Engages with a variety of theoretical frameworks including anti-homophobia education, critical pedagogy, critical race theory, decolonizing knowledges, and intersectionality. Includes an overview of educational activist projects.

Prerequisite: CSE240H1/ NEW240Y1
Exclusion: NEW345H1
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CSE346H1 - Community Organizing and Global Solidarity

CSE346H1 - Community Organizing and Global Solidarity
Previous Course Number: NEW346H1
Hours: 24L

Considers, from an interdisciplinary perspective, the evolution of community organizations and non-profits in the context of neoliberalism, settler colonialism, and imperialism. Examines the inter-woven relations of political economy, local community development, marginalized communities in Canada, and emergent forms of global/local solidarity.

Prerequisite: CSE240H1/ NEW240Y1
Exclusion: NEW346H1
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CSE347H1 - Critical Race and Anti-Racism Studies

CSE347H1 - Critical Race and Anti-Racism Studies
Previous Course Number: NEW347H1
Hours: 36L

Considers what it means to pursue integrative anti-racism in organizational/institutional settings such as the workplace, justice system, media and education through a study of theories on race and philosophical tenets of anti-racism. Examines the concept of race as a pedagogical discourse and social-political practice across local, national and global contexts.

Prerequisite: CSE240H1/ NEW240Y1
Exclusion: NEW347H1
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CSE348H1 - Special Topics in Equity Studies

CSE348H1 - Special Topics in Equity Studies
Previous Course Number: NEW348H1
Hours: 24L

An upper level course. Topics of study vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: CSE240H1/ NEW240Y1
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CSE349H1 - Disability Arts and Culture

CSE349H1 - Disability Arts and Culture
Previous Course Number: NEW349H1
Hours: 24S

Explores the work of disabled, mad, sick and/or Deaf artists and considers how disability disrupts - or 'crips' - artistic spaces and cultural movements. Engages with contemporary debates emanating from within these spaces and movements to reveal disability as a dynamic range of bodily practices, aesthetics and relations.

Prerequisite: CSE240H1/ NEW240Y1
Exclusion: NEW349H1
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CSE439H1 - Advanced Topics in Equity and Solidarity Studies

CSE439H1 - Advanced Topics in Equity and Solidarity Studies
Hours: 24S

An upper-level seminar course. Topics of study vary from year to year, depending on the instructor.

Prerequisite: CSE240H1/ NEW240H1/ NEW240Y1 and a 300+ level 0.5 credit from Critical Studies in Equity and Solidarity Core Group
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CSE440Y1 - Advanced Special Topics in Equity Studies

CSE440Y1 - Advanced Special Topics in Equity Studies
Previous Course Number: NEW440Y1
Hours: 72L

An advanced level seminar course. Topics of study vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: CSE240H1/ NEW240Y1 and an additional 0.5 credit at the 300+ level from the Critical Studies in Equity and Solidarity Core Group
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3), Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

CSE441H1 - Advanced Topics in Equity Studies

CSE441H1 - Advanced Topics in Equity Studies
Previous Course Number: NEW441H1
Hours: 24S

An advanced level seminar course. Topics vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: CSE240H1/ NEW240Y1

CSE442H1 - Food Systems and the Politics of Resistance

CSE442H1 - Food Systems and the Politics of Resistance
Previous Course Number: NEW442H1
Hours: 36L

Examines the food we eat in the local and global context of food systems, food sovereignty and food movements. Explores the possibilities for food as a catalyst for learning, resistance and social change. Enrolment is by application. Application forms are available on the CSES webpage prior to the start of course enrolment, and are accepted up to the end of the enrolment period, space permitting.

Note: This is a joint graduate/undergraduate course.

Prerequisite: 14.0 credits, CSE240H1/ NEW240Y1, CSE342H1, an additional 0.5 credit at the 300+ level from the Critical Studies in Equity and Solidarity Studies Core Group, a GPA of at least 3.5 in CSE courses
Exclusion: NEW442H1
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CSE443H1 - Advanced Special Topics in Equity Studies

CSE443H1 - Advanced Special Topics in Equity Studies
Previous Course Number: NEW443H1
Hours: 36S

An advanced level seminar course. Topics of study vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: CSE240H1/ NEW240Y1 and an additional 0.5 Critical Studies in Equity and Solidarity Core Group 300+ level course.
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CSE444H1 - Anti-Colonization and the Politics of Violence

CSE444H1 - Anti-Colonization and the Politics of Violence
Previous Course Number: NEW444H1
Hours: 36S

This advanced seminar interrogates how the theorizations, embodied lived experiences and lived resistance to structural violence can create social, epistemological, ontological and political decolonizing/anti-colonial transformation. The work of Frantz Fanon, John Akomfrah, The Black Panther Party for Self-Defense, Elaine Brown and Assata Shakur amongst others are utilized to search for alternative and oppositional ways to rethink and re-respond to violence. The seminar pursues a nuanced understanding of violence as it relates to de/anticolonization as a lived praxis of resistance and as a practice of self-defense that is grounded in the assertion that there can be no decolonization without anticolonization.

Prerequisite: CSE240H1/ NEW240Y1 and an additional 0.5 credit at the 300+ level from the Critical Studies in Equity and Solidarity Core Group.
Exclusion: NEW444H1
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CSE445H1 - Rethinking Palestine: Colonialism, Revolution and Transnational Solidarity

CSE445H1 - Rethinking Palestine: Colonialism, Revolution and Transnational Solidarity
Hours: 24S

Aims at decolonizing the study of Palestine by providing an overview of Palestine’s modern history that is grounded in critical perspectives that challenge dominant scholarly paradigms about Palestine. Provides specific theoretical approaches in the study of Palestinian history, culture and politics through such concepts as settler colonialism, occupation, revolution, nationalism, indigeneity, racial capitalism, imperialism, sovereignty, collective memory, resistance, liberation and transnational solidarity. Engages with memoirs, oral histories, archival documents, films, poetry, music and literature to understand the historical, political-economic and juridical foundations that have produced a century of oppression, violence, resistance and solidarity within, across and beyond Palestine.

Prerequisite: CSE240H1/ NEW240H1/ NEW240Y1, CSE341H1/ NEW341H1
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CSE446H1 - Community Development and Social Change

CSE446H1 - Community Development and Social Change
Previous Course Number: NEW446H1
Hours: 36L

Explores the significance of community development as a social change strategy, through a critical social analysis of local and global case studies and policies.

Prerequisite: 14.0 credits, CSE240H1/ NEW240Y1, CSE346H1, and an additional 0.5 credit at the 300+ level from the Critical Studies in Equity and Solidarity Studies Core Group.
Exclusion: NEW446H1
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CSE447H1 - Race, Ethnicity and Educational Praxis

CSE447H1 - Race, Ethnicity and Educational Praxis
Previous Course Number: NEW447H1
Hours: 36L

An application of critical race, ethnicity and social difference discourse to educational praxis. Examines the articulation of theoretical perspectives to explain particular incidents in society, and to understand forms of institutional racism and emerging minority responses. Explores the implications for pedagogical practices in education.

Prerequisite: CSE240H1/ NEW240Y1, CSE347H1 and one additional 0.5 credit at the 300+ level in CSE courses; permission of Program Director
Exclusion: NEW447H1
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CSE448H1 - Disability and the Child

CSE448H1 - Disability and the Child
Previous Course Number: NEW448H1
Hours: 24S

Examines a range of historical and present-day meanings associated with the figure of the disabled child. Draws on work emanating from a variety of disciplines, including history, psychology, neuroscience, visual arts, film and literature, and engaging with critical theories of race, class, gender, sexuality and disability, to discuss ideas and issues relevant to the construction of 21st century disabled childhoods. Counters the near monolithic story of disability as threat to the presumed goodness of normative childhood by asking: what alternate depictions and narratives of disabled childhood exist and what can they teach us?

Prerequisite: CSE240H1/ NEW240Y1/ CSE241Y1 and an additional 0.5 Critical Studies in Equity and Solidarity Core Group 300+ level course
Exclusion: NEW448H1
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CSE449H1 - Contemporary Theories in Critical Disability Studies

CSE449H1 - Contemporary Theories in Critical Disability Studies
Previous Course Number: NEW449H1
Hours: 24S

Explores competing conceptions, definitions and practices of disability through a range of critical disability theories, including crip-of-colour critique, decolonial theories of disability studies and black feminist disability frameworks. Enacts disability studies as a justice-oriented methodology or practice that has value for understanding and responding to colonial systems of race, class, gender and disability. Interrogates the shape and limits of disability and disability studies to ask the provocative question: what can disability studies do?

Prerequisite: CSE240H1/ NEW240Y1 and 0.5 credit from CSE241Y1/ CSE344Y1/ CSE349H1/ CSE448H1
Exclusion: NEW449H1
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

JNS450H1 - Sexuality & Disability

JNS450H1 - Sexuality & Disability
Hours: 24S

An interdisciplinary and intersectional approach to the study of disability and sexuality. Students will engage with historical, mainstream and critical discourses and explore complex issues and representations pertaining to disability, sexuality, sexual practices and desire. Draws from a range of writings and cultural texts in queer, crip and sexuality studies.

Prerequisite: 1.0 SDS credit/ NEW240Y1/ NEW240H1/ CSE240H1/ NEW241Y1/ CSE241Y1
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CSE469Y1 - Decolonizing Research Methodologies for New Researchers

CSE469Y1 - Decolonizing Research Methodologies for New Researchers
Previous Course Number: NEW469Y1
Hours: 48S

A feminist/anti-racist/anti-colonial/anti-imperialist exploration of research methods. Examines the work of researchers and scholar-activists who seek to humanize research with communities detrimentally impacted by colonial, imperialist, heteropatriarchal research agendas and processes. Supports students' independent research projects through guidance from the course instructor. Prepares students for graduate studies or research-oriented careers. Enrolment is by application. Application forms are available on the CSES webpage prior to the start of the enrolment period and are accepted up to the end of the enrolment period, space permitting. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: CSE240H1/ NEW240Y1 and 1.0 credit from Critical Studies in Equity and Solidarity Core Group 300+ level courses
Exclusion: NEW469Y1
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1), Society and its Institutions (3)

CSE499H1 - Advanced Topics in Critical Studies in Equity and Solidarity

CSE499H1 - Advanced Topics in Critical Studies in Equity and Solidarity
Hours: 24S

A joint graduate/undergraduate upper-level seminar. Topics vary from year to year, depending on the instructor. Consult the Program Office for course enrolment procedures.

Prerequisite: CSE240H1, at least 1.0 credit from the CSES Core Group at the 300+ level. Students who do not meet the prerequisites are encouraged to contact the Program Office.

Community Engaged Learning (CEL) Courses

NEW495Y1 - Community Engaged Learning: Critical and Creative Perspectives on the Non-Profit Sector

NEW495Y1 - Community Engaged Learning: Critical and Creative Perspectives on the Non-Profit Sector
Hours: 96P/24S

A placement-based course in which students develop knowledge, practice and professional skills appropriate to the social purpose sector while working to support programming for community partners. The accompanying seminar considers critical social justice issues and creative models of community-engagement practice from grassroots, community and non-profit organizations and other perspectives that support students’ experiential, participatory and reflective learning. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Enrolment is by application. Detailed application instructions are available on the CEL website.

There are 3 enrolment application options:

  1. Apply to an in-person placement (positions posted on the CEL website)
  2. Apply to a virtual placement
  3. Apply to the course without a placement

Placement positions will be posted on the CEL website by June 1. The application period is June 1 - July 15. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis, and match meetings will be held between June 1 - August 31.

Prerequisite: Completion of 9.0 credits
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW496H1 - Community Engaged Learning: Critical and Creative Perspectives on the Non-Profit Sector

NEW496H1 - Community Engaged Learning: Critical and Creative Perspectives on the Non-Profit Sector
Hours: 48P/12S

A placement-based course in which students develop knowledge, practice and professional skills appropriate to the social purpose sector while working to support programming for community partners. The accompanying seminar considers critical social justice issues and creative models of community-engagement practice from grassroots, community and non-profit organizations and other perspectives that support students’ experiential, participatory and reflective learning. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Enrolment is by application. Detailed application instructions are available on the CEL website.

There are 3 enrolment application options:

  1. Apply to an in-person placement (positions posted on the CEL website)
  2. Apply to a virtual placement
  3. Apply to the course without a placement

Placement positions will be posted on the CEL website by June 1. The application period is June 1 - July 15. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis, and match meetings will be held between June 1 - August 31.

Prerequisite: Completion of 9.0 credits
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW497Y1 - Critical and Creative Perspectives on Community Based Research (CBR): An Advanced Seminar

NEW497Y1 - Critical and Creative Perspectives on Community Based Research (CBR): An Advanced Seminar
Hours: 96P/24S

Explores how research is conducted and mobilized by marginalized communities as a form of resistance, knowledge production and social change. Examines the foundations of empirical research, the role of the university as a site of research activity and the ethics and methods of community-based research. Informed by examples of grassroots research projects from Black, Indigenous and racialized communities locally, nationally and globally. In this course, students engage in community-based and participatory action research projects with community partners. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Enrolment is by application. Detailed application instructions available on the CEL website.

There are 3 enrolment application options:

  1. Apply to an in-person placement (positions posted on the CEL website)
  2. Apply to a virtual placement
  3. Apply to the course without a placement

Placement positions will be posted on the CEL website by June 1. The application period is June 1 - July 15. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis, and match meetings will be held between June 1 - August 31.

Prerequisite: Completion of 9.0 credits
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW498H1 - Critical and Creative Perspectives on Community Based Research (CBR): An Advanced Seminar

NEW498H1 - Critical and Creative Perspectives on Community Based Research (CBR): An Advanced Seminar
Hours: 48P/12S

Explores how research is conducted and mobilized by marginalized communities as a form of resistance, knowledge production and social change. Examines the foundations of empirical research, the role of the university as a site of research activity and the ethics and methods of community-based research. Informed by examples of grassroots research projects from Black, Indigenous and racialized communities locally, nationally and globally. In this course, students engage in community-based and participatory action research projects with community partners. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Enrolment is by application. Detailed application instructions available on the CEL website.

There are 3 enrolment application options:

  1. Apply to an in-person placement (positions posted on the CEL website)
  2. Apply to a virtual placement
  3. Apply to the course without a placement

Placement positions will be posted on the CEL website by June 1. The application period is June 1 - July 15. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis, and match meetings will be held between June 1 - August 31.

Prerequisite: Completion of 9.0 credits
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Independent Studies Courses

NEW299Y1 - Research Opportunity Program

NEW299Y1 - Research Opportunity Program

Credit course for supervised participation in faculty research project. Details at https://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/academics/research-opportunities…. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

NEW390Y1 - New College Independent Studies

NEW390Y1 - New College Independent Studies

New College Independent Study courses are designed both to complement regular offerings in New College Programs and to provide an opportunity for New College students in any program to enrich their studies. The normal expectation of a project course is that the student, aided and advised by their supervisor, will read relevant literature, and plan, analyze and report on an original and independent investigation of an appropriate topic. Enrolment is by application. Written applications, which include an application form and detailed proposal, should be made through the Programs Office for approval by the Vice Principal of New College or a designate by April 15 for the Summer Session; by July 15 for the Fall Term; or by November 15 for the Winter Term. Should the deadline fall on a weekend, applications will be accepted until the following Monday. Students will be notified of the acceptance or rejection of an application. If the project requires ethics approval, please be advised that you should find and consult with a supervisor about meeting this requirement at least a semester in advance of these deadlines. For more information and application forms, please see the Independent Studies website: http://www.newcollege.utoronto.ca/new-college-academic-programs/independent-studies. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Completion of 9.0 credits

NEW391H1 - New College Independent Studies

NEW391H1 - New College Independent Studies

New College Independent Study courses are designed both to complement regular offerings in New College Programs and to provide an opportunity for New College students in any program to enrich their studies. The normal expectation of a project course is that the student, aided and advised by their supervisor, will read relevant literature, and plan, analyze and report on an original and independent investigation of an appropriate topic. Enrolment is by application. Written applications, which include an application form and detailed proposal, should be made through the Programs Office for approval by the Vice Principal of New College or a designate by April 15 for the Summer Session; by July 15 for the Fall Term; or by November 15 for the Winter Term. Should the deadline fall on a weekend, applications will be accepted until the following Monday. Students will be notified of the acceptance or rejection of an application. If the project requires ethics approval, please be advised that you should find and consult with a supervisor about meeting this requirement at least a semester in advance of these deadlines. For more information and application forms, please see the Independent Studies website: http://www.newcollege.utoronto.ca/new-college-academic-programs/independent-studies. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Completion of 9.0 credits

NEW490Y1 - New College Independent Studies

NEW490Y1 - New College Independent Studies

New College Independent Study courses are designed both to complement regular offerings in New College Programs and to provide an opportunity for New College students in any program to enrich their studies. The normal expectation of a project course is that the student, aided and advised by their supervisor, will read relevant literature, and plan, analyze and report on an original and independent investigation of an appropriate topic. Enrolment is by application. Written applications, which include an application form and detailed proposal, should be made through the Programs Office for approval by the Vice Principal of New College or a designate by April 15 for the Summer Session; by July 15 for the Fall Term; or by November 15 for the Winter Term. Should the deadline fall on a weekend, applications will be accepted until the following Monday. Students will be notified of the acceptance or rejection of an application. If the project requires ethics approval, please be advised that you should find and consult with a supervisor about meeting this requirement at least a semester in advance of these deadlines. For more information and application forms, please see the Independent Studies website: http://www.newcollege.utoronto.ca/new-college-academic-programs/independent-studies. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Completion of 14.0 credits

NEW491H1 - New College Independent Studies

NEW491H1 - New College Independent Studies

New College Independent Study courses are designed both to complement regular offerings in New College Programs and to provide an opportunity for New College students in any program to enrich their studies. The normal expectation of a project course is that the student, aided and advised by their supervisor, will read relevant literature, and plan, analyze and report on an original and independent investigation of an appropriate topic. Enrolment is by application. Written applications, which include an application form and detailed proposal, should be made through the Programs Office for approval by the Vice Principal of New College or a designate by April 15 for the Summer Session; by July 15 for the Fall Term; or by November 15 for the Winter Term. Should the deadline fall on a weekend, applications will be accepted until the following Monday. Students will be notified of the acceptance or rejection of an application. If the project requires ethics approval, please be advised that you should find and consult with a supervisor about meeting this requirement at least a semester in advance of these deadlines. For more information and application forms, please see the Independent Studies website: http://www.newcollege.utoronto.ca/new-college-academic-programs/independent-studies. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Completion of 14.0 credits

Interdisciplinary Courses

NEW271H1 - Interdisciplinary Special Topics

NEW271H1 - Interdisciplinary Special Topics
Hours: 24L

Topics vary from year to year depending on the instructor. Consult timetable for current offering information.

JQR360H1 - The Canadian Census: Populations, Migrations and Demographics

JQR360H1 - The Canadian Census: Populations, Migrations and Demographics
Hours: 24L/12T

Examines the Canadian population census through the experience of diasporic groups in Canada. Approaches the census as a statistical tool, an historical source and an ideological project of citizenship and nationalism. Uses census data to explore mathematical and statistical concepts and to integrate numerical ways of thinking with qualitative analysis. (Jointly sponsored by African Studies, Diaspora and Transnational Studies, Caribbean Studies, Critical Studies in Equity and Solidarity, and Latin American Studies).

Prerequisite: DTS200Y1/ HIS230H1/ HIS231H1/ LAS200H1/ LAS201H1/ CAR120Y1/ AFR150Y1/ CAR220H1/ CAR221H1/ NEW224Y1/ CAR225H1/ CAR226H1/ CSE240H1/ NEW240Y1
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW370Y1 - Interdisciplinary Special Topics

NEW370Y1 - Interdisciplinary Special Topics
Hours: 48L

Topics vary from year to year depending on the instructor.

NEW371H0 - International Field Course

NEW371H0 - International Field Course

Provides opportunities for students to engage in an international experiential learning program related to their academic areas of study. The course involves seminars, group exercises, site visits and a final project. Some sessions will be held in Toronto prior to and following the trip. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Foundational course from participating programs (Indigenous Studies; African Studies; Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health; Caribbean Studies; Equity Studies; Human Biology)

NEW372H1 - Interdisciplinary Special Topics

NEW372H1 - Interdisciplinary Special Topics
Hours: 24L

Topics vary from year to year depending on the instructor. Consult timetable for current offering information.

NEW398Y0 - Research Excursion

NEW398Y0 - Research Excursion

Credit course for supervised participation in faculty research project. Details at https://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/academics/research-opportunities…. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

NEW471H1 - Interdisciplinary Special Topics

NEW471H1 - Interdisciplinary Special Topics
Hours: 24S

Topics vary from year to year depending on the instructor.

Interdisciplinary Courses in Jungian Theory

NEW302Y1 - C.G. Jung: Stories, Patterns, Symbols

NEW302Y1 - C.G. Jung: Stories, Patterns, Symbols
Hours: 48L/24S

Impact of Jung's analytical psychology, critical methodology and interpretative practice on issues in religion, anthropology, art and literature, popular culture, gender studies and postmodernist critique. Theoretical studies include traditional Jungian and contemporary post-Jungian texts together with feminist and non-Jungian sources.

Prerequisite: 4.0 credits, at least 1.0 of which should be in the HUM/BR=1/2
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1), Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NEW303H1 - Hypotheses of the Unconscious

NEW303H1 - Hypotheses of the Unconscious
Hours: 12L/12S

Current discussions of the hypotheses, starting with Freud's and Jung's hypotheses, especially Jung's collective unconscious; critical examination through retrospective analysis of the evolution and development of the concept in works from philosophy, psychology, poetry, ethnology, science and popular culture that anticipated, influenced or were influenced by the work of Freud and Jung, post-Freudians and post-Jungians.

Prerequisite: 4.0 credits, at least 1.0 of which should be in the HUM/BR=1/2
Recommended Preparation: NEW302Y1
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NEW402Y1 - Advanced Special Topics in Jungian Theory

NEW402Y1 - Advanced Special Topics in Jungian Theory
Hours: 48S

Topics vary from year to year, depending on the interests of students and instructors.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

NEW403H1 - Advanced Special Topics in Jungian Theory

NEW403H1 - Advanced Special Topics in Jungian Theory
Hours: 24S

Topics vary from year to year depending on the interests of students and instructors.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

International Foundation Program Courses

UTP100H1 - Themes in World History

UTP100H1 - Themes in World History
Hours: 24L

Surveys the development of human societies from their origins to the present. Topics may include the environment, cultural development and interaction, the creation and nature of belief systems, political, economic and social structures, gender relations, and the relationship between global patterns and local development. Restricted to students enrolled in the UTPrep program.

Exclusion: IFP100H1/ IFP100Y1
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

IFP100Y1 - Themes in World History

IFP100Y1 - Themes in World History
Hours: 48L/36T

Surveys the development of human societies from their origins to the present using examples from across the world. Topics may include the environment, cultural development and interaction, the creation and nature of belief systems, political, economic and social structures, gender relations, and the relationship between global patterns and local developments. Enrolment is restricted to students registered in the International Foundation Program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3), Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

IFP100H1 - Themes in World History

IFP100H1 - Themes in World History
Hours: 24L

Surveys the development of human societies from their origins to the present. Topics may include the environment, cultural development and interaction, the creation and nature of belief systems, political, economic and social structures, gender relations, and the relationship between global patterns and local development. Restricted to students enrolled in the summer offering of the International Foundation Program (IFP). Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Exclusion: IFP100Y1/ UTP100H1
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

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