Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Faculty List

University Professor Emeritus
S.C.H. Barrett, BSc, PhD, FRSC, FRS

Professors Emeriti 
P.A. Abrams, BSc, PhD, FRSC 
D.R. Brooks, MS, PhD, FRSC 
T.J. Carleton, BSc, PhD 
C.S. Churcher, MSc, PhD
H. Cyr, MSc, PhD 
N.G. Dengler, MS, PhD 
D.W. Dunham, BS, PhD 
J.E. Eckenwalder, MSc, PhD 
J.B. Falls, BA, PhD CM
C.A. Goldman, MSc
M.R. Gross, BSc, PhD 
R.I.C. Hansell, BSc, PhD 
H.H. Harvey, MSc, PhD
D.A. McLennan, MSc, PhD
R.C. Plowright, MA, PhD 
H.A. Regier, MS, PhD CM
L. Rowe, BSc, PhD, FRSC
J.D. Thomson, MS, PhD, FRSC
A.E. Weis, BA, PhD
A. P. Zimmerman, BA, PhD 

University Professor
M.-J. Fortin, MSc, PhD, FRSC

Professor and Interim Associate Chair, Graduate Studies
D.A. Jackson, MSc, PhD

Distinguished Professors
A. Agrawal, BSc, PhD
J.R. Stinchcombe, BA, PhD 

University Professor and Interim Chair of the Department 
M.B. Sokolowski, BSc, PhD, FRSC

Professors
B. Chang, AB, PhD
A.D. Cutter, BSc, PhD
M.E. Frederickson, AB, PhD
F.H. Rodd, MSc, PhD
R.F. Sage, MS, PhD 
S.I. Wright, MSc, PhD

Associate Professor and Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies
N. Mideo, BSc, PhD

Associate Professors 
J-B. Caron, MSc, PhD 
D.C. Currie, BSc, PhD 
C. Darling, MSc, PhD 
M.E. Engstrom, MSc, PhD 
D. Evans, BSc, PhD 
B. Gilbert, MSc, PhD
M. Krkosek, BSc, PhD
D.L. Mahler, BA, PhD
T.L. Sage, MS, PhD 
N. Rollinson, MSc, PhD

Assistant Professors
C.B. Baines, MSc, PhD
M. Bontrager, BSc, PhD
S. Brothers, MSc, PhD
S. Claramunt, BSc, PhD
S.B. Kvist, MS, PhD 
N.K. Lujan, BSc, PhD
M.M. Osmond, MSc, PhD
T. Parins-Fukuchi, BSc, PhD
C.M. Rochman, BSc, PhD
J. Sztepanacz, MSc, PhD

Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream
S. Riskin, BA, PhD

Introduction

Ecology and evolutionary biology (EEB) seeks to understand the origins, diversity, and distribution of organisms. All life evolves. All life sciences, along with evidence-based stewardship of life on planet Earth, depend on understanding the factors that influence the origin and maintenance of biological diversity − from genomes to ecosystems. Understanding EEB helps society to make informed decisions about sustainable development, global climate change, invasive species, harvested natural resources, preservation of biodiversity, genetic diversity and ecosystem integrity, control of herbicide and pesticide resistance, antibiotic and drug resistance, and emerging infectious diseases.

Students exposed to these subjects come to realize that the ecological and evolutionary underpinnings of life pose a constellation of engaging scientific problems that are both intellectually challenging and critical to humanity’s future. EEB graduates go on to successful careers in data science, research, medicine and healthcare, government ministries like MNR and DFO, environmental and conservation NGO’s and consulting firms, and many other industries. As members of one of the highest ranked EEB departments in the world and the largest EEB department in Canada, EEB students are uniquely positioned to enhance their scientific literacy as the future decision-makers and knowledge-creators in society.

The EEB Department offers a diverse collection of over 50 courses that explore biological diversity, conservation biology, molecular evolution, population and quantitative genetics, computational and statistical data analysis, genomics, animal behaviour, the ecology of populations, communities, and ecosystems, mathematical theory in biology, environmental biology, and systematics. EEB faculty include Curators from the Royal Ontario Museum. Students participate in diverse learning environments within EEB courses: hands-on bench and computer lab practicals, field trips, off-campus field courses in Ontario and internationally, small-class discussion seminars, and independent research projects with world-leading faculty researchers. Students enrolled in EEB courses and programs become part of a welcoming and supportive community of scholars.

The EEB Department offers six core programs of study: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology (Specialist and Major), Biodiversity & Conservation Biology (Major), Environmental Biology (Major and Minor) and Quantitative Biology (Major). Students enrolled in EEB programs are invited to participate in the Arts & Science's Second-Year Learning Communities, or SLCs, that bring together a small group of second-year students who have a similar academic focus and belong to the same department, and to attend the EEB Info Session Series for advising about career options, applying for scholarships and grad school, and seeking out research opportunities.

Students with questions and advising needs about EEB-sponsored programs are encouraged to visit the departmental website https://eeb.utoronto.ca/education/undergraduate/ or to contact the EEB Undergraduate Office, Earth Sciences Centre (25 Willcocks St.), Room 3055B, undergrad.eeb@utoronto.ca, 416-978-2084.

The EEB Department also jointly offers multi-department programs: Specialist, Major, and Minor programs in general Biology (with Cell & Systems Biology), a Major program in Genome Biology (with Cell & Systems Biology and Molecular Genetics & Microbiology), and a Specialist program in Bioinformatics & Computational Biology (with Cell & Systems Biology, Biochemistry, Molecular Genetics & Microbiology, and Computer Science). Students requiring more information about these programs and their course requirements should consult the Biology Calendar page.

 

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Program Goals

Ecologists and evolutionary biologists recognize that all life has evolved and that an understanding of the factors influencing the origin and maintenance of biological diversity − from genomes to ecosystems − underlies all life sciences and is critical to our stewardship of life on this planet. EEB aims to produce citizens who are literate in the ecological and evolutionary principles that form the foundation for understanding life on Earth, how human and natural factors influence nature, and how changes to nature influence public health, the economy, and other societal priorities. The EEB-sponsored programs of study prepare students in these foundations of life science for future careers in data science, research, medicine and healthcare, government agencies like MNR and DFO, environmental and conservation NGOs, and many other industries.

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Programs

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Specialist (Science Program) - ASSPE1006

The Ecology & Evolutionary Biology Specialist program (12.0 credits) provides an in-depth understanding of ecological and evolutionary patterns and processes, as well as the diversity of life forms (microbes, fungi, plants, animals). Concepts are taught using a broad array of approaches, including molecular studies, laboratory experiments, computer and mathematical modeling, and field studies. An integral part of the experience is to conduct independent research projects in the laboratory and/or field. There is a strong emphasis within the program on hands-on laboratory and fieldwork that complement the conceptual framework developed in lectures. Students in this program have the opportunity to concentrate in ecology, evolutionary biology, or behaviour.

Enrolment Requirements:

This is an open enrolment program. A student who has completed 4.0 credits may enrol in the program.

Completion Requirements:

(12.0 credits including at least 4.0 credits at the 300+ level, 1.0 of which must be at the 400-level)

First Year (3.0 credits): BIO120H1; BIO130H1; ( CHM135H1, CHM136H1)/ CHM151Y1; ( MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1

1. 2.0 credits: BIO220H1 (ecology and evolutionary biology); BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1 (molecular and cell biology); BIO260H1/​ HMB265H1 (genetics); BIO251H1/​ BIO270H1/​ PSL300H1/​ EEB240H1 (plant or animal form and function/environmental biology).

2. 0.5 credit in computational science from: EEB125H1(recommended)/ CSC108H1/​ CSC120H1/​ CSC148H1/​ CSC110Y1, and 0.5 credit in statistics from: EEB225H1(recommended)/ STA220H1/​ STA257H1/​ STA288H1/​ GGR270H1/​ PSY201H1

3. 0.5 credit in core evolution from: EEB318H1, EEB323H1, EEB362H1

4. 0.5 credit in core ecology from: EEB319H1, EEB320H1, EEB321H1, EEB328H1

5. 0.5 credit in organismal biology from: EEB263H1, EEB266H1, EEB267H1, EEB268H1, EEB331H1, EEB340H1, EEB380H1, EEB382H1, EEB384H1, EEB386H1, EEB388H1

6. 1.0 credit at 300+ level, from: EEB313H1, EEB318H1, EEB319H1, EEB320H1, EEB321H1, EEB322H1, EEB323H1, EEB324H1, EEB325H1, EEB328H1, EEB331H1, EEB340H1, EEB356H1, EEB362H1, EEB365H1, EEB380H1, EEB382H1, EEB384H1, EEB386H1, EEB388H1, EEB390H1, EEB398H0, EEB399Y0, EEB428H1, EEB430H1, EEB433H1, EEB434H1, EEB440H1, EEB441H1, EEB455H1, EEB458H1, EEB459H1, EEB460H1, EEB463H1, EEB465H1, EEB466H1, EEB491H1, EEB495H1; EHJ352H1; ENV432H1; ENV395Y1

Sub-total = 8.5 credits

7. 1.0 to 1.5 credits in at least two of the three following categories: (1) one field course (0.5 credit) from EEB403H0, EEB403H1, EEB405H0, EEB405H1, EEB406H0, EEB406H1, EEB410H0, EEB410H1; (2) one seminar (0.5 credit) from EEB491H1, EEB495H1; and/or (3) one independent research course (0.5 credit) from EEB497H1/​ (1.0 credit) from EEB498Y1

Sub-total = 9.5 or 10.0 credits (depending on options chosen in #7)

8. Select the remaining credits for a total of 12.0 credits (at least 1.0 must be 300+ series if 1.0 credit is completed in #7 above) from: BIO251H1, BIO270H1/​ PSL300H1, BIO271H1/​ PSL301H1; all EEB courses (excluding EEB196H1, EEB197H1, EEB198H1, EEB199H1, EEB202H1, EEB208H1, EEB214H1, EEB215H1); EHJ352H1; ENV432H1; JHE353H1, JHE355H1; and no more than 1.0 credit from the following (note that some courses may require prerequisites that are not listed within this program): ANT336H1, ANT333Y1, ANT335Y1, ANT338H1, ANT430H1, ANT436H1; CSB328H1, CSB340H1, CSB349H1, CSB350H1, CSB352H1, CSB353H1, CSB430H1, CSB431H1, CSB452H1, CSB458H1, CSB472H1, CSB474H1; ENV346H1; FOR200H1, FOR201H1, FOR301H1, FOR306H1, FOR307H1, FOR413H1, FOR416H1, FOR417H1, FOR418H1; GGR201H1, GGR203H1, GGR205H1, GGR206H1, GGR272H1, GGR273H1, GGR305H1, GGR307H1, GGR308H1; MAT221H1; MGY340H1; PSY100H1, PSY260H1, PSY270H1, PSY280H1, PSY290H1, PSY305H1, PSY390H1, PSY397H1, PSY474H1, PSY492H1, PSY497H1 (note that many PSY courses have limited enrolment)

Total = 12.0 credits

NOTE: Students may wish to concentrate in ecology, evolutionary biology, or behaviour. Recommended EEB, EHJ and JHE courses for these concentrations are as follows:

Ecology: EEB255H1, EEB319H1, EEB320H1, EEB321H1, EEB328H1, EEB365H1, EEB428H1, EEB433H1, EEB434H1, EEB440H1, EEB465H1, EEB495H1; ENV432H1
Evolutionary Biology: EEB323H1, EEB324H1, EEB325H1, EEB362H1, EEB390H1, EEB440H1, EEB441H1, EEB459H1, EEB460H1; EHJ352H1; JHE353H1, JHE355H1
Behaviour: EEB322H1, EEB455H1

Biodiversity and Conservation Biology Major (Science Program) - ASMAJ0110

In today’s era of unprecedented global change, natural ecosystems are under attack and thousands of species are threatened with extinction and many more have experienced unprecedented declines. Students in the Biodiversity & Conservation Biology Major program (8.0 credits) will be equipped to aid in the response to what is perhaps humanity’s most pressing challenge, the conservation of biological diversity. Students in this program take courses in their first and second years that provide foundations in ecology, evolutionary biology, biodiversity and conservation biology, environmental biology, mathematics, and statistics. In their upper years students will obtain in-depth knowledge about the diversity of living organisms and take advanced courses in ecology, evolution, and biodiversity and conservation biology.

Enrolment Requirements:

This is an open enrolment program. A student who has completed 4.0 credits may enrol in the program.

Completion Requirements:

(8.0 credits including at least 2.0 credits at 300+ level with at least 0.5 credit at the 400 level)

First Year (1.0 credit): BIO120H1; EEB125H1/​ MAT135H1/​ MAT137Y1/​ MAT221H1/​ MAT223H1

Higher Years:

1. 2.0 credits: BIO220H1 (ecology and evolutionary biology); EEB225H1 (recommended)/ STA220H1/​ STA257H1/​ STA288H1/​ GGR270H1/​ PSY201H1 (statistics); EEB255H1 (conservation biology); EEB240H1 (environmental biology).

2. 1.5 credits from: BIO251H1; EEB263H1, EEB266H1, EEB267H1, EEB268H1, EEB340H1, EEB380H1, EEB382H1, EEB384H1, EEB386H1, EEB388H1; FOR305H1

3. 0.5 credit in core evolution: EEB318H1, EEB323H1, EEB362H1

4. 0.5 credit in core ecology from: EEB319H1, EEB320H1, EEB321H1, EEB328H1

5. 0.5 credit: EEB365H1 (applied conservation biology)

6. 1.5 credits from: BIO130H1, BIO251H1; EEB263H1, EEB266H1, EEB267H1, EEB268H1, EEB313H1, EEB318H1, EEB319H1, EEB320H1, EEB321H1, EEB322H1, EEB323H1, EEB324H1, EEB325H1, EEB328H1, EEB331H1, EEB340H1, EEB362H1, EEB380H1, EEB382H1, EEB384H1, EEB386H1, EEB388H1, EEB390H1, EEB397Y1, EEB398H0, EEB399Y0, EEB428H1, EEB430H1, EEB433H1, EEB434H1, EEB440H1, EEB441H1, EEB455H1, EEB458H1, EEB459H1, EEB463H1, EEB491H1, EEB495H1, EEB497H1, EEB498Y1, EEB499Y1; EHJ352H1; ENV432H1; FOR200H1, FOR201H1, FOR307H1, FOR413H1; GGR272H1, JHE353H1, JHE355H1

7. 0.5 credit: EEB 400-series level course

Ecology & Evolutionary Biology Major (Science Program) - ASMAJ1006

The Ecology & Evolutionary Biology Major program (8.0 credits) provides a comprehensive understanding of ecological and evolutionary patterns and processes, as well as the diversity of life forms (microbes, fungi, plants, animals). Concepts are taught using a broad array of approaches, including molecular studies, laboratory experiments, computer and mathematical modeling, and field studies. An integral part of the experience is to conduct independent research projects in the laboratory and/or field. There is a strong emphasis within the program on hands-on laboratory and fieldwork that complement the conceptual framework developed in lectures.

Enrolment Requirements:

This is an open enrolment program. A student who has completed 4.0 credits may enrol in the program.

Completion Requirements:

(8.0 credits including at least 2.0 credits at 300+ series with at least 0.5 credit at the 400-series)

First Year (2.0 credits): BIO120H1; BIO130H1; ( CHM135H1, CHM136H1)/ CHM151Y1/​ ( MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1

Higher Years:

1. 2.0 credits: BIO220H1; BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1; BIO260H1/​ HMB265H1; EEB225H1/​ STA220H1/​ STA257H1/​ STA288H1/​ GGR270H1/​ PSY201H1

2. 1.0 credit from: BIO251H1, BIO270H1/​ PSL300H1, BIO271H1/​ PSL301H1, EEB263H1, EEB266H1, EEB267H1, EEB268H1, EEB240H1

3. 0.5 credit in core ecology and evolution from: EEB318H1, EEB319H1, EEB320H1, EEB321H1, EEB322H1, EEB328H1, EEB362H1

4. 1.5 credits from: EEB313H1, EEB318H1, EEB319H1, EEB320H1, EEB321H1, EEB322H1, EEB323H1, EEB324H1, EEB325H1, EEB328H1, EEB331H1, EEB362H1, EEB365H1, EEB380H1, EEB382H1, EEB384H1, EEB386H1, EEB388H1, EEB390H1, EEB397Y1, EEB398H0, EEB398Y0, EEB399Y1, EEB428H1, EEB430H1, EEB433H1, EEB434H1, EEB440H1, EEB441H1, EEB455H1, EEB458H1, EEB459H1, EEB460H1, EEB463H1, EEB465H1, EEB466H1 ; EHJ352H1; ENV432H1; PSY305H1

5. 0.5 credit from: BIO251H1; BIO270H1/​ PSL300H1; BIO271H1/​ PSL301H1; EEB (excluding EEB196H1, EEB197H1, EEB198H1, EEB199H1, EEB202H1, EEB208H1, EEB214H1, EEB215H1); ENV234H1, ENV334H1, ENV432H1; EHJ352H1; JHE353H1, JHE355H1; MAT135H1/​ MAT136H1/​ MAT137Y1/​ MAT221H1/​ MAT223H1; MGY340H1

6. 0.5 credit at the 400-series from: field course, EEB403H0, EEB403H1, EEB405H0, EEB405H1, EEB406H0, EEB406H1, EEB410H0, EEB410H1; seminar EEB491H1, EEB495H1; independent research project course, EEB497H1, EEB498Y1 (concurrent with research issues course EEB488H1), EEB499Y1; advanced lecture/discussion course, EEB428H1, EEB430H1, EEB433H1, EEB440H1, EEB455H1, EEB459H1, EEB460H1, EEB465H1, EEB466H1; ENV432H1

Environmental Biology Major (Science Program) - ASMAJ1390

Environmental science is an interdisciplinary field that integrates biological, chemical, and physical sciences to study human interactions with their environment. The Environmental Biology Major program (8.0 credits) provides a broad background in biology that is essential to understand the impact of humans on other organisms and their environments. It provides students with an understanding of ecology, the diversity and function of living organisms, the physical and chemical environment, and the ways organisms interact with, and affect, ecosystem processes. Students are exposed to ecosystem management, issues related to environmental change, and the consequences of interactions between humans and the environment.

Enrolment Requirements:

This is an open enrolment program. A student who has completed 4.0 credits may enrol in the program.

Completion Requirements:

(8.0 credits including at least 2.0 credits at 300+ level with at least 0.5 credit at the 400-level)

First Year (2.0 credits): BIO120H1; ( CHM135H1, CHM136H1)/ CHM151Y1; MAT135H1/​ MAT136H1/​ MAT137Y1/​ MAT221H1/​ MAT223H1 or PHY131H1/​ PHY151H1 or BIO130H1 or EEB125H1

1. 1.5 credits: BIO220H1 (ecology and evolutionary biology); EEB240H1 (environmental biology); EEB225H1 (recommended)/ STA220H1/​ STA257H1/​ STA288H1/​ GGR270H1/​ PSY201H1 (statistics)

2. 0.5 credit in biological diversity and function from: BIO251H1, BIO270H1; EEB266H1, EEB267H1, EEB268H1, EEB340H1; BIO260H1/​ HMB265H1 (note that both require BIO130H1 and BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1)

3. 0.5 credit in physical environment from: CHM210H1; ENV237H1, ENV238H1; ESS223H1, ESS261H1, ESS262H1; GGR201H1, GGR203H1, GGR205H1, GGR206H1; PHY131H1, PHY132H1, PHY151H1, PHY152H1

4. 1.0 credit in core ecology from: EEB319H1, EEB320H1, EEB321H1, EEB322H1, EEB324H1, EEB328H1

5. 2.0 credits from: EEB313H1, EEB319H1, EEB320H1, EEB321H1, EEB322H1, EEB323H1, EEB324H1, EEB325H1, EEB328H1, EEB365H1, EEB386H1, EEB403H0, EEB403H1, EEB405H0, EEB405H1, EEB406H0, EEB406H1, EEB410H0, EEB410H1, EEB428H1, EEB430H1, EEB433H1, EEB434H1, EEB441H1, EEB458H1, EEB463H1, EEB497H1, EEB498Y1, EEB499Y1; ENV316H1, ENV337H1, ENV432H1, ENV452H1; ESS311H1, ESS361H1, ESS362H1, ESS462H1, ESS463H1, ESS464H1; FOR305H1, FOR307H1, FOR418H1; GGR305H1, GGR307H1, GGR308H1; JFG470H1

6. 0.5 credit at the 400-level from: field course EEB403H0, EEB403H1, EEB405H0, EEB405H1, EEB406H0, EEB406H1, EEB410H0, EEB410H1/​ FOR418H1; seminar/lecture course EEB428H1, EEB430H1, EEB433H1, EEB491H1, EEB495H1, ENV432H1, ENV452H1; ESS462H1, ESS463H1, ESS464H1; JFG470H1; EEB497H1, independent research project course EEB498Y1 (concurrent with research issues course EEB488H1), EEB499Y1

This program can be combined with other Environmental programs (see School of the Environment), as well as Science (e.g., Chemistry, Earth Sciences) and Social Science (e.g., Economics) programs.

Environmental Biology Minor (Science Program) - ASMIN1390

Environmental science is an interdisciplinary field that integrates biological, chemical, and physical sciences to study human interactions with their environment. The Environmental Biology Minor program (4.0 credits) provides students an introduction to biology that is essential to understand the impact of humans on other organisms and their environments. It provides students with an understanding of ecology, the diversity and function of living organisms, the physical and chemical environment, and the ways organisms interact with, and affect, ecosystem processes. Students are exposed to ecosystem management, issues related to environmental change, and the consequences of interactions between humans and the environment.

Enrolment Requirements:

This is an open enrolment program. A student who has completed 4.0 credits may enrol in the program.

Completion Requirements:

(4.0 credits; must include at least 1.0 credit at the 300+ level)

1. 1.5 credits: BIO120H1, BIO220H1, EEB240H1

2. 0.5 credit in organismal biology: EEB266H1/​ EEB267H1/​ EEB268H1

3. 2.0 credits from the following groups:

A. core ecology and evolution (no more than 0.5 credit): EEB318H1, EEB319H1, EEB320H1, EEB321H1, EEB322H1, EEB324H1, EEB328H1

B. biological diversity (no more than 0.5 credit): EEB263H1, EEB266H1, EEB267H1, EEB268H1, EEB331H1, EEB340H1, EEB380H1, EEB382H1, EEB384H1, EEB386H1, EEB388H1

C. field courses (no more than 0.5 credit): EEB403H0, EEB403H1, EEB405H0, EEB405H1, EEB406H0, EEB406H1, EEB410H0, EEB410H1

D. no more than 0.5 credit from: BIO251H1, EEB255H1, EEB362H1, EEB365H1, EEB428H1, EEB433H1, EEB434H1; ENV432H1

Quantitative Biology Major (Science Program) - ASMAJ2368

The Quantitative Biology Major program (8.0 credits) is designed for students with a deep interest in biology who wish to gain a strong grounding in quantitative methods and their application to biological questions. More than ever, advancements in biology, from the molecular through the organismal to the ecosystem level, require quantitative thinking and skills along with a strong understanding of biological processes. Interdisciplinary research that draws from the natural sciences, mathematics, statistics and computer science, is an important aspect of modern biology. This major provides foundations in biology and quantitative approaches used to test and advance biological knowledge, and is appropriate for students who wish to pursue a career or graduate studies in a broad range of life sciences, ranging from biomedical to conservation to epidemiology.

The program is delivered through a mixture of classroom-learning and applied laboratory teaching, with an emphasis on understanding how quantitative methods inform our understanding of biology, and how they can be applied to test and develop new hypotheses. Students also have access to independent research opportunities that enhance professional skills, science communication, and the development and application of knowledge in quantitative biology.

Quantitative Biology Major students have priority enrollment in EEB courses, but not in courses offered by other departments, such as STA, MAT, CSC, CSB and BCB. Students should be aware that some courses listed have prerequisites that are not listed below. For students intending to pursue graduate studies, it is strongly recommended that an independent research course such as EEB498Y1 be included as part of the Quantitative Biology major.

Enrolment Requirements:

This is a limited enrolment program. Students must have completed 4.0 credits and meet the requirements listed below to enrol.

Completed courses (with minimum grades)
The following courses with the stated minimum grades are required:

Completion Requirements:

(8.0 credits including at least 2.0 credits at the 300+ level, 0.5 of which must be at the 400 level)

First Year (2.5 credits):
BIO120H1, BIO130H1, EEB125H1/​ CSC108H1/​ CSC120H1/​ CSC148H1/​ CSC110Y1, ( MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1

Higher Years (5.5 credits):

  1. 1.5 credits: BIO220H1, BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1, BIO260H1/​ HMB265H1
  2. 1.0 credit in introductory probability and statistics: EEB225H1, GGR270H1, PSY201H1, PSY202H1, STA220H1, STA221H1, STA237H1, STA238H1, STA247H1, STA248H1, STA255H1, STA257H1, STA261H1, STA288H1
  3. 0.5 credit in intermediate math: APM236H1, MAT221H1/​ MAT223H1, MAT224H1, MAT240H1, MAT237Y1, MAT247H1
  4. 1.0 credit from: CSB352H1, EEB319H1, EEB323H1, EEB324H1, EEB362H1, GGR337H1, GGR372H1, GGR373H1, PHY331H1
  5. 1.0 credit from: APM346H1, APM446H1, APM461H1, APM462H1, BCH441H1, CSB472H1, CSC311H1, CSC320H1, CSC336H1, CSC343H1, CSC373H1, CSC384H1, CSC401H1, CSC412H1, CSC413H1, CSC420H1, EEB313H1, EEB430H1, EEB458H1, EEB459H1, EEB460H1, EEB463H1, EEB498Y1, EEB499Y1, MAT332H1, MAT335H1, MAT344H1, MAT351Y1, MGY428H1, PHY431H1, PSY305H1, STA302H1, STA303H1, STA304H1, STA305H1, STA355H1, STA365H1, STA480H1
  6. 0.5 credit at 400 level from: BCB410H1, BCB420H1, BCH441H1, CSB435H1, CSB472H1, CSB498Y1, CSB499Y1, EEB430H1, EEB458H1, EEB459H1, EEB460H1, EEB463H1, EEB498Y1, EEB499Y1, PHY431H1, PSY474H1, STA480H1

 

General Biology Programs: see Biology

The University of Toronto has an enormous depth of faculty members on the St. George campus who conduct leading-edge research and teach courses in the biological sciences. Within the Faculty of Arts and Science, St. George campus, there is no single biology department; members of the Departments of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology (EEB) and Cell & Systems Biology (CSB) teach biology courses across the broad spectrum of introductory to advanced topics. These departments jointly offer the Biology Programs of Study to provide broad-based training in biological sciences. Students requiring more information about these programs and their course requirements should consult the Biology Calendar page.

The Biology Specialist, Major and Minor programs are administered by the Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology. Students with questions and advising needs about these programs are encouraged to visit the departmental website https://eeb.utoronto.ca/education/undergraduate/ or to contact the EEB Undergraduate Office, Earth Sciences Centre (25 Willcocks St.), Room 3055B, undergrad.eeb@utoronto.ca, 416-978-2084.

 

Co-sponsored Programs in Genomics and Informatics: see Biology

The Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology also co-sponsors the Bioinformatics & Computational Biology (Specialist) and Genome Biology (Major) programs. These programs are administered by the Department of Cell & Systems Biology. Students requiring more information about these programs and their course requirements should consult the Biology Calendar page.

 

Enrolment Requirements, First-Year Courses, Advising and Mentorship

All EEB programs have unlimited enrolment and no specific admission requirements. All students who have completed at least 4.0 credits of courses are eligible to enrol in a Program of Study (most single-semester courses are a 0.5 credit). Program completion requires 12.0-12.5 credits for a Specialist, 8.0 credits for a Major, or 4.0 credits for a Minor. To fulfill graduation degree requirements, students must complete either one Specialist, two Majors, or one Major with two Minors. Students may choose a Specialist to focus in-depth on a single subject area or may pair complementing Majors (or Minors) to customize their education and training to encompass the breadth of their interests.

Students entering their first year in the life sciences take BIO120H1 (“Adaptation and Biodiversity” offered by EEB) and BIO130H1 (“Molecular and Cell Biology” offered by CSB). These courses are taken by students who have successfully completed Grade 12 Biology (SBI4U or an equivalent course). BIO130H1 also requires Grade 12 Chemistry (SCH4U or an equivalent course). One or both of these courses are a prerequisite for almost all further courses in the life sciences. Students requiring more information about BIO120H1 please contact the BIO120 Office, Ramsay Wright Zoological Laboratories (25 Harbord St.), Room 105E, bio120@utoronto.ca

Students requiring more information about EEB programs and courses please visit the departmental website or contact the Undergraduate Office, Earth Sciences Centre (25 Willcocks St.), Room 3055B, undergrad.eeb@utoronto.ca, 416-978-2084.

EEB website: https://eeb.utoronto.ca/education/undergraduate/

Students enrolled in EEB programs are encouraged to participate in the Arts & Science's https://eeb.utoronto.ca/education/undergraduate/peer-mentorship-program-eeb-pmp/, or SLCs, that bring together a small group of second-year students who have a similar academic focus and belong to the same department, and to attend the EEB Info Session Series for advising about career options, applying for scholarships and grad school, and seeking out research opportunities. EEB students are automatically considered for >$25,000 in merit and need-based endowed scholarships annually from our department. Students in EEB courses and programs also are encouraged to seek advice from the EEB undergraduate office (undergrad.eeb@utoronto.ca).

Lab Materials Fee

Some courses in this department have a mandatory Lab Materials Fee to cover non-reusable materials. The fee for each such course is given in its course description, and will be included on the student’s invoice on ACORN.

First Year Seminars

EEB’s “first-year foundations” seminar courses (EEB196H1EEB197H1, EEB198H1, EEB199H1) are designed to provide students the opportunity to work closely with an instructor in a class of no more than 30 students. These interactive seminars are intended to stimulate the students’ curiosity and provide an opportunity to get to know a member of the professorial staff in a seminar environment during the first year of study. 

 

Ecology & Evolutionary Biology Course Goals

The EEB Department offers a diverse collection of over 50 courses that explore biological diversity, conservation biology, molecular evolution, population and quantitative genetics, computational and statistical data analysis, genomics, animal behaviour, the ecology of populations, communities, and ecosystems, mathematical theory in biology, environmental biology, and systematics. We encourage students enrolled in non-life sciences programs to take one of our many breadth courses to fulfill their distribution requirements for graduation. Students enrolled in EEB courses and programs become part of a welcoming and supportive community of scholars.

Students participate in diverse learning environments within EEB courses: hands-on bench and computer lab practical sections, field trips, off-campus field courses in Ontario and internationally, small-class discussion seminars, and independent research projects with world-leading faculty researchers. EEB faculty even include Curators from the Royal Ontario Museum. In EEB courses, students make use of leading resources at U of T, including EEB’s greenhouse Growth Facility and the Koffler Scientific Reserve. Students build skills in writing, oral presentation, teamwork, critical thinking, and technical ability in addition to expanding their factual knowledge and conceptual understanding in the biological sciences.

Breadth courses for students in programs outside of the life sciences:

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Courses

BIO120H1 - Adaptation and Biodiversity

Hours: 24L/15P

Principles and concepts of evolution and ecology related to origins of adaptation and biodiversity. Mechanisms and processes driving biological diversification illustrated from various perspectives using empirical and theoretical approaches. Topics include: genetic diversity, natural selection, speciation, physiological, population, and community ecology, maintenance of species diversity, conservation, species extinction, global environmental change, and invasion biology. A lab coat is required. (Lab Materials Fee: $26)

Prerequisite: Grade 12 Biology or equivalent. Students without high school Biology must consult the BIO120 Office (bio120@utoronto.ca)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB125H1 - Introductory Computation and Data Science for the Life and Physical Sciences

Hours: 24L/12T

Life and physical scientists increasingly use big and complex datasets to answer questions about society and the natural world. In this course, students will develop introductory programming knowledge and data acumen to explore topics drawn from biology, chemistry, physics, and psychology. Students will learn to create and run computer programs, organize ideas using data to communicate clearly to others, break a complex problem into simpler parts, apply general data science principles to specific cases, distinguish causation from correlation and coincidence, and negotiate tradeoffs between different computational and statistical approaches.

Exclusion: CSC111H1, CSC148H1, STA130H1, STA238H1, STA248H1, STA261H1, GGR274H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

EEB196H1 - Using Ecology and Evolution to Understand our World

Hours: 24L

Understand the living world by learning principles of ecology and evolution. Through discussion, scientific literature research, seminal readings, written reports and presentations, you will discover how scientists ask and answer questions in ecology and evolution. Specific topics will vary to emphasize the expertise of the instructor, with examples including: Are humans still evolving? What is causing the sixth extinction crisis and how can we protect endangered species? Are species shifting their ranges to mitigate the impacts of climate change, and should we be helping them? How do diseases evolve and can we use evolutionary tools to control diseases of concern? Why are there so many species, and do introduced species increase or lower this diversity? Can and should we use evolution to create improved species? For non-science students in all disciplines. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB197H1 - Biodiversity and the City

Hours: 24L

Most of us are urban creatures, but we as people are not the only urban creatures. In this seminar we will explore the diversity of animal and plant species comprising the ecological community that we call “Toronto”. We will learn their names, whether they are endemic (from here originally) or newcomers, general aspects of their biology that suit them to living in an urban environment, how natural selection shapes the traits similarly and differently for species in urban versus wilderness settings, and what happens when the wild and the domesticated members of the community meet one another. For non-science students in all disciplines. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB198H1 - Genes and Behaviour

Hours: 24L

In this course you will experience the new paradigm in behaviour genetic research. You will learn why the concept of a nature-nurture dichotomy is passé and that it has been replaced by a new understanding gained from animal and human research in the areas of gene by environment interaction and epigenetics. We will discuss how our genome listens to our environment and the effect this has on our health and behaviour. We will learn why our early experiences are critical for the development of our brains and our bodies. Together this new body of knowledge will help us understand how individual differences in behaviour and health arise. For non-science students in all disciplines. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB199H1 - Humans, Evolution and Ecology

Hours: 24L

Learn about the evolution and ecology of humans and other species. Through discussion, scientific literature research, seminal readings, written reports and presentations you will discover scientific answers to questions such as (topics vary among years): How did life originate? Why are there so many species? Where did humans come from? Will humans become extinct? How can we explain human DNA and human brain size? Need we worry about climate change? What is causing the sixth extinction crisis? Are there ecological limits to human population size? What will life be like in the Anthropocene? Are humans still evolving? For non-science students in all disciplines. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB202H1 - Plants and Society

Hours: 24L

The importance of plants to society. Topics include: plant biology, domestication of crop plants, plant breeding and genetic engineering, biological invasions, conservation, biodiversity and genetic resources, ecological implications of advances in modern plant science, macroevolution of plants, forest utilization. For non-science students in all years and disciplines.

Exclusion: BIO120H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB208H1 - Ecosystems and the Human Footprint

Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to the diversity of Earth’s aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems (e.g., coral reefs, lakes, tropical rainforests); the history of industrialization and human population growth; how the human footprint impacts ecosystems (e.g., ecosystem function, biological diversity); and strategies to maintain, recover and restore ecosystems. This is a course for non-science students in all years and disciplines.

Exclusion: BIO120H1, ENV200H1, ESS205H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB214H1 - Evolution and Adaptation

Hours: 24L/12T

Evolution and adaptation of life on Earth. Introduction to the theory of evolution by natural selection. Topics may include evidence supporting the fact of evolution, and how evolutionary theory can help explain the world around us, such as how species are formed, and the evolution of sex, infanticide, and disease. For non-science students in all years and disciplines.

Exclusion: BIO120H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB215H1 - Conservation Biology

Hours: 24L/12T

Introduction to the scientific discipline that deals with threatened species and habitats. Topics include biodiversity, extinction, threats, demography, genetic diversity, protecting, managing and restoring ecosystems (e.g., nature reserves, captive breeding, conservation corridors), sustainable development, and global warming. Ties between the study of conservation biology and environmental law, economics, and policy will also be covered. This is a course for non-science students in all years and disciplines.

Exclusion: BIO120H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BIO220H1 - From Genomes to Ecosystems in a Changing World

Hours: 24L/15P

Dynamics of genetic and ecological change in biological systems, from genomes to ecosystems. Evolutionary genetic and ecological perspectives on wide-ranging topics including disease, aging, sexual conflict, genetics of human differences, conservation, and global climate change. Applications of evolutionary, ecological, and molecular-genetic principles and processes. Responsibilities of human societies in a changing world. (Lab Materials Fee: $26).

Prerequisite: BIO120H1
Recommended Preparation: BIO130H1, BIO230H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB225H1 - Biostatistics for Biological Sciences

Hours: 36L/12P

A statistics course designed especially for life science students, using examples from ecology and evolution where appropriate. Students learn to choose and use statistics that are appropriate to address relevant biological questions and hypotheses. Lectures and computer labs will be used to cover the following methods: sampling and experimental design, data exploration, correlation, regression, ANOVA, Chi-square, and other parametric tests.

Prerequisite: BIO120H1
Exclusion: ECO220Y1/ ECO227Y1/ GGR270H1/ HMB325H1/ PCL376H1/ PSY201H1/ SOC300Y1/ STA220H1/ STA250H1/ STA288H1
Distribution Requirements: Science

EEB240H1 - Environmental Biology: From Organisms to Ecosystems

Previous Course Number: ENV234H1

Hours: 24L/15P

Biological processes depend on, and impact, environmental conditions that change across space and time, from local scales to biomes, and from seconds to millennia. This course examines the relationships among organisms, populations, and communities, and ecosystems, including the increasing impacts of human activity on environmental conditions. It draws links between global change, biological diversity, and the functions of ecosystems from local to global scales. We use examples from both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems and emphasize the connectivity across ecosystems and ecosystem-types. Field trips and labs. Mandatory day-long field trip on a weekend (students choose which day; a fee of $17 may be charged for transportation).

Prerequisite: BIO120H1
Exclusion: ENV234H1
Recommended Preparation: JEG100H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BIO251H1 - Form, Function and Development in Plants

Hours: 24L/12T

This course is an introduction to structure, function and ecology of vegetative and reproductive processes in plants with a focus on flowering plants and gymnosperms. Topics of study in lecture and laboratory tutorials include photosynthesis, transport processes, plant reproduction, patterns of plant growth and development, and the role of hormones in plant development.

Prerequisite: BIO120H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB255H1 - Essentials of Biodiversity Science and Conservation Biology

Hours: 24L/24T

“Classical” and “new” concepts in biodiversity and conservation. Topics may include: evolution and ecology in the past (Holocene) and future (Anthropocene); levels and kinds of biodiversity; valuing biodiversity through ecological economics; causes of endangerment; predicting extinction; genetic and demographic theory; habitat protection and captive breeding; conservation policies and endangered species acts; designing future biodiversity.

Prerequisite: BIO120H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB263H1 - Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

Hours: 24L/36P

The ontogeny and phylogeny of vertebrate structure are considered within the context of evolutionary theory. Functional aspects of the various organ systems are examined. Representative vertebrates are analyzed (with brief dissection of some forms) in laboratory to illustrate selected anatomical features and to provide practical exposure to vertebrate construction. (Lab Materials Fee: $26)

Prerequisite: BIO120H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB266H1 - Animal Diversity: Invertebrates

Hours: 24L/18P

The diversity of invertebrates (e.g. sponges, jellyfish, flatworms, molluscs, segmented worms, round worms, arthropods, echinoderms and several smaller phyla) is explored, focusing on taxonomic characters that define each group and their placement in the evolutionary tree of life, ecological function, biological requirements, and geographical distribution. Labs emphasize identification and recognition of major groups, including dissection when appropriate. (Lab Materials Fee: $26)

Prerequisite: BIO120H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB267H1 - Animal Diversity: Vertebrates

Hours: 24L/18P

Introduction to the diversity of chordate animals (vertebrates, tunicates, and lancelets), focusing on morphological, physiological, ecological and behavioural traits that make each group special and how those traits increase vulnerability to human-based exploitation. Labs involve living organisms whenever possible, but only for display purposes.

Prerequisite: BIO120H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB268H1 - Plant and Microbial Diversity

Hours: 24L/36P

Introduction to the biology of algae, fungi, and land plants. Lectures and labs emphasize the diversity of organisms with a focus on life cycles, ecology, and evolution. (Lab Materials Fee: $26)

Prerequisite: BIO120H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB299H1 - Research Opportunity Program

Credit course for supervised participation in faculty research project. Details at https://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/academics/research-opportunities/research-opportunities-program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Science

EEB299Y1 - Research Opportunity Program

Credit course for supervised participation in faculty research project. Details at https://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/academics/research-opportunities/research-opportunities-program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Science

EEB313H1 - Quantitative Methods in R for Biology

Hours: 24L/24P

The quantitative analysis and management of biological data is crucial in modern life sciences disciplines. Students will develop skills with R as applied to problems in ecology and evolutionary biology to learn reproducible approaches for data management, data manipulation, visualization, modelling, statistical analysis, and simulation for solving biological problems.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1, EEB225H1/ STA288H1/ STA220H1
Exclusion: STA130H1, PSY305H1
Recommended Preparation: CSC108H1/ CSC120H1/ CSC121H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

EEB318H1 - Principles of Evolution

Hours: 24L/12T

Principles and practice of evolutionary biology since Darwin. Topics may include: phylogeny, speciation, mutation and neutral evolution, population genetic variation, quantitative genetics, molecular evolution, natural selection and adaptation, evolutionary conflict and cooperation, and levels of selection.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1
Exclusion: EEB323H1/ EEB324H1
Recommended Preparation: BIO260H1/ HMB265H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB319H1 - Population Ecology

Hours: 24L/36P

Abundance and distribution of populations; population growth and regulation; fluctuations, stochasticity and chaos; meta-population persistence and extinction; age and stage-structured populations; interactions within and between species; optimal harvesting; spread of infectious diseases. Labs include experiments and computer simulations. (Lab Materials Fee: $26)

Prerequisite: BIO220H1; ( MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/ MAT137Y1/ MAT157Y1; and a course in statistics from EEB225H1 (recommended)/ PSY201H1/ STA220H1/ STA250H1/ STA257H1/ STA288H1/ GGR270H1/ HMB325H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB320H1 - Dynamics of Ecosystem Processes

Hours: 24L/24P

This course explores the relationships and feedback between biological communities and the abiotic factors of ecosystems. The course will cover the biogeochemical dynamics of energy and nutrients through ecosystem development and the effects of global change on these processes. The lab component of the course will apply lecture concepts and tools to specific case studies. A field trip may be offered and a fee of $17 may be charged for transportation. (Lab Materials Fee: $26)

Prerequisite: BIO220H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB321H1 - Community Ecology

Hours: 24L/36P

Nature and analysis of community structure; disturbance and community development; species interactions; community assembly processes.  Computer exercises in weekly labs provide training in sampling, simulation, and data analysis.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1; and a course in statistics from EEB225H1 (recommended), PSY201H1, STA220H1/ STA250H1/ STA257H1/ STA288H1, GGR270H1, HMB325H1
Recommended Preparation: EEB319H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB322H1 - Behaviour and Behavioural Ecology

Hours: 24L/36P

A broad introduction to animal behaviour emphasizing concepts from ethology and behavioural ecology, including foraging, predation, mating systems, parental care and behaviour genetics. Field and laboratory studies are undertaken. (Lab Materials Fee: $26)

Prerequisite: BIO220H1; and a course in statistics from EEB225H1 (recommended), PSY201H1, STA220H1/ STA250H1/ STA257H1/ STA288H1, GGR270H1, HMB325H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB323H1 - Evolutionary Genetics

Hours: 36L/12T

Evolutionary biology rests on a foundation of evolutionary genetics. This course focuses on the core ideas in population genetics and extends to evolutionary genomics. Students are exposed to the mathematical theory underlying evolutionary genetics and will learn the mathematical foundations underlying these ideas. Topics include the population genetics of mutation, migration, drift, and selection, evolutionary analysis of DNA sequences, genome evolution, and the evolution of sexual reproduction.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1, BIO260H1/ HMB265H1
Recommended Preparation: ( MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/ MAT137Y1/ MAT157Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB324H1 - Evolutionary Ecology

Hours: 36L/12T

Empirical and theoretical approaches to key areas of research including natural selection, sexual selection, and life histories. Other topics may include phenotypic plasticity, speciation, co-evolution, and quantitative genetics.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB325H1 - Evolutionary Medicine

Hours: 36L/12T

How evolutionary principles can help us better understand health and disease. Concepts from evolutionary biology (e.g., life history theory, coevolution, genomic conflict, constraints and trade-offs) will be applied to key problems in medicine and public health, including antibiotic resistance, aging, cancer, autoimmune disease, and pathogen virulence. 

Prerequisite: BIO130H1, BIO220H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB328H1 - Physiological Ecology

Hours: 24L/24T

An advanced treatment of the physiological mechanisms controlling plant and animal distribution and ecological success. Topics of focus include photosynthesis and resource balance, water and nutrient relations, temperature effects, and adaptations to abiotic stress. A fee of approximately $17 may be charged for field trip transportation.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1
Recommended Preparation: BIO251H1/ BIO270H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB340H1 - Comparative Plant Morphology

Hours: 24L/36P

This course addresses the origin of land plants and subsequent diversification of land plant vegetative and reproductive form and function. Lectures and laboratory tutorials synthesize morphological and anatomical knowledge from living organisms and fossil records with cellular, physiological and molecular information of land plants and their ancestors throughout geological time. Topics of study include the evolution of (i) vegetative and reproductive meristems, (ii) stem, leaf and root architecture, (iii) vascular tissue, (iv) the ovule habit, and (v) fertilization. Lab materials fee: $26.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EHJ352H1 - Evolution of the Human Genome

Hours: 24L/12T

Human genome diversity and evolution with a focus on current research. The course integrates applications of human evolutionary genomics to the understanding of human history and adaptation, the causes of disease, and genome structure and function. Topics include: comparative genomics, population genomics of adaptation, association mapping, repetitive/selfish DNA, and gene duplication.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1, BIO260H1/ HMB265H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

JHE353H1 - History of Evolutionary Biology

Hours: 24L/10T

An examination of major ideas about biological evolution from the 18th century to the 1930s and of their impact on scientific and social thought. Topics include the diversity of life and its classification, the adaptation of organisms to their environment, Wallace’s and Darwin’s views on evolution by natural selection, sexual selection, inheritance from Mendel to T.H. Morgan, eugenics, and the implications of evolution for religion, gender roles, and the organization of society. Offered by the Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology.

Prerequisite: 6.0 credits
Exclusion: HPS353H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities, Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

JHE355H1 - History and Philosophy of Evolutionary Biology

Hours: 24L/10T

An examination of the place of the organism in evolutionary theory from the early 1900s to the present. Biology is the science of living things, and yet, paradoxically, living things--organisms--have been comprehensively left out of the Modern Synthesis theory of evolution that developed in the twentieth century. This course surveys the reasons--historical, philosophical and empirical--for the marginalisation of organisms from evolutionary theory. It examines the ways in which evolutionary developmental biology attempts to restore the organisms to a central place in evolutionary biology. Offered by faculty in the Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology.

Prerequisite: 6.0 credits, including two 0.5 credits or a 1.0 credit course in any one or more of EEB, BIO or HPS
Exclusion: HPS333H1/ HPS355H1
Recommended Preparation: JHE353H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities, Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EEB362H1 - Macroevolution

Hours: 24L/24T

Explores patterns and processes of large-scale evolutionary change, played out over large geographic expanses and extended periods of time. Integrates information from paleontology, phylogenetics, field studies, functional biology, and experiments to link emergent evolutionary patterns to underlying evolutionary processes. Topics include: speciation, phylogenetic inference, adaptive vs. non-adaptive evolution, evolutionary constraints, diversification and extinction, evolutionary innovations, historical biogeography, and the relationship between evolutionary history and ecology. Tutorials will illustrate common analytical approaches to macroevolutionary investigation and provide in-depth exploration of landmark studies in macroevolution.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB365H1 - Topics in Applied Conservation Biology

Hours: 24L/24P

Applied conservation biology including management (at the level of species/populations, environments/landscapes, and ecosystems) and how to conserve and maintain biodiversity and ecosystem function (including species and ecosystem distribution modelling).

Prerequisite: BIO220H1, EEB225H1/ ECO220Y1/ ECO227Y1/ GGR270H1/ HMB325H1/ PSY201H1/ SOC300Y1/ STA220H1/ STA250H1/ STA288H1
Recommended Preparation: EEB255H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB380H1 - Diversity of Insects

Hours: 24L/36P

Evolutionary history, morphology, physiology, development, behaviour, and ecological significance of insects. Labs focus on identification of major groups of insects found in Ontario and each student makes an insect collection. Insects are collected during field trips during class time and also on Saturday field trips early in the term. (Lab Materials Fee: $26)

Prerequisite: BIO220H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB382H1 - Diversity of Fishes

Hours: 24L/18P

Systematics, morphology, ecology, behaviour, biogeography, and conservation of fishes. Identification of major groups of fish; what makes each group biologically special and how those unique traits might contribute to conservation concerns. Labs focus on exercises designed to highlight how ichthyologists actually do research. (Lab Materials Fee: $26)

Prerequisite: BIO220H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB384H1 - Diversity of Amphibians and Reptiles

Hours: 24L/36P

Lectures and laboratories examine the natural history, morphology, behaviour, ecology, evolutionary relationships, and biogeography of amphibians (frogs and toads, salamanders, caecilians) and non-avian reptiles (turtles, the tuatara, lizards, snakes, and crocodilians). Ancillary fee of $25 to cover cost of arranging a live animal lab featuring living Ontario reptiles and amphibians. Students are also required to purchase a $25 lab manual.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB386H1 - Diversity of Birds

Hours: 24L/24P

Diversity of Birds provides a general overview of bird biology and diversity, including bird origins and evolution, modern classification and diversity, flight evolution and mechanics, reproduction, ecology, and conservation. Labs focus on anatomy, functional morphology and field techniques that will be put into practice in a final field trip.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1
Exclusion: BIOD48H3/ BIO326H5
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB388H1 - Diversity of Mammals

Hours: 24L/36P

Lectures and laboratories examine the natural history, morphology, classification, evolutionary relationships, reproduction, biogeography, and conservation of mammals. Labs focus on the identification of mammals and their diverse morphological adaptations including mammals of Ontario. Lab manual fee: $25.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB390H1 - Vertebrate Paleontology: Major Transitions in Vertebrate History

Hours: 24L/18P

The evolutionary history of vertebrates is recorded in their fossil record. Lectures highlight the origin and radiation of major vertebrate clades, and emphasize key events in vertebrate history, notably major ecological and evolutionary transitions, and mass extinctions. Practicals (at the Royal Ontario Museum) explore fossils that exemplify these themes.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1; at least one of EEB263H1, EEB267H1, EEB362H1, EEB382H1, EEB384H1, EEB386H1, EEB388H1
Recommended Preparation: EEB263H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB397Y1 - Research Project in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

An intermediate research project requiring the prior consent of a member of the Department to supervise the project. The topic is to be one mutually agreed on by the student and supervisor. They must arrange the time, place, and provision of any materials and submit to the Undergraduate Office a signed form of agreement outlining details prior to being enrolled. This course is open to highly self-motivated students who are in their Third Year and have a strong interest in ecology and/or evolutionary biology. Students are required to write up the results of their research in a formal paper, often in the format of a research article, and may be required to present the results at a poster session and/or participate in an oral presentation. Students should contact their potential supervisors over the summer before classes begin in September. Information regarding how to apply and register for the course is available on the EEB website. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Note: cannot enrol if already taken the fourth year research project course EEB498Y1/ EEB499Y1.

Prerequisite: Completion of 9.0 credits.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB398H0 - Research Excursions

An instructor-supervised project in an off-campus setting. Details at https://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/academics/research-opportunities/research-excursions-program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Science

EEB398Y0 - Research Excursion

An instructor-supervised group project in an off-campus setting. Details at: https://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/academics/research-opportunities/research-excursions-program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

EEB399H1 - Research Opportunity Program

Credit course for supervised participation in faculty research project. Details at https://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/academics/research-opportunities/research-opportunities-program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Science

EEB399Y1 - Research Opportunity Program

Credit course for supervised participation in faculty research project. Details at https://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/academics/research-opportunities/research-opportunities-program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

EEB403H0 - Tropical Field Biology

A two-week field course introducing students to the diversity of biological communities in the tropics focusing on ecological and evolutionary interactions. Plant and animal communities of the New World tropics are compared and contrasted with temperate communities. Student research projects included. Fee for accommodations, food, within course travel, station fee, etc. will apply.

Students interested in taking an EEB field course apply directly to the department. Spaces for the course are limited, and student selection is based on a number of criteria that include:

  1. background in EEB concepts and approaches (assessed through courses taken and grades);
  2. benefit of course to student progress in their program of study and for professional development (assessed through courses taken and the student statement in the application)
  3. interest and motivation for taking the course (assessed through the student statement in the application)
  4. Year of study, with more senior students given preference.

See Departmental website for details. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1 and permission of department
Recommended Preparation: A second or third year ecology, evolution or environmental biology course; and a course in statistics.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB403H1 - Tropical Field Biology

A two-week field course introducing students to the diversity of biological communities in the tropics focusing on ecological and evolutionary interactions. Plant and animal communities of the New World tropics are compared and contrasted with temperate communities. Student research projects included. Fee for accommodations, food, within course travel, station fee, etc., will apply.

Students interested in taking an EEB field course apply directly to the department. Spaces for the course are limited, and student selection is based on a number of criteria that include:

  1. background in EEB concepts and approaches (assessed through courses taken and grades);
  2. benefit of course to student progress in their program of study and for professional development (assessed through courses taken and the student statement in the application)
  3. interest and motivation for taking the course (assessed through the student statement in the application)
  4. Year of study, with more senior students given preference.

See Departmental website for details. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1 and permission of department
Recommended Preparation: A second or third year ecology, evolution or environmental biology course; and a course in statistics.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB405H1 - Temperate Field Biology

A two-week field course offered (in May or August) at U of T’s Koffler Scientific Reserve, King City, Ontario. Students learn the natural history of the region and conduct a field-based research project in ecology or evolutionary biology. A fee of $800 for accommodations, food, within course travel, station fee, etc. will apply.

Students interested in taking an EEB field course apply directly to the department. Spaces for the course are limited, and student selection is based on a number of criteria that include:

  1. background in EEB concepts and approaches (assessed through courses taken and grades);
  2. benefit of course to student progress in their program of study and for professional development (assessed through courses taken and the student statement in the application)
  3. interest and motivation for taking the course (assessed through the student statement in the application)
  4. Year of study, with more senior students given preference.

See Departmental website for details. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1 and a course in statistics and permission of department
Recommended Preparation: A second- or third-year ecology, evolution or environmental biology course.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB405H0 - Temperate Field Biology

A two-week field course offered (in May or August) at U of T’s Koffler Scientific Reserve, King City, Ontario. Students learn the natural history of the region and conduct a field-based research project in ecology or evolutionary biology. A fee of $800 for accommodations, food, within course travel, station fee, etc. will apply.

Students interested in taking an EEB field course apply directly to the department. Spaces for the course are limited, and student selection is based on a number of criteria that include:

  1. background in EEB concepts and approaches (assessed through courses taken and grades);
  2. benefit of course to student progress in their program of study and for professional development (assessed through courses taken and the student statement in the application)
  3. interest and motivation for taking the course (assessed through the student statement in the application)
  4. Year of study, with more senior students given preference.

See Departmental website for details. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1 and a course in statistics and permission of department
Recommended Preparation: A second- or third-year ecology, evolution or environmental biology course.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB406H0 - Inter-University Field Course

A two-week field course offered between May and August by another Ontario university (to various locations) as part of the Ontario Universities Program in Field Biology (OUPFB). The selection of field course modules are announced in January. For registration information and additional fees information consult the EEB website; fees from $350-5000 will be applied for field trip costs. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Varies on module selected.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB406H1 - Inter-University Field Course

A two-week field course offered between May and August by another Ontario university (to various locations) as part of the Ontario Universities Program in Field Biology (OUPFB). The selection of field course modules are announced in January. For registration information and additional fees information consult the EEB website; fees from $350-5000 will be applied for field trip costs. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Varies on module selected
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB410H0 - Lake Ecosystem Dynamics

A two-week field course in August (offered in alternate years) at the Harkness Fisheries Research Laboratory in Algonquin Park, Ontario. Field and laboratory exercises demonstrate how interactions between physical, chemical, and biological parameters are crucial in understanding lake ecosystems. Fundamental and applied issues are discussed. Students collect, analyse, and interpret data, and complete a class project and an individual project. Fee for accommodations, food, within course travel, station fee, etc. will apply.

Students interested in taking an EEB field course apply directly to the department. Spaces for the course are limited, and student selection is based on a number of criteria that include:

  1. background in EEB concepts and approaches (assessed through courses taken and grades);
  2. benefit of course to student progress in their program of study and for professional development (assessed through courses taken and the student statement in the application)
  3. interest and motivation for taking the course (assessed through the student statement in the application)
  4. Year of study, with more senior students given preference.

See Departmental website for details. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1 and permission of department
Recommended Preparation: A second- or third-year ecology, evolution or environmental biology course; and a course in statistics.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB410H1 - Lake Ecosystem Dynamics

A two-week field course in August (offered in alternate years) at the Harkness Fisheries Research Laboratory in Algonquin Park, Ontario. Field and laboratory exercises demonstrate how interactions between physical, chemical, and biological parameters are crucial in understanding lake ecosystems. Fundamental and applied issues are discussed. Students collect, analyse, and interpret data, and complete a class project and an individual project. Fee for accommodations, food, within course travel, station fee, etc. will apply.

Students interested in taking an EEB field course apply directly to the department. Spaces for the course are limited, and student selection is based on a number of criteria that include:

  1. background in EEB concepts and approaches (assessed through courses taken and grades);
  2. benefit of course to student progress in their program of study and for professional development (assessed through courses taken and the student statement in the application)
  3. interest and motivation for taking the course (assessed through the student statement in the application)
  4. Year of study, with more senior students given preference.

See Departmental website for details. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1 and permission of department
Recommended Preparation: A second- or third-year ecology, evolution or environmental biology course; and a course in statistics.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB428H1 - Global Change Ecology

Hours: 24L/24T

An examination of organism, population, and ecosystem responses to long-term environmental change occurring at the global scale, with emphasis on human caused perturbation to climate and the carbon, nitrogen, and hydrolic cycles and their ecological effects.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1 and at least 1.0 credit from EEB at the 300+ level
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB430H1 - Modeling in Ecology and Evolution

Hours: 24L/12P

Mathematics is central to science because it provides a rigorous way to go from a set of assumptions to their logical consequences. In ecology & evolution this might be how we think a virus will spread and evolve, how climate change will impact a threatened population, or how much genetic diversity we expect to see in a randomly mating population. In this course you'll learn how to build, analyze, and interpret mathematical models of increasing complexity through readings, lectures, tutorials, assignments, computer labs, and a final project. The focus is on deterministic dynamical models (recursions and differential equations) but we also touch on probability theory and stochastic simulations.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1, MAT136H1/ MAT137Y1/ MAT223H1, and at least one of EEB318H1/ EEB319H1/ EEB321H1/ EEB323H1/ EEB324H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

ENV432H1 - Urban Ecology

Hours: 24L/12S

The ecology of urban areas through consideration of the biological and physical environments, in particular how the human-constructed environment alters pre-existing biophysical conditions and interactions. Encompasses a comparative perspective to study the development of these emerging ecosystems of increasing importance given global urbanization. One or two Saturday field trips (a fee of approximately $17 may be charged for field trip transportation.)

Prerequisite: BIO220H1 and at least one of EEB319H1/ EEB321H1/ EEB365H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB433H1 - Global Issues in Aquatic Ecosystems

Hours: 36L

Advanced study of ecological principles and applied issues in freshwater and marine systems. Lectures and student-led discussions will cover physical, chemical, and biological interactions, from microbes to marine mammals. Topics may include carbon and nutrient cycling, food webs & trophic downgrading, ocean acidification, hydrothermal vents & connectivity in the oceans, lake management.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1, EEB240H1 and one of EEB319H1/ EEB321H1/ EEB328H1/ ENV334H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB434H1 - Marine Ecology

Hours: 24L/18P

This course explores the study of ecological processes in marine and coastal habitats. The course will cover processes operating from individuals to populations and communities to ecosystems, and spanning daily to decadal scales, and meters to global scales. The lab component of the course will apply lecture concepts and tools to specific case studies, which include hands-on activities/experiments and/or data synthesis and analysis. A field trip may be offered and a fee of approximately $17 may be charged for transportation. (Lab materials Fee: $26)

Prerequisite: BIO220H1/ ( BIO120H1, ESS362H1)
Recommended Preparation: EEB225H1, EEB240H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB440H1 - Ecology and Evolution of Plant-Animal Interactions

Hours: 24L/24T

Major concepts in ecology and evolution from the perspective of plant-animal interactions. The richness of interactions between plants and animals is explored including antagonistic interactions (e.g., herbivory), mutualistic interactions (e.g., pollination, seed dispersal, ant-plant associations), and interactions involving multiple species across trophic levels.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1, a course in statistics (from EEB225H1 (recommended)/ PSY201H1/ STA220H1/ STA257H1/ STA288H1/ GGR270H1/ HMB325H1) and at least one of EEB318H1/ EEB319H1/ EEB321H1/ EEB323H1/ EEB324H1/ EEB328H1/ EEB403H1/ EEB403H0/ EEB405H1/ EEB405H0/ EEB406H1/ EEB406H0/ EEB410H1/ EEB410H0
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB441H1 - Reproductive Strategies

Hours: 24L/24T

Behaviour, ecology, genetics and life history theory in the study of the evolution of sex, mate choice, sexual competition, sex ratio, hermaphroditism, age at maturity, fecundity, parental care and alternative strategies. Examples may be drawn from nonhuman animals, plants or fungi and highlight the research focus of the instructor.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB455H1 - Genes, Environment and Behaviour

Hours: 18L/18S

An examination of the Gene-Environment Interplay perspective as sources of individual differences in behaviour, from both mechanistic and evolutionary viewpoints. Both historical and recent studies are used to illustrate important concepts in the field. Student-led discussions address the evidence base for these concepts.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1, HMB265H1/ BIO260H1, and at least 12.0 credits (including 1.0 EEB credit at the 300+ level)
Recommended Preparation: EEB322H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB458H1 - Evolutionary Quantitative Genetics

Hours: 24L/12P

This course will cover quantitative genetic theory for inheritance and evolution of continuous traits over contemporary timescales. Students will learn how to estimate statistical quantities such as genetic variances and heritability using classical pedigree analysis and more recent genomic methods. In the lab component students will learn how to analyze quantitative genetic data sets using modern statistical software and methods.

Prerequisite: EEB225H1 (recommended)/ STA221H1/ STA238H1/ STA248H1/ STA255H1/ STA261H1/ STA288H1; EEB323H1
Recommended Preparation: MAT223H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB459H1 - Population Genetics

Hours: 24L/12T

A focus on theoretical population genetics, using mathematical models to understand how different evolutionary forces drive allele frequency change. Students learn how to mathematically derive classic results in population genetics. Topics include drift, coalescence, the relationship between population and quantitative genetics, selection in finite populations, and mutation load. Offered in alternate years.

Prerequisite: BIO260H1/ HMB265H1, EEB323H1
Recommended Preparation: A solid understanding of basic algebra and calculus.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB460H1 - Molecular Evolution and Genomics

Hours: 36L

Processes of evolution at the molecular level, and the analysis of molecular data. Gene structure, neutrality, nucleotide sequence evolution, sequence evolution, sequence alignment, phylogeny construction, gene families, transposition.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1, BIO230H1/ BIO255H1, BIO260H1/ HMB265H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB462H1 - Phylogenetic Inference: Methods and Applications

Hours: 24L/24P

The representation of the evolutionary relationships in the form of phylogenetic trees has become a fundamental tool in many branches of biology. This course is an introduction to the core concepts and methods of phylogenetic reconstruction including parsimony, likelihood, and Bayesian techniques, as well as advanced topics such as divergence time estimation, species-tree inference, and species delimitation. Through a combination of lectures, discussions, and computer labs, students will master the theory and practice of phylogenetics.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1, EEB225H1/ STA220H1/ STA247H1/ STA248H1/ STA261H1/ STA288H1/ GGR270H1/ PSY201H1
Exclusion: BIO443H5
Recommended Preparation: CSC108H1, EEB125H1, EEB323H1, EEB362H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

EEB463H1 - Computing Stochastic Models in Evolutionary Biology

Hours: 36L

Probability and stochasticity underlie our understanding of evolutionary and ecological processes, but many students don’t get to experience these concepts without a background in mathematics or computer science. This course explores the fundamentals of modelling and quantitative approaches in ecology, evolution, and organismal biology in an accessible way. We will cover the probabilistic foundations of ecological, evolutionary, and bioinformatic models and concepts by developing students’ proficiency at developing their own code from scratch. Students are expected to bring laptops to class or contact the instructor to arrange a laptop loan during classes.

Prerequisite: EEB318H1/ EEB323H1/ EEB324H1/ EEB362H1; EEB125H1/ EEB225H1/ EEB313H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB465H1 - Advanced Topics in Biodiversity Science and Conservation Biology

Hours: 36L

Biodiversity in the Anthropocene. This course links the biological and social sciences to identify human goals for future biodiversity, methods to achieve this biodiversity, and to understand key issues such as the end of the wild, ecosystem services as a unit of conservation, animal welfare as a moral responsibility, and GMOs as biodiversity. Practical training may be provided in identifying species at risk, and in applying ecological-economics to trade-off decisions.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1, EEB255H1 and at least 1.0 credit from EEB at the 300+ level
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB466H1 - Approaches to the Study of Biodiversity

Hours: 24L/24P

This course uses the collections, research, and public gallery areas of the Royal Ontario Museum to expose students to the ways in which biodiversity is discovered, analyzed, and interpreted in a museum setting. Topics include: morphological and molecular approaches, taxonomy, classification, bioinformatics and e-taxonomy, and the interpretation of biodiversity for the public. Labs include student projects and a one-day field trip on a weekend (cost about $17).

Prerequisite: BIO220H1; EEB266H1/ EEB267H1/ EEB268H1/ EEB331H1/ EEB365H1/ EEB380H1/ EEB382H1/ EEB384H1/ EEB386H1/ EEB388H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB488H1 - Research Issues in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Hours: 42S

This course is taken concurrently by students who are enrolled in EEB498Y1 Advanced Research Project in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and uses a combination of seminars, discussions, and presentations (including presentations by students) designed to cover issues commonly encountered when conducting research in ecology and evolutionary biology. Topics may include experimental design, effective use of statistics, scientific writing and publishing, public communication, ethics, and career development. Students will be required to attend weekly departmental seminars. This half-credit course runs from September to April and lectures meet in alternate weeks. Information regarding how to apply and enrol in the course is available on the EEB departmental website.

Prerequisite: Completion of 14.0 credits.
Corequisite: EEB498Y1
Exclusion: EEB499Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB491H1 - Seminar in Biodiversity and Conservation Biology

Hours: 24L

Seminar course in biodiversity and conservation biology, emphasizing critical thinking and the synthesis of ideas crossing disciplinary boundaries. Group discussions among peers, facilitated by faculty, and student presentations. Discussions include critical analysis of research and review articles in the primary literature, with a focus on recent developments in biodiversity science and conservation biology. Evaluation based on presentations, participation in class discussions, and written assignments. (Note: students may take this course only once)

Prerequisite: A minimum of 1.0 credit in EEB courses at the 300+ level
Exclusion: EEB495H1
Recommended Preparation: EEB365H1 highly recommended
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB495H1 - Seminar in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Hours: 24S

Seminar course in ecology and evolutionary biology, emphasizing critical thinking and the synthesis of ideas crossing disciplinary boundaries. Group discussions among peers, facilitated by faculty, and student presentations. Discussions include critical analysis of research and review articles in the primary literature. Evaluation based on presentations, participation in class discussions, and written assignments. (Note students may take this course only once.)

Prerequisite: A minimum of 1.0 credit in EEB courses at the 300+ level
Exclusion: EEB491H1
Recommended Preparation: At least one 0.5 credit in ecology and one 0.5 credit in evolutionary biology is highly recommended.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB497H1 - Research Studies in Ecology & Evolutionary Biology

An independent studies half-credit course allowing students to produce a literature review, which is supervised by a faculty member in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. Highly motivated fourth-year students will work closely with a supervisor and be required to write up the results of their research in a final research paper. Students should contact a potential supervisor well before classes begin in the fall, winter, or summer session. Students cannot take more than two independent research courses of EEB 497H1, 498Y1, and 499Y1, and the second project must be with a different supervisor. Information on how to apply for the course is available on the EEB website. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Completion of 14.0 credits.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB498Y1 - Advanced Research Project in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

An advanced research project (a literature review alone is not sufficient) requiring the prior consent of a member of the Department to supervise the project. The topic is to be one mutually agreed on by the student and supervisor. They must arrange the time, place, and provision of any materials and submit to the Undergraduate Office a signed form of agreement outlining details prior to being enrolled. This course is open only to highly self-motivated students who are in their Fourth-Year and have adequate background in ecology and/or evolutionary biology. Students are required to write up the results of their research in a formal paper, often in the format of a research article, and are also required to present the results at a poster session and/or oral presentation. The time commitment is approximately 8 hours per week. Students should contact their potential supervisors over the summer before classes begin in September. Information regarding how to apply and register for the course is available on the EEB website. Students in this course are also concurrently enrolled in EEB488H1Y Research Issues in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Completion of 14.0 credits.
Corequisite: EEB488H1Y
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB499Y1 - Advanced Research Project in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology II

An advanced research project (a literature review alone is not sufficient) that allows students to do another independent project, supervision of which must be different from EEB497H1/ EEB498Y1. It requires the prior consent of a member of the Department to supervise the project. The topic is to be one mutually agreed on by the student and supervisor. They must arrange the time, place, and provision of any materials and submit to the Undergraduate Office a signed form of agreement outlining details prior to being enrolled. This course is open only to highly self-motivated students who are in their Fourth Year and have adequate background in ecology and/or evolutionary biology. Students are required to write up the results of their research in a formal paper, often in the format of a research article, and are also required to present the results at a poster session and/or oral presentation. The time commitment is approximately 8 hours per week. Students should contact their potential supervisors over the summer before classes begin in September. Information regarding how to apply and register for the course is available on the EEB website. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: EEB497H1/ EEB498Y1 and must have completed 14.0 credits.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

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