Trinity College


Faculty List

Professors
C. Brittain, PhD (Dean of Divinity and Margaret E. Fleck Chair in Anglican Studies)
M. Moran, LL.B, LL.M, SJD (Provost and Vice-Chancellor)
M. Ratcliffe, BSc, PhD (Dean of Arts and Vice-Provost)

Assistant Professors
J. Duncan, MA, PhD (Director, Ethics, Society, & Law Program)
C. Ewing, PhD
C. Ewing, PhD
J. Fitzgibbon, PhD (Associate Director, Trinity One Program & Acting Director, International Relations Program)
M.J. Kessler, PhD (Director, Trinity One Program)
T. Sayle, PhD (Director, International Relations Program)
N. Spiegelaar, PhD (Associate Director Sustainability Initiative)

Adjunct Professor
J. Leitch, LL.M, PhD (Associate Director, Ethics, Society & Law)

Visiting Professors and Special Lecturers
D. Livermore, PhD (Pearson Sabia Distinguished Visitor)
R. McCarney, LL.B, DLS (International Relations Program, James Coutts Distinguished Visitor) 

Introduction

Trinity College offers Trinity One, a set of first-year courses, an independent studies program, and three inter-disciplinary programs: Ethics, Society, and Law; Immunology; International Relations. The Major Program in Ethics, Society, and Law assembles courses offered by a variety of Departments and Colleges, including History, Philosophy, Political Science, Religion, Sociology, Woodsworth College and Trinity College. The Specialist and Major Programs in Immunology are assembled from offerings by the Departments of Biochemistry, Immunology, Molecular Genetics. The International Relations Program encompasses courses offered by the Departments of History, Political Science, Economics and Trinity College.

The Margaret MacMillan Trinity One Program

Trinity One provides first-year students with the opportunity to explore together significant issues and ideas pertaining to the conduct of human life and world affairs. Trinity One has six streams, each linked to a prominent aspect of the College’s intellectual identity: Policy, Philosophy, & Economics; Ethics, Society, & Law; International Relations; Medicine & Global Health; Biomedical Health; and Environment & Sustainability. Each stream includes two seminar courses limited to 25 students. These courses foster small-group discussion and emphasize the development of critical-thinking, oral-presentation, writing and research skills. Co-curricular events enable students in the streams of Trinity One to hear guest speakers and to engage in informal conversation with one another and with their professors. Please see the Trinity One webpages.

Ethics, Society, and Law

The Ethics, Society and Law program allows undergraduates to explore some of the most crucial questions facing contemporary society, and to do so by means of an explicitly interdisciplinary approach. The humanities, social sciences and natural sciences all provide useful lenses for study and distinctive skill sets. Students are required to cover core areas in each of the streams; they additionally select their own areas of focus from optional courses in fields like philosophy, religion, anthropology, women and gender studies, economics, geography, political science, sociology and criminology. Engaging across disciplines, E, S and L majors acquire a strong critical preparation for well-informed, effective analysis and action, which will serve them professionally, locally and as members of the global community. Please see the ES&L webpages.

International Relations

The study of international relations dates back to antiquity and remains one of the most vital disciplines in the academic community. Its purpose is to explore the enduring questions of the origins of war and the maintenance of peace, prosperity, sustainability and well-being, the nature and exercise of power within the international system, and the changing character of the participants and process and outcomes in international decision-making.

Drawing on the strengths of faculty members in History, Political Science, Economics and related disciplines, the International Relations program offers a structured and interdisciplinary education. The program provides students with knowledge of the historical and contemporary dimensions of the international system while introducing them to the methodologies employed in historical, political, economic and social scientific analysis.
  
The International Relations Specialist and Major are limited enrolment programs. For more information, please consult the International Relations Program webpages.

Immunology Studies

For more information, please see the entry under Immunology or the Immunology departmental website.

Independent Studies

The Trinity College Independent Studies Program is open to students of all colleges. Only full-time students are eligible to apply. The program allows you to undertake extensive research into a topic that interests you, and is an especially suitable way of doing interdisciplinary work on subjects that are not directly part of the present university curriculum. Enrolment is open until the end of the first week of the semester in which the course will begin.

Participation in the program is restricted to students who have completed at least 10.0 credits and have maintained a CGPA of at least 3.50. Students applying to the Trinity Program must already have the agreement of a full-time faculty member of the University to act as supervisor for either a half course or a full year Independent Study course. The maximum number of independent studies half courses for which a student may receive credit is one, and the maximum number of independent studies full course equivalents for which a student may receive credit is two, typically one credit in third year and one credit in fourth year. Permission to undertake Trinity independent studies projects for the equivalent of two full courses will normally be granted only to students with a cumulative GPA of at least 3.70. Your proposal must be approved by your supervisor and accepted by the director of the program.

Course numbers are as follows: Students enrolling for the first time register for one or more of TRN300H1, TRN301Y1, TRN302Y1 (third year), or for one or more of TRN400H1, TRN404Y1, TRN405Y1 (fourth year), as appropriate. Those enrolling for a second time register in one of TRN400H1, TRN404Y1, and TRN405Y1, as appropriate. Enrolment in third year TRN independent studies courses is not a prerequisite for fourth year TRN independent studies courses but students who initially enrol in fourth year TRN independent studies courses may not subsequently enrol in third year TRN independent studies courses.

Students are enrolled in TRN independent studies courses by the Dean of Arts’ office at Trinity College. Students should complete the enrolment approval process in enough time to be enrolled no later than the end of the first week of classes in the relevant term.

Please note that a TRN independent studies course is not a "directed reading" course. The expectation is that students should do original research and provide a report of this research as part of their evaluation.

Students are required to identify a second reader for their final reports, in addition to their direct supervisor, whose evaluation of the paper will form part of their final grade for the course. The second reader should also be a faculty member.

Students are required to file a graded progress report with the director of the program no later than two weeks before the last date for dropping the course without academic penalty. All work including final reports must be submitted on or before the last day of classes. The supervisor and second reader will then grade the report and copies of the final essay or report, one graded by the supervisor and one independently graded by the second reader must be emailed to the Director within one week of the last day of classes.

For more information, please see the Independent Studies webpage or consult the director.

Trinity College Programs

Ethics, Society, and Law Major (Arts Program) - ASMAJ1618

The Ethics, Society and Law program allows undergraduates to explore some of the most crucial questions facing contemporary society, and to do so by means of an explicitly interdisciplinary approach. The humanities, social sciences and natural sciences all provide useful lenses for study and distinctive skill sets. Students are required to cover core areas in each of the streams; they additionally select their own areas of focus from optional courses in fields like philosophy, religion, anthropology, women and gender studies, economics, geography, political science, sociology and criminology. Engaging across disciplines, E, S and L majors acquire a strong critical preparation for well-informed, effective analysis and action, which will serve them professionally, locally and as a members of the global community. Please see the ES&L webpages: http://www.trinity.utoronto.ca/current/programs-courses/esl/esl.html

Enrolment Requirements:

This is a limited enrolment program. Students must have completed 4.0 credits and meet the requirements listed below to enrol.

Variable Minimum Grade Average
A minimum grade average in required courses is needed for entry, and this minimum changes each year depending on available spaces and the number of applicants. The following courses must be completed:

For students who have completed 4.0 to 8.5 credits:

• 3.0 credits from BR=2 and/or BR=3 and/or TRN170Y1

To ensure that students admitted to the program will be successful, applicants with a grade average lower than 77% will not be considered for admission. Please note that obtaining this minimum grade average does not guarantee admission to the program.

For students who have completed 9.0 credits:

• A minimum grade average of 77% in 3.0 credits that count toward the program, including 1.0 credit from: ETH201H1, ETH210H1, ETH220H1, ETH230H1, PHL265H1, PHL271H1, PHL275H1, and POL200Y1.

To ensure that students admitted to the program will be successful, applicants with a grade average lower than 77% will not be considered for admission. Please note that obtaining this minimum grade average does not guarantee admission to the program.


Completion Requirements:

(7.0 credits)

1. First year: While no specific courses are required in first year, course selection should take into account the program’s admission requirements above, as well as the prerequisites for 200+ level courses students plan to take to complete the program.

2. Second year: PHL271H1, TRN203H1, and TRN204H1 are required courses that students are recommended to take in second year (their first year of registration in the program).

3. Third year: TRN303H1, TRN312H1

4. Fourth year: TRN412H1.

5. 1.0 credit from ETH201H1, ETH210H1, ETH220H1, ETH230H1, ETH350H1, ETH401H1, PHL265H1, PHL275H1, POL200Y1, to be taken in any year of registration in the program.

6. 3.0 credits from Groups A-D, including at least a 0.5 credit from each of Groups A-C and at least 1.5 credits at the 300+ level. Courses taken in fulfillment of requirement 5 above may not be counted toward the Group courses here.

Group A (Ethics)
ETH201H1, ETH210H1, ETH220H1, ETH230H1, ETH350H1, ETH401H1, PHL273H1, PHL275H1, PHL281H1, PHL295H1, PHL337H1, PHL341H1, PHL373H1, PHL375H1, PHL378H1, PHL380H1, PHL381H1, PHL382H1, PHL383H1, PHL384H1, PHL394H1, PHL407H1, RLG339H1

Group B (Society)
AFR351Y1, AFR352H1, AFR453Y1, ANT204H1, CAR225H1, CAR226H1, CAR324H1, CSC300H1, CSE340H1, CSE341H1, ECO313H1, ECO332H1, ECO336H1, ENV221H1, ENV222H1, ENV347H1, GGR416H1, HIS332H1, HPS324H1, INS261H1, INS353H1, INS354H1, INS360Y1, INS407H1, JGE331H1, JPI201H1, LAS200H1, LAS201H1, LAS320H1, LAS350H1, LAS370H1, PHL265H1, PHL365H1, POL200Y1, POL214Y1/​​ POL214H1, POL320H1, POL321H1, POL412H1, POL432H1; PSY311H1, PSY321H1, SOC208H1, SOC212H1, SOC220H1, SOC265H1, SOC313H1, SOC330H1, SOC360H1, SOC367H1, CRI205H1, CRI210H1, CRI300H1, CRI335H1, CRI340H1, CRI380H1, CRI425H1, WGS373H1

Group C (Law)
CLA336H1, CRI225H1, CRI364H1, CRI365H1, CRI422H1, ECO320H1, ENV422H1, MST361H1, NMC385H1, NMC484H1, PHL370H1, PHL416H1, POL337H1, POL340H1, POL341H1, TRN304H1/​​ TRN304Y1, TRN305Y1/​​ TRN305H1, TRN425Y1, WGS365H1

Group D (Further Courses)
AFR351Y1, INS201Y1, INS205H1, RLG309H1, TRN200Y1, TRN320H1, TRN321H1, TRN406H1/​​ TRN407Y1, and with permission of the director: TRN300H1, TRN301Y1, TRN302Y1, TRN400H1, TRN404Y1, TRN405Y1, TRN377Y1, TRN477H1, 1.0 credit from TRN160Y1, TRN161Y1, TRN171Y1, TRN172Y1.

N.B. (1) The above CRI courses are available only to students enrolled in the double major program Ethics, Society, and Law/Criminology. (2) Access to courses in the Ethics, Society, and Law program is not guaranteed; students must check prerequisites.

Note: Effective Fall 2021, courses associated with St. Michael's College's Mediaeval Studies program will have the new "MST" designator.

International Relations Specialist (Arts Program) - ASSPE1469

The study of international relations dates back to antiquity and remains one of the most vital disciplines in the academic community. Its purpose is to explore the enduring questions of the origins of war and the maintenance of peace, the nature and exercise of power within an international system, and the changing character of the participants in international decision-making.

Drawing on the strengths of faculty members in History, Economics, and Political Science, the International Relations Specialist Program offers a structured and interdisciplinary education. The program provides students with knowledge of the historical and contemporary dimensions of the international system while introducing them to the methodologies employed in historical, political and economic analysis.

Enrolment Requirements:

This is a limited enrolment program. Students must have completed 4.0 credits and meet the requirements listed below to enrol.

Variable Minimum Grade Average
A minimum grade average in required courses is needed for entry, and this minimum changes each year depending on available spaces and the number of applicants. The following courses must be completed:

• ( ECO101H1 and ECO102H1) with a minimum grade of 63% in each, or ECO105Y1 with a minimum grade of 80%
• 2.0 credits from GGR112H1, HIS102Y1, HIS103Y1, MUN101H1, MUN102H1, MUN105Y1, POL101H1, POL106H1, POL107H1, POL109H1, TRN150Y1, TRN151Y1, TRN152Y1, TRN160Y1, TRN162Y1, VIC181H1, VIC183H1, VIC184H1, VIC185H1, with a minimum grade of 70% in each course.

To ensure that students admitted to the program will be successful, applicants with a final grade lower than the minimum grades stated above will not be considered for admission. Please note that obtaining these minimum final grades does not guarantee admission to the program; admission will be based on the average of the required courses.

Note:
Completing ECO105Y1 limits future enrolment options in ECO courses. First-year MAT courses are a prerequisite for many optional ECO courses in the IR Program Requirements listed below. Students are strongly advised to enrol in MAT133Y1/​ ( MAT135H1 and MAT136H1)/ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1 if they wish to pursue ECO electives.

Completion Requirements:

(13.0 credits)

Consult the Office of the International Relations Program, room 310N, Munk School of Global Affairs, 416-946-8950.

Year 1 (3.0 credits):

  1. ECO101H1 and ECO102H1, OR ECO105Y1
  2. 2.0 credits from GGR112H1, HIS102Y1, HIS103Y1, MUN101H1, MUN102H1, MUN105Y1, POL101H1, POL106H1, POL107H1, POL109H1, TRN150Y1, TRN151Y1, TRN152Y1, TRN160Y1, TRN162Y1, VIC181H1, VIC183H1, VIC184H1, VIC185H1

Year 2 (2.5 credits):

  1. ECO231H1 and ECO232H1, OR ECO200Y1/​​ ECO202Y1/​​ ECO206Y1/​​ ECO208Y1. Students should note that completing ( ECO231H1 and ECO232H1) limits future enrolment options in ECO courses.
  2. POL208H1
  3. TRN250Y1

Year 3 (4.0 credits):

  1. TRN350H1
  2. 1.0 credit from: ECO320H1/​​ ECO341H1/​​ ECO342H1/​​ ECO362H1/​​ ECO364H1/​​ ECO365H1/​​ ECO368H1
  3. 1.0 credit from: AFR353H1/​ CAS310H1/​ CAS320H1/​ EAS324H1/​ EAS345Y1/​ EAS357H1/​ EAS372H1/​ EAS373H1/​ EAS375H1/​ HIS311Y1/​​ HIS312H1/​ HIS315H1/​ HIS316H1/​ HIS317H1/​ HIS319H1/​ HIS324H1/​ HIS325H1/​ HIS328H1/​​ HIS330H1/​ HIS334H1/​​ HIS338H1/​ HIS339H1/​​ HIS340H1/​ HIS341Y1/​ HIS342H1/​​ HIS343H1/​​ HIS344H1/​​ HIS347H1/​​ HIS349H1/​ HIS351H1/​ HIS353Y1/​ HIS355H1/​ HIS356H1/​ HIS359H1/​​ HIS361H1/​​ HIS364H1/​​ HIS370H1/​ HIS371H1/​ HIS376H1/​ HIS377H1/​ HIS378H1/​​ HIS379H1/​​ HIS382H1/​ HIS384H1/​ HIS385H1/​ HIS386H1/​​ HIS388H1/​ HIS397H1/​ JHA384H1/​ JHA394H1/​ NMC355H1/​ NMC372H1/​ NMC373H1/​ RLG309H1 or with permission of the Director: HIS304H1/​ HIS326H1/​ HIS348H1/​ HIS372H1/​ HIS389H1/​ HIS389Y1
  4. 1.0 credit from: AFR353H1/​​ AFR354H1/​ AFR359H1/​ CAS310H1/​ CAS320H1/​ ECO324H1/​​ ECO341H1/​​ ECO342H1/​ ECO362H1/​​ ECO364H1/​​ ECO365H1/​​ ECO368H1/​​ GGR314H1/​​ GGR320H1/​ GGR326H1/​ GGR329H1/​ GGR338H1/​ GGR341H1/​​ GGR342H1/​ GGR343H1 GGR344H1/​ JPA331H1/​ JPA376Y0/​​ NMC378H1/​​ POL301H1/​ POL302H1​/ POL305H1/​ POL307H1/​ POL309H1/​ POL312H1/​ POL313H1/​ POL324H1/​ POL325H1/​ POL326H1/​ POL327H1/​ POL328H1/​ POL329H1/​​ POL340H1/​ POL341H1/​ POL347H1/​ POL351H1/​ POL358H1/​ POL359H1/​ POL360H1/​ POL361H1/​​ POL362H1/​ POL377H1/​ POL378H1/​​ POL380H1/​ POL384H1/​ POL386H1/​ WGS340H1 or with permission of the Director: TRN307H1/​ TRN308H1/​ TRN377Y1

  5. 0.5 credit from:
    any of the above from Year 3 Req. 2-4 not previously counted or with permission of the Director: ECO351H1/​​ TRN307H1/​​ TRN308H1/​​ TRN377Y1

Note: Those students choosing to add a Focus should be guided in their selection by the courses listed in their Focus group.

Year 4 (3.5 credits)

  1. 1.0 credit from: ( TRN409H1, TRN410H1)/ TRN411Y1/​ TRN419Y1/​ TRN421Y1
  2. 2.5 additional credits from:
    AFR455H1/​ ECO403H1/​​ ECO419H1/​​ ECO429H1/​​ ECO430Y1/​​ ECO431H1/​​ ECO459H1/​​ ECO465H1/​ GGR418H1/​​ GGR419H1/​​ GGR430H1/​ GLA2050H1/ HIS401H1/​​ HIS405Y1/​ HIS411H1/​​ HIS415Y1/​​ HIS416H1/​​ HIS417H1/​​ HIS439H1/​ HIS445H1/​​ HIS451H1/​​ HIS457H1/​​ HIS465H1/​​ HIS470H1/​​ HIS479H1/​ HIS483H1/​​ HIS487H1/​​ HIS492H1/​​ HIS493H1/​ HIS494H1/​​ HIS498H1/​​ POL410H1/​​ POL412H1/​ POL413H1/​​ POL417H1/​​ POL418H1/​ POL435H1/​​ POL441H1/​​ POL442H1/​​ POL445H1/​​ POL456H1/​ POL457Y1/​​ POL458H1/​ POL459Y1/​​ POL466H1/​​ POL467H1/​​ POL469H1/​​ POL472H1/​ POL477H1/​​ POL486H1/​​ POL487H1/​ TRN409H1/​ TRN410H1/​​ VIC476H1

Notes:

  • Those students choosing to add a Focus should be guided in their selection by the courses listed in their Focus group.
  • Effective Fall 2021, courses associated with New College's African Studies program will have the new "AFR" designator.

Focus in Canadian Foreign & Security Relations (Specialist) - ASFOC1469B

Enrolment Requirements:

Enrolment in the International Relations Specialist is required for entry into this Focus.

Enrolment in this Focus is recommended after second year to guide choice of courses in the higher years. Please note normal course prerequisites will apply to all courses in the Focus.

Completion Requirements:

(2.5 credits)

  1. HIS311Y1
  2. 1.5 credits chosen from the following list:
    HIS312H1, POL312Y1, HIS402H1, HIS405Y1, HIS429H1, HIS430H1, POL467H1, TRN409H1 (Canadian Defense Policy since the end of the Cold War), TRN409H1 (Nuclear Weapons and International Politics), TRN410H1, TRN419Y1, VIC476H1

Notes:

  • Focus courses meet the basic IRP inclusion standard of substantially and directly addressing relations between and among countries at the state or society level.
  • Students can request substitutions from the IRP Director
  • Not all courses may be available at all times without scheduling conflicts.

Focus in International Economy (Specialist) - ASFOC1469C

Enrolment Requirements:

Enrolment in the International Relations Specialist is required for entry into this Focus.

Enrolment in this Focus is recommended after second year to guide choice of courses in the higher years. Please note normal course prerequisites will apply to all courses in the Focus.

Completion Requirements:

(2.5 credits)

  1. ECO341H1
  2. ECO342H1
  3. 1.5 credits chosen from the following list:
    ECO362H1, ECO364H1, ECO365H1, ECO368H1, GGR326H1, POL361H1, POL362H1, GGR344H1/​ POL372H1, ECO403H1, ECO419H1, ECO459H1, ECO465H1, GGR418H1, GGR430H1, HIS417H1, POL411H1, POL435H1, POL477H1

Notes:

  • Focus courses meet the basic IRP inclusion standard of substantially and directly addressing relations between and among countries at the state or society level.
  • Students can request substitutions from the IRP Director
  • Not all courses may be available at all times without scheduling conflicts.

Focus in International Law & Human Rights (Specialist) - ASFOC1469E

Enrolment Requirements:

Enrolment in the International Relations Specialist is required for entry into this Focus.

Enrolment in this Focus is recommended after second year to guide choice of courses in the higher years. Please note normal course prerequisites will apply to all courses in the Focus.

Completion Requirements:

(2.5 credits)

  1. POL340Y1
  2. 1.5 credits chosen from the following list:
    ECO320H1, HIS338H1, HIS361H1, HIS397H1, POL324H1, GGR419H1, HIS411H1, HIS465Y1, HIS470H1, HIS487H1, HIS493H1, POL412H1, POL456Y1, POL457Y1, POL469H1, TRN421Y1

Notes:

  • Focus courses meet the basic IRP inclusion standard of substantially and directly addressing relations between and among countries at the state or society level.
  • Students can request substitutions from the IRP Director
  • Not all courses may be available at all times without scheduling conflicts.

Focus in Transnational Exchanges (Specialist) - ASFOC1469G

Enrolment Requirements:

Enrolment in the International Relations Specialist is required for entry into this Focus.

Enrolment in this Focus is recommended after second year to guide choice of courses in the higher years. Please note normal course prerequisites will apply to all courses in the Focus.

Completion Requirements:

2.5 credits from the following list:
ECO365H1, ECO368H1, HIS324H1, HIS341Y1, HIS359H1, HIS415Y1, HIS439H1, HIS494H1, JHA394H1, GGR324H1/​ POL371H1, GGR344H1/​ POL372H1, POL409H1, POL456Y1, POL445H1, POL472H1, TRN409H1 (Nuclear Weapons and International Politics), TRN410H1

Notes:

  • Focus courses meet the basic IRP inclusion standard of substantially and directly addressing relations between and among countries at the state or society level.
  • Students can request substitutions from the IRP Director
  • Not all courses may be available at all times without scheduling conflicts.

International Relations Major (Arts Program) - ASMAJ1469

The study of international relations dates back to antiquity and remains one of the most vital disciplines in the academic community. Its purpose is to explore the enduring questions of the origins of war and the maintenance of peace, the nature and exercise of power within an international system, and the changing character of the participants in international decision-making.

Drawing on the strengths of faculty members in History, Economics, and Political Science, the International Relations Specialist Program offers a structured and interdisciplinary education. The program provides students with knowledge of the historical and contemporary dimensions of the international system while introducing them to the methodologies employed in historical, political and economic analysis.

Enrolment Requirements:

This is a limited enrolment program. Students must have completed 4.0 credits and meet the requirements listed below to enrol.

Variable Minimum Grade Average
A minimum grade average in required courses is needed for entry, and this minimum changes each year depending on available spaces and the number of applicants. The following courses must be completed:

• ( ECO101H1 and ECO102H1) with a minimum grade of 63% in each, or ECO105Y1 with a minimum grade of 80%
• 1.0 credit from GGR112H1, HIS102Y1, HIS103Y1, MUN101H1, MUN102H1, MUN105Y1, POL101H1, POL106H1, POL107H1, POL109H1, TRN150Y1, TRN151Y1, TRN152Y1, TRN160Y1, TRN162Y1, VIC181H1, VIC183H1, VIC184H1, VIC185H1, with a minimum grade of 70% in each course.

To ensure that students admitted to the program will be successful, applicants with a final grade lower than the minimum grades stated above will not be considered for admission. Please note that obtaining these minimum final grades does not guarantee admission to the program; admission will be based on the average of the required courses.

Note:
Completing ECO105Y1 limits future enrolment options in ECO courses. First-year MAT courses are a prerequisite for many optional ECO courses in the IR Program Requirements listed below. Students are strongly advised to enrol in MAT133Y1/​ ( MAT135H1 and MAT136H1)/ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1 if they wish to pursue ECO electives.

Completion Requirements:

(7.5 credits)

Year 1 (2.0 credits):

  1. ECO101H1 and ECO102H1, OR ECO105Y1
  2. 1.0 credit from GGR112H1, HIS102Y1, HIS103Y1, MUN101H1, MUN102H1, MUN105Y1, POL101H1, POL106H1, POL107H1, POL109H1, TRN150Y1, TRN151Y1, TRN152Y1, TRN160Y1, TRN162Y1, VIC181H1, VIC183H1, VIC184H1, VIC185H1

Year 2 (2.5 credits):

  1. ECO231H1 and ECO232H1, OR​ ECO200Y1/​​ ECO202Y1/​​ ECO206Y1/​​ ECO208Y1. Students should note that completing ( ECO231H1 and ECO232H1) limits future enrolment options in ECO courses.
  2. POL208H1
  3. TRN250Y1

Year 3 (2.5 credits):

  1. TRN350H1
  2. 1.0 credit from: AFR353H1/​ CAS310H1/​ CAS320H1/​ EAS324H1/​ EAS345Y1/​ EAS357H1/​ EAS372H1/​ EAS373H1/​ EAS375H1/​ HIS311Y1/​ ​ HIS312H1/​ HIS315H1/​ HIS316H1/​ HIS317H1/​ HIS319H1/​ HIS324H1/​ HIS325H1/​ HIS328H1/​​ HIS330H1/​ HIS334H1/​​ HIS338H1/​ HIS339H1/​​ HIS340H1/​ HIS341Y1/​ HIS342H1/​​ HIS343H1/​​ HIS344H1/​​ HIS347H1/​​ HIS349H1/​ HIS351H1/​ HIS353Y1/​ HIS355H1/​ HIS356H1/​ HIS359H1/​​ HIS361H1/​​ HIS364H1/​​ HIS370H1/​ HIS371H1/​ HIS376H1/​ HIS377H1/​ HIS378H1/​​ HIS379H1/​​ HIS382H1/​ HIS384H1/​ HIS385H1/​ HIS386H1/​​ HIS388H1/​ HIS397H1/​ JHA384H1/​ JHA394H1/​ NMC355H1/​ NMC372H1/​ NMC373H1/​ RLG309H1 or with permission of the Director: HIS304H1/​ HIS326H1/​ HIS348H1/​ HIS372H1/​ HIS389H1/​ HIS389Y1

  3. 1.0 credit from: AFR353H1/​​ AFR354H1/​ AFR359H1/​ CAS310H1/​ CAS320H1/​ ECO324H1/​​ ECO341H1/​​ ECO342H1/​ ECO362H1/​​ ECO364H1/​​ ECO365H1/​​ ECO368H1/​​ GGR314H1/​​ GGR320H1/​ GGR326H1/​ GGR329H1/​ GGR338H1/​​ GGR341H1/​ GGR342H1/​ GGR343H1/​ GGR344H1/​ JPA331H1/​ JPA376Y0/​​ NMC378H1/​​ POL301H1/​ POL302H1​/ POL305H1/​ POL307H1/​ POL309H1/​ POL312H1/​ POL313H1/​ POL324H1/​ POL325H1/​ POL326H1/​ POL327H1/​ POL328H1/​ POL329H1/​​ POL340H1/​ POL341H1/​ POL347H1/​ POL351H1/​ POL358H1/​ POL359H1/​ POL360H1/​ POL361H1/​​ POL362H1/​ POL377H1/​​ POL378H1/​ POL380H1/​ POL384H1/​ POL386H1/​ WGS340H1 or with permission of the Director: TRN307H1/​ TRN308H1/​ TRN377Y1

Year 4 (0.5 credit)

TRN409H1/​ TRN410H1

Notes:

  • Those students choosing to add a Focus should be guided in their selection of courses at the third and fourth year level by the courses listed in the specific Focus group they choose.
  • Effective Fall 2021, courses associated with New College's African Studies program will have the new "AFR" designator.

Focus in Canadian Foreign & Security Relations (Major) - ASFOC1469A

Enrolment Requirements:

Enrolment in the International Relations Major is required for entry into the Focus.

Enrolment in this Focus is recommended after second year to guide choice of courses in the higher years. Please note normal course prerequisites will apply to all courses in the Focus.

Completion Requirements:

Note: this Focus requires completion of a 0.5 credit or more in addition to the 7.5 credits required for the International Relations Major.

(2.5 credits)

  1. HIS311Y1
  2. 1.5 credits chosen from the following list:
    HIS312H1, POL312Y1, HIS402H1, HIS405Y1, HIS429H1, HIS430H1, POL467H1, TRN409H1 (Canadian Defense Policy since the end of the Cold War), TRN409H1 (Nuclear Weapons and International Politics), TRN410H1, TRN419Y1, VIC476H1

Notes:

  • Focus courses meet the basic IRP inclusion standard of substantially and directly addressing relations between and among countries at the state or society level.
  • Students can request substitutions from the IRP Director
  • Not all courses may be available at all times without scheduling conflicts.

Focus in International Economy (Major) - ASFOC1469H

Enrolment Requirements:

Enrolment in the International Relations Major is required for entry into this Focus.

Enrolment in this Focus is recommended after second year to guide choice of courses in the higher years. Please note normal course prerequisites will apply to all courses in the Focus.

Completion Requirements:

(2.5 credits)

  1. ECO341H1
  2. ECO342H1
  3. 1.5 credits chosen from the following list:
    ECO362H1, ECO364H1, ECO365H1, ECO368H1, GGR326H1, POL361H1, POL362H1, GGR344H1/​ POL372H1, ECO403H1, ECO419H1, ECO459H1, ECO465H1, GGR418H1, GGR430H1, HIS417H1, POL411H1, POL435H1, POL477H1

Notes:

  • Focus courses meet the basic IRP inclusion standard of substantially and directly addressing relations between and among countries at the state or society level.
  • Students can request substitutions from the IRP Director
  • Not all courses may be available at all times without scheduling conflicts.

Focus in International Law & Human Rights (Major) - ASFOC1469D

Enrolment Requirements:

Enrolment in the International Relations Major is required for entry into the Focus.

Enrolment in this Focus is recommended after second year to guide choice of courses in the higher years. Please note normal course prerequisites will apply to all courses in the Focus.

Completion Requirements:

Note: this Focus requires completion of a 0.5 credit or more in addition to the 7.5 credits required for the International Relations Major.

(2.5 credits)

  1. POL340Y1
  2. 1.5 FCE chosen from the following list:
    ECO320H1, HIS338H1, HIS361H1, HIS397H1, POL324H1, GGR419H1, HIS411H1, HIS465Y1, HIS470H1, HIS487H1, HIS493H1, POL412H1, POL456Y1, POL457Y1, POL469H1, TRN421Y1

Notes:

  • Focus courses meet the basic IRP inclusion standard of substantially and directly addressing relations between and among countries at the state or society level.
  • Students can request substitutions from the IRP Director
  • Not all courses may be available at all times without scheduling conflicts.

Focus in Transnational Exchanges (Major) - ASFOC1469F

Enrolment Requirements:

Enrolment in the International Relations Major is required for entry into the Focus.

Enrolment in this Focus is recommended after second year to guide choice of courses in the higher years. Please note normal course prerequisites will apply to all courses in the Focus.

Completion Requirements:

Note: depending on course selection, this Focus may require the completion of extra 0.5 credits in addition to the 7.5 credits required for the International Relations Major.

2.5 credits from the following list:
ECO365H1, ECO368H1, HIS324H1, HIS341Y1, HIS359H1, HIS415Y1, HIS439H1, HIS494H1, JHA394H1, GGR324H1/​ POL371H1, GGR344H1/​ POL372H1, POL409H1, POL456Y1, POL445H1, POL472H1, TRN409H1 (Nuclear Weapons and International Politics), TRN410H1

Notes:

  • Focus courses meet the basic IRP inclusion standard of substantially and directly addressing relations between and among countries at the state or society level.
  • Students can request substitutions from the IRP Director
  • Not all courses may be available at all times without scheduling conflicts.

Certificate in International Affairs (UofT Global Scholar) - ASCER1469

Enrolment Requirements:

This is an open enrolment Certificate. A student who has completed 4.0 credits may enrol in the Certificate.

Completion Requirements:

(Total: 2.5 credits)

  1. 1.0 credit from EAS100Y1, EAS110Y1, EAS120Y1, EST100H1, EST101H1, FIN100H1, FIN110H1, FSL100H1, FSL102H1, FSL121Y1, GER100Y1, GRK101H1, GRK102H1, HUN100Y1, INS210Y1, INS215Y1, INS220Y1, INS230H1, ITA100Y1, LAT101H1, LAT102H1, MGR100H1, NEW280Y1/​ AFR280Y1, NML110Y1, NML155H1, NML156H1, NML260Y1, NML270Y1, PRT100Y1, PRT120Y1, RLG260H1, RLG261H1, RLG262H1, RLG263H1, RLG264H1, SLA100H1, SLA101H1, SLA105Y1, SLA106H1, SLA107Y1, SLA108Y1, SLA109Y1, SLA116H1, SPA100Y1, SWE100H1, SWE101H1. Other introductory language classes may be approved by the Director of the International Relations Program.

  2. 1.0 credit from TRN250Y1 or ( POL208H1 + one of POL201H1/​ POL205H1/​ POL211H1/​ POL218H1/​ POL219H1/​ POL220H1/​ POL223H1/​ POL224H1)

  3. 0.5 credit gained studying international affairs as part of an international experience.

    Students are encouraged to discuss possible options with the Director of the International Relations Program.

    Transfer credit equivalents of the following courses earned from participation in an international exchange or actual courses completed via the Summer Abroad program will qualify for this requirement:

    ECO324H1/​​ ECO341H1/​​ ECO342H1/​​ ECO362H1/​​ ECO364H1/​​ ECO365H1/​​ ECO368H1/​​ ECO401H1/​ ECO403H1/​ ECO409H1/​ ECO417H1/​ ECO419H1/​ ECO459H1/​ ECO465H1/​ GGR314H1/​​ GGR326H1/​​ GGR329H1/​ HIS324H1/​​ HIS338H1/​​ HIS341Y1/​​ HIS343H1/​​ HIS344H1/​​ HIS359H1/​​ HIS361H1/​​ HIS377H1/​​ HIS379H1/​​ HIS397H1/​​ HIS401H1/​ HIS402H1/​ HIS416H1/​ HIS419H1/​ HIS429H1/​ HIS439H1/​ HIS451H1/​ HIS457H1/​ HIS465Y1/​ HIS470H1/​ HIS473H1/​ HIS479H1/​ HIS492H1/​ HIS493H1/​ HIS494H1/​ HIS498H1/​ JHA384H1/​​ JPA376Y0/​​ NMC378H1/​​ POL324H1/​​ POL326Y1/​ POL329H1/​​ POL340Y1/​​ POL361H1/​​ POL362H1/​​ POL371H1/​​ POL372H1/​​ POL377H1/​ POL409H1/​ POL410H1/​ POL412H1/​ POL413H1/​ POL417Y1/​ POL435H1/​ POL441H1/​ POL442H1/​ POL445H1/​ POL456Y1/​ POL459Y1/​ POL466H1/​ POL467H1/​ POL468H1/​ POL469H1/​ POL472H1/​ POL477H1/​ POL481H1/​ POL486H1/​ POL486Y1/​ POL487H1/​ POL487Y1.

    A Global Classroom course, International Course Module, or Research Excursion Program dealing with some aspect of international affairs not captured in the above list may also fulfill the global experience requirement with approval of the Director of the International Relations Program.

Note: Effective Fall 2021, courses associated with New College's African Studies program will have the new "AFR" designator.


Regarding Trinity College Courses

  • Trinity College First-Year Foundations;
  • Trinity One;
  • Ethics, Society, and Law;
  • Independent Studies;
  • International Relations;
  • Other

First Year Foundations (FYF)

The FYF seminars are designed to provide the opportunity to work closely with an instructor in a class of no more than thirty students. These interactive seminars are intended to stimulate the students’ curiosity and provide an opportunity to get to know a member of the professorial staff in a seminar environment during the first year of study. 

Trinity One Courses

Students participating in other Foundational Year programs (e.g., Vic One, Munk One) are excluded from Trinity One.

Trinity College Courses

Trinity College First-Year Foundations

TRN191H1 - Disaster and Terrorism: Religion and Ethics at Ground Zero

TRN191H1 - Disaster and Terrorism: Religion and Ethics at Ground Zero
Hours: 24S

In response to contemporary terrorist attacks and natural disasters, many are led to cry, “The world will never be the same!” How should such statements be evaluated? What impact do they have on social and political life? This course explores religious and cultural responses to human tragedy and cultural shock. Discussion will attend to debates over the meaning of suffering, public reactions to terrorism, the traumas of natural disasters, and the role of media in covering such events. These themes are engaged from the perspectives of ethics, cultural theory, religious studies, and theology. The course focuses on popular responses to events that include: the Lisbon Earthquake of 1755, the First World War, the Holocaust, Hurricane Katrina, the Japanese experiences of Hiroshima and Fukushima, 9/11, and more recent examples of terrorism and disaster. Attention will be given to concerns such as the impact of trauma on social and political debate, the function of religious discourse in the face of tragedy, the nature of ideology, and the relationship between religion and violence. A thematic concern throughout the course will be the nature of ethical commitment in the midst of confusion and social disruption. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

TRN192H1 - Public Health in Canada: Health for the 21st Century

TRN192H1 - Public Health in Canada: Health for the 21st Century
Hours: 24L

This course deals with preventive care and population health. It will also move into new areas like healthcare and the environment (climate change) and the greening of healthcare. It will look at health as an extension of democracy – of how health extends individual rights beyond the political realm to the social realm, of how it can build social capital and knit populations together. It will look at areas inimical to health, ‘detriments to health’ and how economic inequality can lead to health inequality. Along with this it will look at ways of empowering the individual, the public as agent and a role of public engagement by major institutions. It will also push beyond the popular determinants of health to engage students in a paradigm on next steps, the future challenges in population health. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN193H1 - Canadian Health Policy: Past, Present and Future

TRN193H1 - Canadian Health Policy: Past, Present and Future
Hours: 24L

This is a health systems course. It deals with illness care, individual health, and health insurance. It will take a comparative and historical approach. We will look at the genesis of Canadian healthcare, our benefits and those other countries provide (e.g., pharmacare, dental care). We will look at indirect contributors like childcare and basic income. We will examine the public-private debate. We will also take some novel approaches. One is that the university has an expanded role in the 21st century, one that involves public outreach, a role that includes healthcare. Recent academic literature on healthcare notes that it is nation-building. We will look at why. We will examine some cutting-edge ideas, like integrated care, the learning health system, the concept of customer-owners. We will explore whether our healthcare system needs to be anchored by ‘institutions of excellence’ and identify these. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN194H1 - Literature and Wicked Problems

TRN194H1 - Literature and Wicked Problems
Hours: 24L

This course explores contemporary literature in relation to the interdisciplinary framework of “wicked problems.” Research emphasizes that complex, entrenched problems, like government relations with Indigenous peoples or human impacts on the climate, involve interconnected systems and require approaches that cross disciplines and types of knowledge. The course examines the role of literary works (mostly 21st-century fiction) in addressing these issues of pressing concern to students as global citizens. Critical thinking, scholarly reading and database research are foundational skills that this course strengthens in order to prepare students for their writing in disciplines across the university. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

TRN195H1 - The Literature of Heroes and Horrors

TRN195H1 - The Literature of Heroes and Horrors
Hours: 24L

This course explores contemporary literary works that redefine heroism in light of personal and cultural trauma. What does recent literature (mostly 21st-century fiction) show us about the nature of heroism in our time? To answer this question, the course examines theories of psychological trauma, studies in the field of positive psychology, and research on gothic and dystopian literature. Critical thinking, scholarly reading and database research are foundational skills that the course strengthens in order to prepare students for their writing in disciplines across the university. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

TRN196H1 - Joy and Resistance in Diverse Storytelling

TRN196H1 - Joy and Resistance in Diverse Storytelling
Hours: 24L

"Can we speak about joy for once?" In contemporary literature from Black, Indigenous and People of Colour (BIPOC) authors across Canada and Turtle Island, there is a resurgence in diasporic stories that capture the joy and resistance of carving space for community against the mechanisms of the state. This course explores how BIPOC literature has intersected with social problems and activist movements, creating spaces for readers to reflect on their own lived experiences. Students will expand their creative thinking, critical reading and scholarly writing skills through multi-modal assignments that offer connections to current issues and community knowledge. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

TRN197H1 - In the Shadow of the Vikings: Depictions of the Early Norse in Medieval, Modern, and Post-Modern Culture

TRN197H1 - In the Shadow of the Vikings: Depictions of the Early Norse in Medieval, Modern, and Post-Modern Culture
Hours: 24L

Although rarely attested during the historical era when they were active, since the early nineteenth century the word “Viking” has been popularly applied to describe groups of Scandinavian adventurers who marauded along the frontiers of Medieval Europe: in this respect, the image of “the Viking” may be regarded as much a modern, as it is a medieval, creation. The legacy of historical “Viking activities” was a factor in the development of modern nation states in Scandinavia and the Baltic region, and their contributions to the heritage of people residing in Britain, continental Europe, the Middle East, and even the Atlantic coast of Canada have been and continue to be cited to the present day. Aspects of culture attributed to “the Vikings”—their assumed independence, courage, resourcefulness, and tenacity in the face of adversity, as well as the occult characteristics of their cosmology—have, for better and worse, inspired modern artists, writers, composers, intellectuals, explorers and even political leaders, and persist in present day literature, art, music, sport and popular culture as well. Why and how do elements of historic Viking culture continue to evoke traditions and characteristics popularly attributed to “the Vikings”? What are some implications of “Viking-ness” for those people in the post-Viking Age past and/or present who we may regard—or may regard themselves—as the “cultural descendants” of the Vikings? In this seminar, participants will study selected cultural artifacts of the “post-Viking Age,” along with recent multidisciplinary research, to observe how various “post-Viking Age” cultures and subcultures have selectively appropriated elements of the “Viking” past. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

TRN198H1 - The Viking Phenomenon: Commerce, Conflict, and Communication along Europe’s Frontiers, 7th – 15th Century

TRN198H1 - The Viking Phenomenon: Commerce, Conflict, and Communication along Europe’s Frontiers, 7th – 15th Century
Hours: 24L

Perspectives on the impact that the Scandinavian raiders and traders popularly referred to as “Vikings” had on European and World history continue to develop as the work of historians, archaeologists, linguists, and scientists expands our understanding of the past. Recent research has revised the traditional view of the “Vikings” as primarily marauding warriors; in its place, a more complex and nuanced conception of the implications that “Viking activity” had on the social, economic, and political development of the peoples with whom they came in contact has emerged. This seminar will consider the relationship between the traditional conception of the “Viking warrior” and recent research that suggests the broader impact that the “Viking Phenomenon” had upon the economic revival and sociopolitical development of medieval Europe and its frontiers. In the course of the seminar, we will examine a selection of historical records and information concerning artifacts of the material culture of “The Viking Age” in order to better understand the activities of early medieval “Vikings,” not only as warriors, but also as agents of commerce, explorers, pioneers, and rulers. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

TRN199H1 - Classical Social and Political Thought from the 18th Century Enlightenment to the 20th Century

TRN199H1 - Classical Social and Political Thought from the 18th Century Enlightenment to the 20th Century
Hours: 24L

We begin with European social and political thought during the 18th century, including ideas of enlightenment and revolution. We move on to the 19th century to engage with the critical Marxist theorisation of the new “capitalist” social and political formation, and look at the reception of the Marxist view in the 20th century, all of which continues to affect the character of Western social and political thought. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities, Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

Trinity One

TRN125Y1 - Contemporary Issues in Health Science

TRN125Y1 - Contemporary Issues in Health Science
Hours: 48S

Can the immune system be strengthened? Are some diseases incurable? What is the best way to stop the spread of a virus? This course examines the scientific principles underlying contemporary issues in the science of human health with the goal of exposing students to the current state of biomedical research. We will develop three distinct types of understanding that are essential to literacy about the science of human health: the basic concepts in science; the nature of scientific research; and the rules that govern how scientists do their work. This course will explore topics such as stem cells, gene editing, regenerative medicine, vaccination, drug development, and personalized medicine. Restricted to first-year students admitted to the Trinity One Program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Corequisite: TRN225Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4), Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN135Y1 - Science and Social Choice

TRN135Y1 - Science and Social Choice
Hours: 48S

Many of the decisions we make as a society rely on advances in scientific knowledge. In this course, we will discuss a number of contemporary medical topics that involve complex scientific discoveries about health, the human body, disease, and infection. We will consider genes and study the medical implications of our growing understanding of the human genome. We will study a number of recent cases in order to explore how scientific findings influence decision-making in hospitals and the selection of social policies. We will also discuss the background forces that shape medical research and how this affects the kinds of health problems that are prioritized. The objective of this course is to develop a solid understanding of biological concepts related to human health and consider them in their wider social and ethical contexts. Restricted to first-year students admitted to the Trinity One Program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Corequisite: TRN136Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science, Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4), Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN136Y1 - Canadian Health Policy in the Global Context

TRN136Y1 - Canadian Health Policy in the Global Context
Hours: 48S

In this course we consider when our health policies support the highest standards of medical care, consistent with the latest discoveries in medical research. We examine the ways in which debates around ethics, effectiveness and efficiency shape global and national health policy. We begin by exploring the most important advancements in global health policy over the past two decades. We then assess Canada’s experience in providing health care, identifying lessons for national policy reform and for Canada’s role as a leader in global health research and policy. We explore a range of health challenges including universal health care, anti-microbial drug resistance, HIV AIDS, tuberculosis, reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health, cardiovascular care, oncology, environmental health, indigenous health, violence against women and mental health. Restricted to first-year students admitted to the Trinity One Program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Corequisite: TRN135Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science, Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2), Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN140Y1 - Ethics, Humans, and Nature

TRN140Y1 - Ethics, Humans, and Nature
Hours: 48S

This course introduces students to ethical issues arising from the way humans interact with nature. Students will study some theoretical approaches for evaluating how human society affects the planet, ecosystems, and the other animals. Theories will be drawn from philosophy, theology, and ecology, and will include Western and non-Western approaches to living in harmony with one’s environment. Key themes may include speciesism – the idea that human needs are the most important – as well as overpopulation, extinction, vegetarianism, and responsible resource management. The course will also look at how social policy shapes human choices and whether sustainability initiatives should be pursued through the public or private sector. The course will also discuss the spiritual connection between humans and the environment and how society can be organized to promote access to nature in urban communities. Restricted to first-year students admitted to the Trinity One Program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Corequisite: TRN141Y1
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2), Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN141Y1 - Environmental Science and Pathways to Sustainability

TRN141Y1 - Environmental Science and Pathways to Sustainability
Hours: 48S

This course introduces students to fundamental issues in environmental science with a multi-disciplinary focus on human impacts on physical and biological systems, and on identifying pathways to sustainability. Key themes will include energy and resources, climate change, land use, contaminants and protecting biodiversity in the context of the Anthropocene. The course challenges students to apply the scientific method to environmental monitoring, research and problem solving through project design, data collection and analysis. The course also emphases information literacy, skills to distinguish science from pseudo-science, and considerations around representation of environmental science in the media. Restricted to first-year students admitted to the Trinity One Program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Corequisite: TRN140Y1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4), The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

TRN150Y1 - National versus International

TRN150Y1 - National versus International
Hours: 48S

The international system today faces extraordinary challenges. Understanding these challenges requires understanding the past. This seminar course briefly reviews the origins and development of the international system from the 17th century through the age of empires and the great wars of the 20th century. It then concentrates on the clash of nationalism with internationalism in the world since 1945, looking at such issues as what drives nationalism and what alternatives there are to it. We will study ideas and ideologies as well as the institutions that make up the current geopolitical world. Restricted to first-year students admitted to the Trinity One Program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Corequisite: TRN151Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2), Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN151Y1 - Global Governance

TRN151Y1 - Global Governance
Hours: 48S

Terrorism, the proliferation of arms (including weapons of mass destruction), environmental degradation, globalization, technological change, and the rise of non-state actors all pose challenges to statecraft and the management of global order. This seminar course explores the changing dynamics of global politics and the responses to them by states (and others). Topics will include an examination of new forms of international collaboration that have developed in the wake of crises in the years following the Second World War. Restricted to first-year students admitted to the Trinity One Program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Corequisite: TRN150Y1/ TRN152Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2), Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN152Y1 - Justice & Global Conflict

TRN152Y1 - Justice & Global Conflict
Hours: 48S

Modern states face both new and familiar challenges to protecting national security. National insecurity threatens a country’s capacity to protect the well-being of its citizens while at the same time participating in international organizations and treaties. This course explores the origins and management of international conflict from the 17th to the 21st century, focusing on the precursors to war and the markers of peace. We will also consider the ways in which our current global world order promotes and preserves justice between and within nations. Students will consider different theoretical approaches to justice between nations, and apply them to recent security issues. By studying the history of conflict and the difference between justice and injustice students will gain a deeper understanding of how current geopolitical actors can structure and affect the prospects for security policy reform moving forward. Restricted to first-year students admitted to the Trinity One Program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Corequisite: TRN151Y1
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2), Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN160Y1 - Public Policy and the Public Good

TRN160Y1 - Public Policy and the Public Good
Hours: 48S

This course examines the sense of the public good that undergirds Canada's domestic and international obligations. We examine the notion of the “public” through investigating possible answers to a central political question: what is the purpose of government? Drawing on readings in philosophy and political theory, the course considers a variety of approaches to defining the nature of the public good and how policy makers should respond when competing goods (e.g., freedom and security) clash with each other. In addition, the course looks at the treaties and conventions that articulate the responsibilities of signatory nations regarding challenges such as climate change mitigation, refugee resettlement, and foreign aid. Students will learn how international agreements either compel or encourage participation and multilateral cooperation in the absence of robust enforcement mechanisms.

Restricted to first-year students admitted to the Trinity One Program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Corequisite: TRN161Y1/ TRN162Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3), Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

TRN161Y1 - Making Public Policy Work

TRN161Y1 - Making Public Policy Work
Hours: 48S

How do we know what kinds of public policy will work and what will not? How do we assess the effectiveness of a policy? An historical examination of ways in which Canadian governments have addressed a range of policy problems. Case studies of areas of federal and provincial activity today. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Admission to Trinity One
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN162Y1 - Political Economy and Social Inequality

TRN162Y1 - Political Economy and Social Inequality
Hours: 48S

What is the relationship between capitalism and democracy? How can understanding rational choice theory inform public policy? This course will introduce students to the methods of studying the interplay between economics and politics. We will focus on specific topics to guide our quantitative analysis, which may include intergenerational poverty, the transfer of wealth, efficiency, and social stratification. We will analyse empirical results while developing critical skills for interpreting economic data and research. The course also considers global economic dynamics, transnational governance regimes, as well as the political-economic dimensions of setting global policies. By the end of the course, students will have a better understanding of global political economy, and its connection the fields of international relations and public policy.

Restricted to first-year students admitted to the Trinity One Program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Corequisite: TRN160Y1
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2), Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN170Y1 - Ethics and the Creative Imagination

TRN170Y1 - Ethics and the Creative Imagination
Hours: 48S

A seminar course that explores ethical issues through the study of works of the creative imagination that pose or provoke questions of right and wrong, good and evil, justice and injustice. The selected works will be drawn from such fields as literature, film, and the visual and performing arts. Open only to students admitted to Trinity One. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Admission to Trinity One
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1), Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

TRN171Y1 - Ethics and the Public Sphere

TRN171Y1 - Ethics and the Public Sphere
Hours: 48S

What does it mean to be morally required to do something? What rights do we have over ourselves, our bodies, our privacy, our choices? In this course, we will read texts from philosophy, history, political science, cultural studies and beyond that engage with the theme of ethics in the public arena. These will provide valuable analytic tools as we go on to confront contemporary issues that raise urgent ethical questions. Restricted to first-year students admitted to the Trinity One Program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Corequisite: TRN172Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3), Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

TRN172Y1 - Ethics and the Law

TRN172Y1 - Ethics and the Law
Hours: 48S

What is the relationship between moral values and the law? What role does the law play in enabling people to live better lives? Are legal institutions and actors subject to higher ethical standards? In this course we will read texts from legal theory and political philosophy to try to explain the connection between ethics and the law. This will provide the basis for thinking about some historical and contemporary legal cases, as well as ethical issues judges, lawyers, and lawmakers face in their professional roles. Restricted to first-year students admitted to the Trinity One Program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Corequisite: TRN171Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2), Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN225Y1 - The Art of Health Science Discovery

TRN225Y1 - The Art of Health Science Discovery
Hours: 48S

Illustrated by contemporary examples, students go through the stages of the scientific discovery process. From initial idea, through literature review, funding (grant writing and assessment), experimental design and critical analysis of data through to the public dissemination of results by publication, the patent process and development of intellectual property. Restricted to students admitted to the Trinity One Program.

Corequisite: TRN125Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4), Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN235H1 - Health Policy in Canada: Past, Present and Future

TRN235H1 - Health Policy in Canada: Past, Present and Future
Hours: 24S

This course explores the nature and impact of public health policy in Canada. The course describes the origins of Canadian health policy, its evolution towards its current form and the choices resulting from aging populations and the increasing costs associated with a high standard of health care.

Prerequisite: TRN135Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN236H1 - The Politics of Global Health

TRN236H1 - The Politics of Global Health
Hours: 24S

This course explores the nature and impact of policy relationships designed to improve global public health. We explore the analytical tools necessary to study these institutional arrangements and examine successes and failures of these policy relationships across a range of global health policy challenges including infectious disease and child health.

Prerequisite: TRN135Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Ethics, Society and Law

TRN203H1 - Society, its Limits and Possibilities

TRN203H1 - Society, its Limits and Possibilities
Hours: 24L/12T

Key texts from various disciplines that articulate fundamental features, limitations, and possibilities of contemporary society are introduced. Political consent, economics, governmental administration, the global / post-colonial world, historical transformation, gender politics, and media may be addressed.

Prerequisite: Active in ASMAJ1618
Exclusion: TRN321H1 taken in 2015 Fall
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN204H1 - Introduction to Law and Legal Reasoning

TRN204H1 - Introduction to Law and Legal Reasoning
Hours: 24L/12T

This course introduces students to legal reasoning through progressively complex exercises. First, hypotheticals expose students to basic skills required for legal reasoning. Second, they analyze simplified versions of specially selected concrete cases. Third, the course analyses real cases discussed in first year courses in law school.

Prerequisite: Active in ASMAJ1618
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN303H1 - Ethics and Society

TRN303H1 - Ethics and Society
Hours: 24S

An exploration of the ethical dimensions of selected contemporary social issues. Restricted to students in the major program Ethics, Society, and Law.

Prerequisite: TRN203H1 and active in ASMAJ1618
Recommended Preparation: PHL271H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

TRN304Y1 - Law and Social Issues

TRN304Y1 - Law and Social Issues
Hours: 48L

An exploration of the legal dimensions of selected contemporary social issues, focusing on law as a practice of social justice, and led by instructors with considerable practical experience. Restricted to students in the major program Ethics, Society, and Law.

Prerequisite: Active in ASMAJ1618
Exclusion: TRN304H1
Recommended Preparation: PHL271H1, TRN204H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN304H1 - Law and Social Issues

TRN304H1 - Law and Social Issues
Hours: 24L

An exploration of the legal dimensions of selected contemporary social issues. Restricted to students in the major program Ethics, Society, and Law.

Prerequisite: Active in ASMAJ1618
Exclusion: TRN304Y1
Recommended Preparation: PHL271H1, TRN204H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN305Y1 - Basic Principles of Law

TRN305Y1 - Basic Principles of Law
Hours: 48L

The nature and justification of legal rules as preparation for the study of basic principles of law governing the relations between individual citizens, and the relations between individual citizens and the state. A selection of contract, tort, criminal and administrative law. Restricted to students in the major program Ethics, Society, and Law.

Prerequisite: Active in ASMAJ1618 only if enrolling in the Fall/Winter session. A student must be in third or fourth year.
Exclusion: TRN305H1
Recommended Preparation: TRN204H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN305H1 - Basic Principles of Law

TRN305H1 - Basic Principles of Law
Hours: 24L

An exploration of some basic legal principles in public and private law. Areas of law that may be studied include contract, tort, criminal and administrative law. Restricted to students in the major program Ethics, Society, and Law.

Prerequisite: Active in ASMAJ1618. A student must be in third or fourth year.
Exclusion: TRN305Y1
Recommended Preparation: PHL271H1, TRN204H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN312H1 - Sustainability Issues in Ethics, Society, and Law

TRN312H1 - Sustainability Issues in Ethics, Society, and Law
Hours: 24L/12T

This course focuses on core issues selected from the general domain of sustainability which are addressed through each of the three subject-area lenses of Trinity’s Ethics, Society, and Law program, namely the ethics, the socio-political context, and the legal environment of sustainability issues and initiatives.

Prerequisite: TRN203H1, TRN204H1
Exclusion: TRN321H1 (Selected Topics in Ethics, Society, and Law: The Ethics, Society and Law of Environmental Sustainability), offered in Winter 2020
Recommended Preparation: PHL271H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN320H1 - Selected Topics in Ethics, Society, and Law

TRN320H1 - Selected Topics in Ethics, Society, and Law
Hours: 24S

The course examines a selected topic in ethics, society, and law. The set of topics will be based on the research interests of an individual instructor. Both the topics and the instructor may change with each offering of the course, and the course is not expected to be offered every year.

Prerequisite: Enrolment in ASMAJ1618. A student must be in third or fourth year.
Recommended Preparation: PHL271H1, TRN203H1, TRN204H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities, Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN321H1 - Selected Topics in Ethics, Society, and Law

TRN321H1 - Selected Topics in Ethics, Society, and Law
Hours: 24S

The course examines a set of selected topics in ethics, society, and law. The topics will be based on the research interests of an individual instructor. Both the topics and the instructor may change with each offering of the course, and the course is not expected to be offered every year.

Prerequisite: Enrolment in ASMAJ1618. A student must be in third or fourth year.
Recommended Preparation: PHL271H1, TRN203H1, TRN204H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities, Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

TRN406H1 - Community Research Partnerships in Ethics

TRN406H1 - Community Research Partnerships in Ethics

Students undertake research projects designed to meet the knowledge needs of ethics-oriented organizations in the broader community.

Prerequisite: Students must be in the final year of registration in the Major Program in Ethics, Society, and Law and will normally have a CGPA of at least 3.70. Enrolment is by application. Consult the Arts & Science Registration Instructions and Timetable at http://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/course for course enrolment procedures.
Recommended Preparation: PHL271H1, TRN203H1, TRN204H1, TRN303H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

TRN407Y1 - Community Research Partnerships in Ethics

TRN407Y1 - Community Research Partnerships in Ethics

Students undertake research projects designed to meet the knowledge needs of ethics-oriented organizations in the broader community.

Prerequisite: TRN303H1. Students must be in the final year of registration in the Major Program in Ethics, Society, and Law and will normally have a CGPA of at least 3.70. Enrolment is by invitation. Consult the Arts & Science course enrolment web page at https://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/academics/course-enrolment for enrolment procedures.
Recommended Preparation: PHL271H1, TRN203H1, TRN204H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

TRN412H1 - Seminar in Ethics, Society, and Law

TRN412H1 - Seminar in Ethics, Society, and Law
Hours: 24S

Capstone Seminar in Ethics, Society, and Law. Students must be in their final year of registration in the Major Program: Ethics, Society and Law. For detailed description of topics, please visit https://www.trinity.utoronto.ca/study-arts-science/ethics-society-law/courses-program-requirements/.

Students are not eligible to enrol in this course more than once, for credit.

Prerequisite: TRN303H1
Recommended Preparation: PHL271H1, TRN203H1, TRN204H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

TRN425Y1 - Law Workshops Course

TRN425Y1 - Law Workshops Course

Students attend workshops in the Faculty of Law, meet for related discussion and complete related assignments. Enrolment is restricted to qualified fourth-year students registered in the Major Program Ethics, Society, and Law.

Prerequisite: TRN303H1. Enrolment is by invitation. Consult the Arts & Science Registration Instructions and Timetable. Students must be in the final year of registration in the Major Program in Ethics, Society, and Law and will normally have strong performance in 300-level courses in Ethics, Society and Law.
Recommended Preparation: PHL271H1, TRN203H1, TRN204H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Independent Studies

TRN205H1 - Independent Studies

TRN205H1 - Independent Studies

Trinity Independent Studies. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities

TRN299Y1 - Research Opportunity Program

TRN299Y1 - Research Opportunity Program

Credit course for supervised participation in faculty research project. Details at https://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/academics/research-opportunities/research-opportunities-program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Application through the Research Opportunity Program (ROP); selection by the instructor.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

TRN299H1 - Research Opportunity Program

TRN299H1 - Research Opportunity Program

Credit course for supervised participation in faculty research project. Details at https://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/academics/research-opportunities/research-opportunities-program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Application through the Research Opportunity Program (ROP); selection by the instructor.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

TRN300H1 - Trinity Independent Studies

TRN300H1 - Trinity Independent Studies

Trinity Independent Studies. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities

TRN301Y1 - Trinity Independent Studies

TRN301Y1 - Trinity Independent Studies

Trinity Independent Studies. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities

TRN302Y1 - Trinity Independent Studies

TRN302Y1 - Trinity Independent Studies

Trinity Independent Studies. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities

TRN399Y1 - Research Opportunity Program

TRN399Y1 - Research Opportunity Program

Credit course for supervised participation in faculty research project. Details at https://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/academics/research-opportunities/research-opportunities-program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

TRN399H1 - Research Opportunity Program

TRN399H1 - Research Opportunity Program

Credit course for supervised participation in faculty research project. Details at https://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/academics/research-opportunities/research-opportunities-program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Application through the Research Opportunity Program (ROP); selection by the instructor.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

TRN400H1 - Trinity Independent Studies

TRN400H1 - Trinity Independent Studies

Trinity Independent Studies. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities

TRN404Y1 - Trinity Independent Studies

TRN404Y1 - Trinity Independent Studies

Trinity Independent Studies. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities

TRN405Y1 - Trinity Independent Studies

TRN405Y1 - Trinity Independent Studies

Trinity Independent Studies. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities

International Relations

TRN250Y1 - Empire, Nationalism, and the History of International Relations

TRN250Y1 - Empire, Nationalism, and the History of International Relations
Hours: 24L/48T

Our modern world has its foundations in the development of a complex and changing system of international behaviours, customs, and rules. This course explores the global and often difficult transition from a world of empires to our contemporary world of nation-states, spanning the mid-eighteenth century to the present day. Using a global lens, this course offers an introductory historical survey using multiple perspectives and diverse settings, paying special attention to the dissolution of empire, popular revolution and mass movements, and the creation of international order. How global transformations were experienced, not only at the highest levels of power, but also by the people living amidst such change, will be an abiding concern of this course.

Prerequisite: Admission to International Relations Major or Specialist program
Recommended Preparation: Prerequisite courses for entry into International Relations Major or Specialist Program
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3), Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

TRN350H1 - Scarcity, Sustainability, and the Future of International Relations

TRN350H1 - Scarcity, Sustainability, and the Future of International Relations
Hours: 24L/12T

International Relations are changing, and changing quickly. Major challenges in global affairs, including the interrelated problems of climate change, resource scarcity, great power competition, and changes in mass politics will shape our future in uncertain and possibly dangerous ways. This course seeks to evaluate the effect of these interconnected issues on our world today, and their implications for the future. Through a series of case studies, students will be encouraged to identify future international challenges and work to develop sustainable and innovative solutions to the problems that will confront our world in the next decades and beyond.

Prerequisite: TRN250Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN409Y1 - Selected Topics in International Studies

TRN409Y1 - Selected Topics in International Studies

Selected Topics in International Studies

Prerequisite: Enrolment in the International Relations program or in a History or Political Science major or specialist program
Exclusion: TRN409H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN409H1 - Selected Topics in International Studies

TRN409H1 - Selected Topics in International Studies

Selected Topics in International Studies

Prerequisite: Enrolment in the International Relations program or in a History or Political Science major or specialist program
Exclusion: TRN409Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN410H1 - Researching Critical Cases in Contemporary International Relations

TRN410H1 - Researching Critical Cases in Contemporary International Relations

This course allows students with majors in International Relations to apply some of the techniques and skills they have developed during their undergraduate careers to an original research project. The course introduces several theoretical and methodological tools that are used to understand and analyze a variety of major developments affecting contemporary international relations. Students will examine the strengths and weaknesses of each research method and apply those that are most appropriate to their own IR study.

Prerequisite: TRN250Y1
Exclusion: TRN410Y1
Recommended Preparation: POL208Y1 or HIS344H1 are recommended as preparation or taken concurrently.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN411Y1 - Selected Topics in International Studies

TRN411Y1 - Selected Topics in International Studies

Selected Topics in International Studies

Prerequisite: Enrolment in the International Relations program or in a History major or specialist program, or permission of instructor
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

TRN419Y1 - Comparative American, British and Canadian Foreign Policy

TRN419Y1 - Comparative American, British and Canadian Foreign Policy
Hours: 48S

The origins and evolution of American, British and Canadian foreign policy from the late 18th century to the present. Policies are compared in order to understand the development of these countries as nations and actors in the international community.

Prerequisite: Students must have a background in one of Canadian, British or American history.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities, Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN421Y1 - Fragile and Conflict-Affected States in Global Politics

TRN421Y1 - Fragile and Conflict-Affected States in Global Politics
Hours: 48S

Since the end of the Cold War, fragile and conflict-affected states have been widely viewed in the international relations field as one of the preeminent challenges to international security and global governance. Western countries have typically responded to this challenge by launching interventions aimed at building new states that can be integrated into the global, liberal order. This course will dissect the liberal peacebuilding and statebuilding project and explore its broader impact and implications for the international system.

Recommended Preparation: POL300Y1 or POL343Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Other Trinity College Courses

TRN200Y1 - Modes of Reasoning

TRN200Y1 - Modes of Reasoning
Previous Course Number: TRN200H1
Hours: 24L/24S

First term: students are taught how to recognize, analyze, evaluate, and construct arguments in ordinary English prose. Second term: one or more discipline-related modes of reasoning (e.g., scientific reasoning, ethical reasoning, legal reasoning) studied with reference to a selection of contemporary social issues.

Exclusion: PHL247H1/ PHI247H1/ TRN200H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

TRN307H1 - International Experience I

TRN307H1 - International Experience I

A one semester research experience abroad. Students participate in a research project under the mentorship of a faculty supervisor in the host institution and gain experience of working and living abroad.

Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN308H1 - International Experience II

TRN308H1 - International Experience II

Students who have engaged in a research project abroad participate in a regular forum in which they present their research projects and discuss their varied experiences of work and social engagement in different foreign environments. Students prepare a detailed scholarly article based on their research.

Prerequisite: TRN307H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

TRN377Y1 - Trinity Comprehensive Paper I

TRN377Y1 - Trinity Comprehensive Paper I

Students are individually mentored by faculty experts through readings from primary literature towards preparation of a quality review article. For students in third year, students identify their faculty mentor during second year and agree to become familiar with the available textbook level material during that year in their chosen topic. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Completion of 8.0 credits and permission of the instructor
Distribution Requirements: Humanities, Science, Social Science

TRN477H1 - Trinity Comprehensive Paper II

TRN477H1 - Trinity Comprehensive Paper II

The preparation of a publication quality review article typically involves extensive editing. Students are individually mentored by faculty experts to take the review paper generated in TRN377Y1 and edit the structure, content and style to produce a publication quality review article. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: TRN377Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities, Science, Social Science

TRN478H1 - Science Writing for Non-Scientific Audiences

TRN478H1 - Science Writing for Non-Scientific Audiences

The course aims to train senior-level science students in a wide range of writing genres, focusing on a diversity of non-scientific audiences and writing styles. In addition, students learn to read and analyze texts in order to understand rhetorical strategies and devices.

Prerequisite: Students in science specialist or major programs. Permission by instructor.
Exclusion: Non-science students, first or second year students.
Recommended Preparation: TRN377Y1 (the comprehensive paper will serve as writing sample).
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

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