Cell and Systems Biology


Faculty List

Professors Emeriti 
D.G. Butler, MSc, PhD, D Sc, FRSA (ZOO) 
J.R. Coleman, BSc, PhD (U)
S.S. Desser, MSc, PhD (ZOO) 
D. Godt, Dipl in Bio, PhD  
M.C. Heath, BSc, PhD, FRSC (BOT) 
J.A. Hellebust, MA, PhD (BOT) 
V.J. Higgins, MS, PhD (BOT) 
E.W. Larsen, MSc, PhD 
R.A. Liversage, AM, PhD (ZOO)
D.A. Lovejoy, BSc, PhD 
Y. Masui, MSc, PhD, FRSC (ZOO) 
P.A. Romans, MSc, PhD 
J.J.B. Smith, MA, PhD (N) 
I. Tallan, BSc, PhD (ZOO) 
S.L. Varmuza, MS, PhD
J.P. Williams, BSc, PhD (BOT)
R. Winklbauer, Dipl in Bio, PhD 
A.M. Zimmerman, MS, PhD (ZOO) 

Associate Professor Emeritus
R. Stephenson, BSc, PhD

Professor and Chair of the Department
N.J. Provart, MSc, PhD

Professors and Associate Chairs
D. Christendat, BSc, PhD
D. Desveaux, MSc, PhD
J.A. Mitchell, BSc, PhD

Professors
M.G. AbouHaidar, MSc, PhD
T. Berleth, Diplom, PhD
A. Bruce, BA, PhD
L.T. Buck, BSc, PhD
B. Chang, AB, PhD
D.R. Goring, MSc, PhD
D.S. Guttman, BSc, PhD
T.J. Harris, BSc, PhD
P. McCourt, MSc, PhD
A.M. Moses, BA, PhD
E. Nambara, MSc, PhD
J. Peever, MSc, PhD
U. Tepass, MSc, PhD, FRSC
V. Tropepe, BSc, PhD
M.A. Woodin, MSc, PhD
K. Yoshioka, MSc, PhD

Associate Professor
S.V. Plotnikov, MSc, PhD 
M.J. Ringuette, BSc, PhD

Assistant Professors
J.A. Calarco, BSc, PhD
Q. Lin, BSc, PhD
S. Lumba, BSc, PhD
H.E. McFarlane, MSc, PhD
A.L. Saltzman, BSc, PhD
M. Shafer, HBSc, MSc, PhD

Professor, Teaching Stream
M. Neumann, MSc, PhD

Associate Professors, Teaching Stream
C. Garside, MSc, PhD

Assistant Professors, Teaching Stream
J. Fraigne, MSc, PhD
J.C. Pressey, BSc, PhD
R. Sarpal, MSc, PhD
K. Yip, BSc, PhD

Introduction

The study of life, biology, has been transformed in recent decades by powerful new ways of asking fundamental questions about how living organisms work. In particular, molecular and microscopy approaches are revealing the incredible complexity of cells. With additional principles drawn from chemistry, physics and information science, we are beginning to understand this complexity and how it transcends multiple scales to organize molecular networks and cellular systems into fully functional organisms.

The Department of Cell and Systems Biology brings together biologists who study life at the level of molecules to functioning individual organisms. Our research laboratories conduct cutting edge research of fundamental processes using a diverse range of model systems (bacteria, yeast, plants, nematodes, insects, fish, frogs, mice, mammalian cell culture and others). Our undergraduate programs reflect this diversity and research strength. Since cells are the basic units of life, it is important to understand how molecular mechanisms control cells and how cells organize the development and physiology of whole organisms. These relationships encompass molecular biology, cell biology, developmental biology, genetics and physiology. These relationships are also complex, requiring studies of dynamic molecular and cellular networks: systems biology. One core component of systems biology is the integration of large datasets arising from the genomics revolution. In addition, computer modeling and bioinformatics are integrated with biochemical, structural, molecular and microscopy studies to understand genomes, transcriptomes, proteomes and metabolomes of the cell and organism.

The Department of Cell and Systems Biology offers two core programs: Animal Physiology (Major) and Cell & Molecular Biology (Major and Specialist). Cell & Molecular Biology Major and Specialist students also have the option of pursuing one Disciplinary Focus in either Molecular Networks of the Cell, Plant Genomics and Biotechnology, or Stem Cells and Developmental Biology.

We also contribute to multi-department programs (Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Biology, and Genome Biology). We administer Bioinformatics & Computational Biology (Specialist) and Genome Biology (Major).

Student Counselling and Enquiries:

Visit the departmental website: https://csb.utoronto.ca/undergraduate-studies/ or contact the Undergraduate Office, Room 533 in the Ramsay Wright Laboratories (416-978-3477; undergrad.csb@utoronto.ca).

Cell and Systems Biology Programs

Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Specialist (Science Program) - ASSPE1868

The genomic and post-genomic era brings opportunities for new insight into all aspects of biology and medicine, based on the computational analysis of very large datasets in a biological context. The Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Program is an interdepartmental, interdisciplinary Program of Study that balances computer-science and life-science courses towards that goal. As a Specialist Program it is designed to prepare students for graduate studies in the field.

The Program is formally administered by the Department of Cell and Systems Biology and co-sponsored by the Departments of Biochemistry, Computer Science, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and Molecular Genetics; all sponsoring Departments have clear trajectories to extend the Program into graduate studies in the respective Department.

Note: this program has deregulated fees, which are incurred after enrolment in the program. Please refer to Arts & Science Registration Instructions for more information.


Enrolment Requirements:

This is a limited enrolment program. Students must have completed 4.0 credits and meet the requirements listed below to enrol.

Variable Minimum Grade Average
A minimum grade average is needed for entry, and this minimum changes each year depending on available spaces and the number of applicants. The following courses must be completed:

To ensure that students admitted to the program will be successful, applicants with a grade average lower than 75% in these required courses will not be considered for admission. Please note that obtaining this minimum grade average does not guarantee admission to the program. While it is difficult to predict what will constitute a "competitive" grade average in a given year, based on previous years the estimate is =mid 80s.

Applications from students lacking a numerical grade in one of the specified prerequisites may be considered on the basis of their entire academic record and the availability of space in the program.

Students in this program have the option to request enrolment in the Arts & Science Internship Program (ASIP) stream. Students can apply for the ASIP stream after Year 1 (Year 2 entry) or after Year 2 (Year 3 entry, starting Fall 2024). Full details about ASIP, including student eligibility, selection and enrolment, are available in the ASIP section of the Arts & Science Academic Calendar. Please note that the majority of students enter ASIP in Fall term of Year 2. Space is more limited for Year 3 entry. Students applying for Year 3 entry must have been admitted to the Bioinformatics & Computational Biology Specialist in the Summer after Year 2.

Completion Requirements:

Specialist program:
(12.5 credits)

First or second year:
Foundational courses (5.0 credits total)
( MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1
( CSC108H1, CSC148H1)/ CSC110Y1
( CSC111H1/​ CSC165H1, CSC236H1)/ CSC240H1 (1)
CSC263H1/​ CSC265H1
( CHM135H1, CHM136H1)/ CHM151Y1
BIO130H1

Upper years:
Program requirements (7.5 credits total)
STA237H1/​ STA247H1/​ STA255H1/​ STA257H1
CSC207H1
CSC209H1
CSC373H1
BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1
BIO260H1/​ HMB265H1
( BCH210H1, ( BCH311H1/​ CSB349H1/​ MGY311Y1))/ BCH242Y1
BCH441H1/​ MGY441H1/​ CSB472H1
BCB330Y1
BCB410H1
BCB420H1
BCB430Y1

Students in this program have the option to complete the Arts & Science Internship Program (ASIP) stream

Notes:

BCB students are allowed to enrol in up to 2.5 CSC credits at the 300/400-level

Course substitutions are possible with written permission of the Program Director. Note that the requirements for a co-sponsoring Department’s major can normally be fulfilled with 0.5 to 3.5 additional credits. All Major programs in the co-sponsoring life science departments require BIO120H1, however, it is not formally a part of this Specialist Program's requirements.

(1) The "missing" 0.5 credit of the substitution does not have to be replaced. For details, please refer to the Computer Science Program instructions in this Calendar.

Former BCB students benefitted from taking CSB352H1, Bioinformatic Methods. They also found it to be helpful to take BCH441H1/​ MGY441H1 prior to BCB410H1 due to BCB410H1's R programming requirement.

Cell & Molecular Biology Specialist (Science Program) - ASSPE1003

Students learn how genes and proteins organize cells for cellular activities, multicellular development, and cellular interactions with the environment. Students also learn how cell and molecular biology research is conducted, and receive training in advanced techniques of the field. Cell and molecular biology research is one the most demanding fields in science. Students gain an understanding of the field, and leave the program equipped to tackle fundamental scientific questions.

After foundational courses in first and second year, students participate in advanced lecture, seminar and laboratory courses, and are encouraged to apply for research project courses in the laboratories of the Department. Course offerings include gene expression, cell biology, developmental biology, plant development, plant-microbe interactions, plant signaling, neurogenesis, tissue morphogenesis, stem cell biology, genomics and proteomics.

Enrolment Requirements:

This is a limited enrolment program. Students must have completed 4.0 credits and meet the requirements listed below to enrol.

Completed courses
The following courses are required:

Variable Minimum Grade
A minimum grade in some courses is needed for entry, and this minimum changes each year depending on available spaces and the number of applicants. The following courses must be completed:

To ensure that students admitted to the program will be prepared, applicants with a final grade lower than 70% in BIO130H1 or BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1 will not be considered for admission. Please note that obtaining this minimum final grade or minimum grade average does not guarantee admission to the program.

Students in this program have the option to request enrolment in the Arts & Science Internship Program (ASIP) stream. Students can apply for the ASIP stream after Year 1 (Year 2 entry) or after Year 2 (Year 3 entry, starting Fall 2024). Full details about ASIP, including student eligibility, selection and enrolment, are available in the ASIP section of the Arts & Science Academic Calendar. Please note that the majority of students enter ASIP in Fall term of Year 2. Space is more limited for Year 3 entry. Students applying for Year 3 entry must have been admitted to the Cell & Molecular Biology Specialist in the Summer after Year 2.

Completion Requirements:

(12.5 credits, including at least 1.0 credit at the 400-level)

First Year:
BIO120H1, BIO130H1; ( CHM135H1, CHM136H1)/ CHM151Y1; JMB170Y1/​ ( MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1.

Higher Years:
1. ( PHY131H1, PHY132H1)/ ( PHY151H1, PHY152H1)
2. BIO220H1, BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1, BIO270H1, BIO271H1, BIO260H1/​ HMB265H1; BCH210H1
3. CSB330H1/​ CSB350H1/​ CSB352H1, CSB349H1
4. 1.0 credit from: CJH332H1, CSB327H1, CSB328H1, CSB329H1, CSB331H1, CSB340H1, CSB353H1
5. 1.0 credit from: BCH422H1, BCH426H1, BCH444H1, BCH445H1, CSB427H1, CSB428H1, CSB429H1, CSB430H1, CSB431H1, CSB435H1, CSB450H1, CSB451H1, CSB452H1, CSB454H1, CSB457H1, CSB458H1, CSB459H1, CSB460H1, CSB471H1, CSB472H1, CSB473H1, CSB474H1, CSB475H1, CSB483H1
6. 2.5 credits from: BCH422H1, BCH426H1, BCH440H1, BCH444H1, BCH445H1, CJH332H1, CSB299Y1, CSB327H1, CSB328H1, CSB329H1, CSB330H1, CSB331H1, CSB340H1, CSB350H1, CSB351Y1, CSB352H1, CSB353H1, CSB360H1, CSB397Y0, CSB399Y1, CSB427H1, CSB428H1, CSB429H1, CSB430H1, CSB431H1, CSB435H1, CSB447H1, CSB450H1, CSB451H1, CSB452H1, CSB453H1, CSB454H1, CSB457H1, CSB458H1, CSB459H1, CSB460H1, CSB471H1, CSB472H1, CSB473H1, CSB474H1, CSB475H1, CSB483H1, CSB490H1, CSB491H1, CSB492H1, CSB497H1, CSB498Y1, CSB499Y1, HMB496Y1/​ HMB499Y1, MGY441H1, MGY480Y1.

NOTE: No more than 0.5 credit in BCH can be used towards requirements 5. and 6.

The Cell & Molecular Biology Specialist Program has the additional option of a Disciplinary Focus.

Students in this program have the option to complete the Arts & Science Internship Program (ASIP) stream.

Cell & Molecular Biology Specialist: Focus in Molecular Networks of the Cell - ASSPE1003A

Starting in 2nd year, this focus organizes a restricted number of highly motivated Cell and Molecular Biology Specialist students with an interest in Molecular Networks of the Cell. Focus students are required to complete a subset of related program courses and to participate in a learning community for the focus.

Enrolment Requirements:

Once you have been approved for and have enrolled in the Cell and Molecular Biology Specialist program, you have the option to apply for entry into a focus. The focuses have a limited enrolment and can only accommodate a restricted number of students with a particular interest in the topic of the focus. Students can only apply for one focus. Admission will be determined with a minimum grade of 80% in BIO130H1. If the student does not achieve 80% in BIO130H1, admission can be determined with a minimum grade of 80% in BIO230H1, BIO255H1 or CSB349H1. On the application form, students must include a 300-word statement of interest regarding the topic of the focus. Statement submission instructions are in the Undergraduate program section of the CSB website, http://csb.utoronto.ca. Achieving these requirements does not necessarily guarantee admission to the focus in any given year.

Students in a focus complete the requirements of First Year, the requirements 1.-3. of Higher Years, as well as requirements 4.-7 specific to each focus.

Each year students are enrolled in a focus, they must also be an active participant in the faculty-led learning community for their focus (requirement 7.). The learning community appears as a non-credit course recognized on the co-curricular record. Students who fail to contribute to the faculty-led learning community will be removed from the focus.

Completion Requirements:

This Focus is part of the Cell and Molecular Biology Specialist and begins with the requirements of First Year and of lines 1-3 of Higher Years of the Cell and Molecular Biology Specialist Program.

4. 1.0 credit from: CJH332H1, CSB327H1, CSB331H1, CSB353H1
5. 1.0 credit from: CSB427H1, CSB428H1, CSB429H1, CSB435H1, CSB451H1, CSB454H1, CSB457H1, CSB458H1, CSB459H1, CSB460H1, CSB475H1
6. 2.5 credits from: BCH422H1, BCH426H1, BCH440H1, BCH444H1, BCH445H1, CJH332H1, CSB299Y1, CSB327H1, CSB328H1, CSB329H1, CSB330H1, CSB331H1, CSB340H1, CSB350H1, CSB351Y1, CSB352H1, CSB353H1, CSB397Y0, CSB399Y1, CSB427H1, CSB428H1, CSB429H1, CSB430H1, CSB431H1, CSB435H1, CSB447H1, CSB450H1, CSB451H1, CSB452H1, CSB454H1, CSB457H1, CSB458H1, CSB459H1, CSB460H1, CSB472H1, CSB473H1, CSB474H1, CSB475H1, CSB483H1, CSB490H1, CSB491H1, CSB492H1, CSB497H1, CSB498Y1, CSB499Y1, MGY441H1. No more than 0.5 credit in BCH can be used towards this requirement.
7. Molecular Network Learning Community (each year of focus enrolment)

Cell & Molecular Biology Specialist: Focus in Plant Genomics and Biotechnology - ASSPE1003B

Starting in 2nd year, this focus organizes a restricted number of highly motivated Cell and Molecular Biology Specialist students with an interest in Plant Genomics and Biotechnology. Focus students are required to complete a subset of related program courses and to participate in a learning community for the focus.

Enrolment Requirements:

Once you have been approved for and have enrolled in the Cell and Molecular Biology Specialist program, you have the option to apply for entry into a focus. The focuses have a limited enrolment and can only accommodate a restricted number of students with a particular interest in the topic of the focus. Students can only apply for one focus. Admission will be determined with a minimum grade of 80% in BIO130H1. If the student does not achieve 80% in BIO130H1, admission can be determined with a minimum grade of 80% in BIO230H1, BIO255H1 or CSB349H1. On the application form, students must include a 300-word statement of interest regarding the topic of the focus. Statement submission instructions are in the Undergraduate program section of the CSB website, http://csb.utoronto.ca. Achieving these requirements does not necessarily guarantee admission to the focus in any given year.

Students in a focus complete the requirements of First Year, the requirements 1.-3. of Higher Years, as well as requirements 4.-7 specific to each focus.

Each year students are enrolled in a focus, they must also be an active participant in the faculty-led learning community for their focus (requirement 7.). The learning community appears as a non-credit course recognized on the co-curricular record. Students who fail to contribute to the faculty-led learning community will be removed from the focus.

Completion Requirements:

This Focus is part of the Cell and Molecular Biology Specialist and begins with the requirements of First Year and of lines 1-3 of Higher Years of the Cell and Molecular Biology Specialist Program.

4. 1.0 credit from: CSB340H1, CSB350H1/​ CSB352H1, CSB353H1
5. 1.0 credit from: CSB435H1, CSB450H1, CSB451H1, CSB452H1, CSB454H1, CSB459H1, CSB460H1, CSB471H1, CSB472H1, CSB473H1, CSB474H1, CSB475H1
6. 2.5 credits from: BCH422H1, BCH426H1, BCH440H1, BCH444H1, BCH445H1, CSB299Y1, CSB328H1, CSB329H1, CSB330H1, CSB331H1, CSB340H1, CSB350H1, CSB351Y1, CSB352H1, CSB353H1, CSB397Y0, CSB399Y1, CSB428H1, CSB431H1, CSB435H1, CSB450H1, CSB451H1, CSB452H1, CSB454H1, CSB458H1, CSB459H1, CSB460H1, CSB471H1, CSB472H1, CSB473H1, CSB474H1, CSB475H1, CSB483H1, CSB490H1, CSB491H1, CSB492H1, CSB497H1, CSB498Y1, CSB499Y1, MGY441H1. No more than 0.5 credit in BCH can be used towards this requirement.
7. Plant Biotech Learning Community (each year of focus enrolment)

Cell & Molecular Biology Specialist: Focus in Stem Cells and Developmental Biology - ASSPE1003C

Starting in 2nd year, this focus organizes a restricted number of highly motivated Cell and Molecular Biology Specialist students with an interest in Stem Cells and Developmental Biology. Focus students are required to complete a subset of related program courses and to participate in a learning community for the focus.

Enrolment Requirements:

Once you have been approved for and have enrolled in the Cell and Molecular Biology Specialist program, you have the option to apply for entry into a focus. The focuses have a limited enrolment and can only accommodate a restricted number of students with a particular interest in the topic of the focus. Students can only apply for one focus. Admission will be determined with a minimum grade of 80% in BIO130H1. If the student does not achieve 80% in BIO130H1, admission can be determined with a minimum grade of 80% in BIO230H1, BIO255H1 or CSB349H1. On the application form, students must include a 300-word statement of interest regarding the topic of the focus. Statement submission instructions are in the Undergraduate program section of the CSB website, http://csb.utoronto.ca. Achieving these requirements does not necessarily guarantee admission to the focus in any given year.

Students in a focus complete the requirements of First Year, the requirements 1-3 of Higher Years, as well as requirements 4-7 specific to each focus.

Each year students are enrolled in a focus, they must also be an active participant in the faculty-led learning community for their focus (requirement 7). The learning community appears as a non-credit course recognized on the co-curricular record. Students who fail to contribute to the faculty-led learning community will be removed from the focus.

Completion Requirements:

This Focus is part of the Cell and Molecular Biology Specialist and begins with the requirements of First Year and of lines 1-3 of Higher Years of the Cell and Molecular Biology Specialist Program.

4. 1.0 credit from: CSB328H1, CSB329H1, CSB340H1
5. 1.0 credit from: CSB427H1, CSB429H1, CSB430H1, CSB431H1, CSB483H1
6. 2.5 credits from: BCH422H1, BCH426H1, BCH440H1, BCH441H1, BCH444H1, BCH445H1, CSB299Y1, CSB327H1, CSB328H1, CSB329H1, CSB330H1, CSB331H1, CSB340H1, CSB350H1, CSB352H1, CSB397Y0, CSB399Y1, CSB427H1, CSB428H1, CSB429H1, CSB430H1, CSB431H1, CSB435H1, CSB450H1, CSB453H1, CSB458H1, CSB460H1, CSB472H1, CSB473H1, CSB474H1, CSB483H1, CSB490H1, CSB491H1, CSB492H1, CSB497H1, CSB498Y1, CSB499Y1. No more than one 0.5 credit in BCH can be used towards this requirement.
7. Multicellularity Learning Community (each year of focus enrolment)

Animal Physiology Major (Science Program) - ASMAJ1538

Students learn to compare and contrast the physiological systems of different animal species, or of a single species under difference environmental conditions. This experimental science strives to understand how physiological systems allow animals to adapt to their individual and ever-changing environments. Through a systems-level approach, from molecules to organisms, students gain an understanding of how emergent properties arise when physiological components operate as a whole.

After foundational courses in first and second year, students participate in advanced lecture, seminar and laboratory courses, and are encouraged to apply for research project courses in the laboratories of the Department. Course offerings include neurophysiology, respiratory physiology, endocrinology, sleep physiology and comparative cellular physiology.

Enrolment Requirements:

This is an open enrolment program. A student who has completed 4.0 credits may enrol in the program.

Students in this program have the option to request enrolment in the Arts & Science Internship Program (ASIP) stream. Students can apply for the ASIP stream after Year 1 (Year 2 entry) or after Year 2 (Year 3 entry, starting Fall 2024). Full details about ASIP, including student eligibility, selection and enrolment, are available in the ASIP section of the Arts & Science Academic Calendar. Please note that the majority of students enter ASIP in Fall term of Year 2. Space is more limited for Year 3 entry. Students applying for Year 3 entry must have been admitted to the Animal Physiology Major in the Summer after Year 2.

Completion Requirements:

(8.0 credits)

First Year:

1. BIO120H1, BIO130H1; ( CHM135H1, CHM136H1)/ CHM151Y1
2. 1.0 credit from JMB170Y1/​ MAT135H1/​ MAT136H1/​ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1/​ PHY131H1/​ PHY132H1/​ PHY151H1/​ PHY152H1

Higher Years:

1. BIO220H1, BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1
2. BIO270H1, BIO271H1
3. CSB325H1
4. 0.5 credit from: CJH332H1, CSB343H1, CSB346H1
5. 1.5 credits (at least 0.5 credit must be at the 300+ level) from: BCH210H1; BIO260H1/​ HMB265H1; CJH332H1; CSB299Y1, CSB327H1, CSB328H1, CSB329H1, CSB330H1, CSB331H1, CSB343H1, CSB346H1, CSB348H1, CSB352H1, CSB397Y0; CSB399Y1; EEB263H1; PSY397H1; STA220H1
6. 0.5 credit at the 400-level from CSB426H1, CSB427H1, CSB430H1, CSB431H1, CSB432H1, CSB445H1, CSB447H1, CSB483H1, CSB492H1, CSB497H1, CSB498Y1, CSB499Y1; HMB430H1, HMB472H1, HMB496Y1, HMB499Y1; PSL432H1, PSL452H1

Students in this program have the option to complete the Arts & Science Internship Program (ASIP) stream.

Cell & Molecular Biology Major (Science Program) - ASMAJ1003

Students learn how genes and proteins organize cells for cellular activities, multicellular development, and cellular interactions with the environment. Students also learn how cell and molecular biology research is conducted, and receive training in advanced techniques of the field. Cell and molecular biology research is one the most demanding fields in science. Students gain an understanding of the field, and leave the program equipped to tackle fundamental scientific questions.

After foundational courses in first and second year, students participate in advanced lecture, seminar and laboratory courses, and are encouraged to apply for research project courses in the laboratories of the Department. Course offerings include gene expression, cell biology, developmental biology, plant development, plant-microbe interactions, plant signaling, neurogenesis, tissue morphogenesis, stem cell biology, genomics and proteomics.

Enrolment Requirements:

This is an open enrolment program. A student who has completed 4.0 credits may enrol in program.

Students in this program have the option to request enrolment in the Arts & Science Internship Program (ASIP) stream. Students can apply for the ASIP stream after Year 1 (Year 2 entry) or after Year 2 (Year 3 entry, starting Fall 2024). Full details about ASIP, including student eligibility, selection and enrolment, are available in the ASIP section of the Arts & Science Academic Calendar. Please note that the majority of students enter ASIP in Fall term of Year 2. Space is more limited for Year 3 entry. Students applying for Year 3 entry must have been admitted to the Cell & Molecular Biology Major in the Summer after Year 2.

Completion Requirements:

(8.0 credits)

First Year:

  1. BIO120H1, BIO130H1; ( CHM135H1, CHM136H1)/ CHM151Y1
  2. 1.0 credit from JMB170Y1/​ MAT135H1/​ MAT136H1/​ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1/​ PHY131H1/​ PHY132H1/​ PHY151H1/​ PHY152H1

Higher Years:

  1. BIO220H1, BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1
  2. BIO260H1/​ HMB265H1; BCH210H1
  3. CSB349H1
  4. 1.0 credit from: CSB327H1, CSB328H1, CSB329H1, CSB331H1, CSB340H1, CSB353H1
  5. 1.5 credits (at least 0.5 credit at the 400-level) from: BCH422H1, BCH426H1, BCH440H1, BCH444H1, BCH445H1, CJH332H1, CSB299Y1, CSB327H1, CSB328H1, CSB329H1, CSB330H1, CSB331H1, CSB340H1, CSB350H1, CSB351Y1, CSB352H1, CSB353H1, CSB360H1, CSB397Y0, CSB399Y1, CSB427H1, CSB428H1, CSB429H1, CSB430H1, CSB431H1, CSB435H1, CSB447H1, CSB450H1, CSB451H1, CSB452H1, CSB453H1, CSB454H1, CSB457H1, CSB458H1, CSB459H1, CSB460H1, CSB471H1, CSB472H1, CSB473H1, CSB474H1, CSB475H1, CSB483H1, CSB490H1, CSB491H1, CSB492H1, CSB497H1, CSB498Y1, CSB499Y1, HMB496Y1/​ HMB499Y1, MGY441H1, MGY480Y1. No more than 0.5 credit in BCH can be used towards this requirement.

The Cell & Molecular Biology Major Program has the additional option of a Disciplinary Focus.

Students in this program have the option to complete the Arts & Science Internship Program (ASIP) stream.

Cell & Molecular Biology Major: Focus in Molecular Networks of the Cell - ASMAJ1003A

Starting in 2nd year, this focus organizes a restricted number of highly motivated Cell and Molecular Biology Major students with an interest in Molecular Networks of the Cell. Focus students are required to complete a subset of related program courses and to participate in a learning community for the focus.

Enrolment Requirements:

Once you have enrolled in the Cell and Molecular Biology Major program, you have the option to apply for entry into a focus. The focuses have a limited enrolment and can only accommodate a restricted number of students with a particular interest in the topic of the focus. Students can only apply for one focus. Admission will be determined with a minimum grade of 80% in BIO130H1. If the student does not achieve 80% in BIO130H1, admission can be determined with a minimum grade of 80% in BIO230H1, BIO255H1 or CSB349H1. On the application form, students must include a 300-word statement of interest regarding the topic of the focus. Statement submission instructions are in the Undergraduate program section of the CSB website, http://csb.utoronto.ca. Achieving these requirements does not necessarily guarantee admission to the focus in any given year.

Students in a focus complete the requirements of First Year, the requirements 1.-3. of Higher Years, as well as requirements 4.-7. specific to each focus.

Each year students are enrolled in a focus, they must also be an active participant in the faculty-led learning community for their focus (requirement 7.). The learning community appears as a non-credit course recognized on the co-curricular record. Students who fail to contribute to the faculty-led learning community will be removed from the focus.

Completion Requirements:

This Focus is part of the Cell and Molecular Biology Major and begins with the requirements of First Year and of lines 1-3 of Higher Years of the Cell and Molecular Biology Major Program.

4. 1.0 credit from: CJH332H1, CSB327H1, CSB331H1, CSB353H1
5. 0.5 credit from: CSB427H1, CSB428H1, CSB429H1, CSB435H1, CSB451H1, CSB454H1, CSB457H1, CSB458H1, CSB459H1, CSB460H1, CSB475H1
6. 1.0 credit from: BCH422H1, BCH426H1, BCH444H1, BCH445H1, CJH332H1, CSB299Y1, CSB327H1, CSB330H1, CSB331H1, CSB353H1, CSB397Y0, CSB399Y1, CSB427H1, CSB428H1, CSB429H1, CSB435H1, CSB450H1, CSB451H1, CSB452H1, CSB454H1, CSB457H1, CSB458H1, CSB459H1, CSB460H1, CSB475H1, CSB490H1, CSB491H1, CSB497H1, CSB498Y1, CSB499Y1. No more than 0.5 credit in BCH can be used towards this requirement.
7. Molecular Network Learning Community (each year of focus enrolment)

Cell & Molecular Biology Major: Focus in Plant Genomics and Biotechnology - ASMAJ1003B

Starting in 2nd year, this focus organizes a restricted number of highly motivated Cell and Molecular Biology Major students with an interest in Plant Genomics and Biotechnology. Focus students are required to complete a subset of related program courses and to participate in a learning community for the focus.

Enrolment Requirements:

Once you have enrolled in the Cell and Molecular Biology Major program, you have the option to apply for entry into a focus. The focuses have a limited enrolment and can only accommodate a restricted number of students with a particular interest in the topic of the focus. Students can only apply for one focus. Admission will be determined with a minimum grade of 80% in BIO130H1. If the student does not achieve 80% in BIO130H1, admission can be determined with a minimum grade of 80% in BIO230H1, BIO255H1 or CSB349H1. On the application form, students must include a 300-word statement of interest regarding the topic of the focus. Statement submission instructions are in the Undergraduate program section of the CSB website, http://csb.utoronto.ca. Achieving these requirements does not necessarily guarantee admission to the focus in any given year.

Students in a focus complete the requirements of First Year, the requirements 1.-3. of Higher Years, as well as requirements 4.-7 specific to each focus.

Each year students are enrolled in a focus, they must also be an active participant in the faculty-led learning community for their focus (requirement 7.). The learning community appears as a non-credit course recognized on the co-curricular record. Students who fail to contribute to the faculty-led learning community will be removed from the focus.

Completion Requirements:

This Focus is part of the Cell and Molecular Biology Major and begins with the requirements of First Year and of lines 1-3 of Higher Years of the Cell and Molecular Biology Major Program.

4. 1.0 credit from: CSB340H1, CSB350H1/​ CSB352H1, CSB353H1
5. 0.5 credit from: CSB435H1, CSB450H1, CSB451H1, CSB452H1, CSB454H1, CSB459H1, CSB460H1, CSB471H1, CSB472H1, CSB473H1, CSB474H1, CSB475H1
6. 1.0 credit from: CSB299Y1, CSB330H1, CSB340H1, CSB350H1, CSB351Y1, CSB352H1, CSB353H1, CSB397Y0, CSB399Y1, CSB435H1, CSB450H1, CSB451H1, CSB452H1, CSB454H1, CSB459H1, CSB460H1, CSB471H1, CSB472H1, CSB473H1, CSB474H1, CSB475H1, CSB490H1, CSB491H1, CSB497H1, CSB498Y1, CSB499Y1.
7. Plant Biotech Learning Community (each year of focus enrolment)

Cell & Molecular Biology Major: Focus in Stem Cells and Developmental Biology - ASMAJ1003C

Starting in 2nd year, this focus organizes a restricted number of highly motivated Cell and Molecular Biology Major students with an interest in Stem Cells and Developmental Biology. Focus students are required to complete a subset of related program courses and to participate in a learning community for the focus.

Enrolment Requirements:

Once you have enrolled in the Cell and Molecular Biology Major program, you have the option to apply for entry into a focus. The focuses have a limited enrolment and can only accommodate a restricted number of students with a particular interest in the topic of the focus. Students can only apply for one focus. Admission will be determined with a minimum grade of 80% in BIO130H1. If the student does not achieve 80% in BIO130H1, admission can be determined with a minimum grade of 80% in BIO230H1, BIO255H1 or CSB349H1. On the application form, students must include a 300-word statement of interest regarding the topic of the focus. Statement submission instructions are in the Undergraduate program section of the CSB website, http://csb.utoronto.ca. Achieving these requirements does not necessarily guarantee admission to the focus in any given year.

Students in a focus complete the requirements of First Year, the requirements 1-3 of Higher Years, as well as requirements 4-7 specific to each focus.

Each year students are enrolled in a focus, they must also be an active participant in the faculty-led learning community for their focus (requirement 7). The learning community appears as a non-credit course recognized on the co-curricular record. Students who fail to contribute to the faculty-led learning community will be removed from the focus.

Completion Requirements:

This Focus is part of the Cell and Molecular Biology Major and begins with the requirements of First Year and of lines 1-3 of Higher Years of the Cell and Molecular Biology Major Program.

4. 1.0 credit from: CSB328H1, CSB329H1, CSB340H1
5. 0.5 credit from: CSB427H1, CSB429H1, CSB430H1, CSB431H1, CSB483H1
6. 1.0 credit from: CSB299Y1, CSB328H1, CSB329H1, CSB340H1, CSB397Y0, CSB399Y1, CSB427H1, CSB429H1, CSB430H1, CSB431H1, CSB453H1, CSB483H1, CSB497H1, CSB498Y1, CSB499Y1.
7. Multicellularity Learning Community (each year of focus enrolment)

Genome Biology Major (Science Program) - ASMAJ2655

Enrolment Requirements:

This is an open enrolment program. A student who has completed 4.0 credits may enrol in the program.

Students in this program have the option to request enrolment in the Arts & Science Internship Program (ASIP) stream. Students can apply for the ASIP stream after Year 1 (Year 2 entry) or after Year 2 (Year 3 entry, starting Fall 2024). Full details about ASIP, including student eligibility, selection and enrolment, are available in the ASIP section of the Arts & Science Academic Calendar. Please note that the majority of students enter ASIP in Fall term of Year 2. Space is more limited for Year 3 entry. Students applying for Year 3 entry must have been admitted to the Genome Biology Major in the Summer after Year 2.

Completion Requirements:

This program is a joint program of the departments of Cell & Systems Biology, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, and Molecular Genetics. It is administered through the Department of Cell & Systems Biology.

(8.0 credits)

First year: BIO120H1, BIO130H1; ( CHM135H1, CHM136H1)/ CHM151Y1; ( MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1

Higher years:
1. BIO220H1, BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1; BIO260H1/​ HMB265H1; EEB225H1/​ STA220H1
2. Genomics fundamentals: BCH311H1/​ CSB349H1/​ MGY311Y1, CSB352H1; EEB323H1
3. 0.5 credit laboratory course from: CSB472H1, CSB474H1; EEB460H1
4. 1.0 credit genomics elective from: CSB330H1, CSB350H1, CSB397Y0, CSB427H1, CSB435H1, CSB450H1, CSB457H1, CSB458H1, CSB471H1, CSB473H1, CSB490H1, CSB491H1, CSB497H1/​ CSB498Y1/​ CSB499Y1; EEB362H1, EEB455H1, EEB458H1, EEB459H1, EEB462H1, EEB463H1, EEB397Y1/​ EEB497H1/​ EEB498Y1/​ EEB499Y1; EHJ352H1; MGY350H1, MGY360H1, MGY428H1, MGY470H1, MGY480Y1

NOTE: Students taking CSB397Y0, CSB490H1, CSB491H1, CSB497H1/​ CSB498Y1/​ CSB499Y1, EEB397Y1/​ EEB497H1/​ EEB498Y1/​ EEB499Y1 or MGY480Y1 are encouraged to conduct a genomics-related research project.

Students in this program have the option to complete the Arts & Science Internship Program (ASIP) stream.


Biology: see Biology 
Genome Biology: see Biology

 

Lab Materials Fee

Some courses in this department have a mandatory Lab Materials Fee to cover non-reusable materials. The fee for each such course is given below in the course description, and will be included on the student’s invoice on ACORN.

Cell and Systems Biology Courses

BIO130H1 - Molecular and Cell Biology

Hours: 36L/15P

One of the goals of modern biology is to understand how the basic building blocks of life give rise to biological form and function. This course provides students with a common lexicon to understand the key principles and concepts in molecular and cell biology, with a focus on how the building blocks of life lead to functioning cells. (Lab Materials Fee: approximately $11). Lab coat and safety glasses are required for use in laboratories; students are responsible for purchasing these items (approximate cost is $26).

Prerequisite: SBI4U and SCH4U (Grade 12 University Preparation Biology and Chemistry) or permission of department. Please contact bio130@utoronto.ca for more information.
Exclusion:
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB195H1 - Computational Biology Foundations

Hours: 24L/12T

Our understanding of life is built from observation, abstraction, modeling, and comparison. In this First Year Foundations course we explore how these activities are based on concepts of chance and choice, of organization and dispersion, of cooperation and conflict, and how these ideas inform domains such as statistics, computer science, bioinformatics, molecular biology, physiology and ecology. Through this, we build a broad framework of relationships and connections that will make students’ engagement with specialized courses throughout the sciences all the more meaningful. This course's focus on best practices of structuring project work, using tools and resources, and documentation, will be valuable preparation for all subsequent courses. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB196H1 - Genes, Genomes and Us

Hours: 24L

With the completion of the human genome sequence, we now have access to more information than ever before about our genetic make-up. This course addresses topics such as what are genes, how are they identified and how does knowledge about genes impact society. Students will learn basic concepts in genetics. Using this conceptual foundation, the significance of genomic research for understanding human biology, and the social consequences that may result from it, will be discussed. Evaluation is based on class discussions, homework, oral presentation and written assignments. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB197H1 - Human Viruses

Hours: 24L

This course allows students to broaden their knowledge about the most important human viruses and prions. In essence, what viruses are, what they do, what are the diseases caused by viruses and how they are transmitted, etc., and what can be done about them (vaccines, antiviral treatments, etc.). Viruses cause many diseases ranging from a benign rash to severe hemorrhages and death. Each student will select a specific topic in Virology and write an essay and present a seminar for the rest of the class. Major "hot" problems in Virology from pandemics to controversial vaccines will also be discussed. Two tests covering all materials presented by all the students' seminars will be conducted. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB198H1 - Cell and Molecular Biology in the News

Hours: 24L

The pace of knowledge creation in the fields of cell and molecular biology has greatly increased in the 21st century and with it, the need for greater scientific literacy. In this course, we will teach students to find reliable sources of information in order to understand the basic concepts underlying the research reported in these media releases, with the ultimate aim of critically evaluating these reports. Through exploration of various media articles in cell and molecular biology (with an emphasis on humans), students will be able to apply what they have learned to current events, as well as relevant issues in their lives and society as a whole. Students will be assessed through short-written assignments, class discussions, an oral presentation, and a final project where they will get the opportunity to explore the research behind a media article of their choice. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB199H1 - Biotechnology and Society

Hours: 24L

From the manipulation of genes of plants for improved food production through to human tissue engineering and stem cell research, biotechnology is increasingly playing a major role in our world. Society, however, is often challenged by the rapid advances in our knowledge in these areas, and how to best apply these technologies in a manner that is socially responsible and economically viable. In this seminar course, students will research and describe various applications of biotechnology using information obtained from reputable sources, and lead discussions on the benefits and concerns that arise from this research. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB201H1 - Molecular Biology, Biotechnology and You

Hours: 24L/12T

An online course intended to provide non-science students with an understanding of basic concepts in molecular biology and genetics, with particular emphasis on humans. Students will work online in groups on problem sets. The course will end with an introduction to biotechnology, including an opportunity for students to use their new knowledge to explore a real, multi-dimensional problem (e.g., cancer). Lectures will be delivered via the web and mandatory tutorials will require live webinar participation. The final exam will require attendance on the St. George campus. This course does not count towards CSB programs.

Exclusion: BIO130H1, BIO230H1, BIO255H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB202H1 - Further Exploration in Biotechnology

Hours: 24L/12T

Provides non-science students with an additional opportunity to explore biotechnology and its applications in agriculture, the environment, and human health including: genetically modified organisms, drug discovery and aging. Most lectures are viewed online before class and students work in groups during class on problem sets and case studies designed to stimulate further learning, enhance evidence-based reasoning, and promote reflection on the role of biotechnology in society. This course does not count towards CSB programs. CSB201H1 is not a prerequisite for this course.

Exclusion: BIO230H1, BIO255H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BIO230H1 - From Genes to Organisms

Hours: 36L/15P

The genome is the "book of life," providing instructions to construct an organism. This course introduces genome biology and explores how the building blocks of life are networked into functioning organisms. We will investigate how cells perceive internal and external cues, how gene expression is shaped by this perception, and how these events give rise to tissues, organs, and whole organisms. (Lab Materials Fee: approximately $16). Lab coat and safety glasses are required for use in laboratories; students are responsible for purchasing these items (approximate cost is $26).

Prerequisite: BIO130H1, ( CHM135H1, CHM136H1)/( CHM138H1, CHM139H1)/ CHM151Y1
Exclusion: BIO255H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BIO255H1 - From Genes to Organisms with Advanced Laboratory

Hours: 36L/33P

The genome is the "book of life," providing instructions to construct an organism. This course introduces genome biology and explores how the building blocks of life are networked into functioning organisms. We will investigate how cells perceive internal and external cues, how gene expression is shaped by this perception, and how these events give rise to tissues, organs, and whole organisms. The Enhanced Laboratory provides the opportunity for greater laboratory skill development in modern investigative techniques and is intended for students interested in conducting their own laboratory research. (Lab Materials Fee: $52). Lab coat and safety glasses are required for use in laboratories; students are responsible for purchasing these items (approximate cost is $26).

Prerequisite: BIO130H1, ( CHM135H1, CHM136H1)/( CHM138H1, CHM139H1)/ CHM151Y1, cGPA 3.0
Exclusion: BIO230H1
Recommended Preparation: BCH210H1 (taken concurrently or previously)
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BIO260H1 - Concepts in Genetics

Hours: 48L/12T

This is a problem based course which discusses classical, molecular, developmental, and population genetics and genomics with emphasis on model organisms for genetic analysis.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/ BIO255H1
Exclusion: HMB265H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BIO270H1 - Animal Physiology I

Hours: 24L/9P

Animal physiology is a biological sub-discipline that aims to understand, in physical and chemical terms, how animals work. This course uses examples from throughout the animal kingdom, in a comparative approach, to introduce and study homeostasis and the endocrine system. Accompanying laboratories reinforce concepts introduced in lectures and provide opportunities for students to experience firsthand the role that experimentation, data collection, interpretation of data, and communication of data plays in the nature of the scientific process. (Lab Materials Fee: approximately $11). Lab coat and safety glasses are required for use in laboratories; students are responsible for purchasing these items (approximate cost is $26).

Prerequisite: BIO130H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BIO271H1 - Animal Physiology II

Hours: 24L/9P

Animal physiology is a biological sub-discipline that aims to understand, in physical and chemical terms, how animals work. This course uses examples from throughout the animal kingdom in a comparative approach to introduce and study the nervous and cardiorespiratory systems. Accompanying laboratories reinforce concepts introduced in lectures and provide opportunities for students to experience firsthand the role that experimentation, data collection, interpretation of data, and communication of data plays in the nature of the scientific process. (Lab Materials Fee: approximately $11). Lab coat and safety glasses are required for use in laboratories; students are responsible for purchasing these items (approximate cost is $26).

Prerequisite: BIO270H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB299Y1 - Research Opportunity Program

Credit course for supervised participation in faculty research project. Details at https://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/academics/research-opportunities/research-opportunities-program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

CSB325H1 - Endocrine Physiology

Hours: 24L/9T

The regulation of physiological processes by hormones and other signalling molecules in non-human chordates. An integrated genes-to-environment approach is used to examine aspects of hormonal evolution, physiological information flow, behaviour and neuroendocrinology, and xenobiotic endocrine disruptors.  Students will have the opportunity to research areas of their own interest via group interaction in a series of tutorial sessions.

Prerequisite: BIO270H1, BIO271H1
Recommended Preparation: EEB266H1, EEB267H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB327H1 - Extracellular Matrix Dynamics and Associated Pathologies

Hours: 36L

Examines the expression, structure and function of the four major classes of ECM macromolecules: collagen, proteoglycans, non-collagenous structural proteins and glycoproteins. In addition to forming elaborate networks that give tissues and organs their unique architectural design and biomechanical properties, ECM molecules act as potent regulators of all cellular activities. Emphasis is placed on the morphoregulatory contribution(s) of ECM molecules to normal and pathological development.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/ BIO255H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB328H1 - Animal Developmental Biology

Hours: 24L/24P

Basic concepts in developmental biology. Early development of invertebrates and vertebrates will be discussed with emphasis on experimental and molecular analysis of developmental mechanisms. Tutorials focus on the experimental analysis of embryonic development and regeneration, and discuss primary literature of selected topics in developmental biology. (Lab Materials Fee: approximately $26). A lab coat and safety glasses are required for use in laboratories; students are responsible for purchasing these (approximate cost is $26).

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/ BIO255H1, BIO260H1/ HMB265H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB329H1 - Stem Cell Biology: Developmental Models and Cell-based Therapeutics

Hours: 24L/12T

Stem cells provide the basis for cellular diversity in multicellular organisms and have enormous therapeutic potential in regenerative medicine. The course will introduce students to the differences and similarities between stem cells from different organisms, their roles throughout development and therapeutic potential.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1
Recommended Preparation: BIO260H1/ HMB265H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB330H1 - Techniques in Molecular and Cell Biology

Hours: 8L/52P

Laboratory course on molecular and cell biology research techniques used to study genes and proteins. Topics include plasmid cloning, PCR, bioinformatics, gene expression analyses, protein-protein interactions, and protein subcellular localization. (Lab Materials Fee: $52). A lab coat and safety glasses are required for use in laboratories; students are responsible for purchasing these (approximate cost is $26).

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/ BIO255H1, BIO260H1/ HMB265H1
Recommended Preparation: BCH311H1/ CSB349H1/ MGY311Y1 taken concurrently
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BCB330Y1 - Special Project in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology

An opportunity for specialized individual research in bioinformatics and computational biology by arrangement with a supervisor. Approval of the application by the BCB coordinator is required.  Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Permission of the course coordinator (application required). Significant background in both life science and computer science courses is required.
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSB331H1 - Advanced Cell Biology

Hours: 36L

The development of multicellular organisms is dependent on complex cell-cell and cell-matrix dynamics. The course examines the molecules and mechanisms involved and how they act in concert to regulate distinct developmental and physiological events. Emphasis is placed on the experimental approaches and technology used to study the molecular interactions and dynamics that alter structure-function relationships in cells and organisms.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/ BIO255H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CJH332H1 - Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology of the Synapse

Previous Course Number: CSB332H1

Hours: 36L

Examination of all aspects of the synapse in both the peripheral and central nervous systems of invertebrates and vertebrates. Topics include: neuroplasticity, synapse formation, synaptic transmission, synaptic modulation, and the molecular biological basis of neurodegenerative disorders.

Prerequisite: BIO271H1/ PSL300H1
Exclusion: CSB332H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB340H1 - Plant Development

Hours: 24L

Plant developmental genetics at the molecular, cellular and organismal level, generation and use of genomic resources in plant model organisms. Questions address the genetic dissection of plant embryo and meristem development, plant stem cell specification and tissue patterning. Genomic approaches applicable to plant biotechnology are also covered.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/ BIO255H1, BIO260H1/( HMB265H1 with a minimum grade of 73%)
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB343H1 - Animal Energetics

Hours: 24L

Animal structure and function, at all levels from molecule to whole animal, are dependent on energy. This course describes how the supply, consumption, transformation, exchange and storage of energy can facilitate, constrain and limit animal function. Emphasis is placed on systems level physiological function and whole animal performance.

Prerequisite: ( BIO270H1, BIO271H1)/( PSL300H1, PSL301H1)
Recommended Preparation: BCH210H1/ BCH242Y1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB346H1 - Neurobiology of Respiration

Hours: 24L/12T

This course examines how the central and peripheral nervous system controls breathing in mammals. Topics include how the brain generates rhythmic breathing movements, how sleep impacts breathing control and how abnormal breathing contributes to disorders such as sleep apnea.

Prerequisite: ( BIO270H1, BIO271H1)/( PSL300H1, PSL301H1)
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB348H1 - Laboratory in Comparative Animal Physiology

Hours: 48P

Laboratory exercises will include traditional and guided inquiry approaches to investigate and gain an understanding of the regulation of physiological systems in vertebrates and invertebrates. Students will experience the nature of physiological investigation while being exposed to a range of the current experimental approaches animal physiologists use to design, test and evaluate hypotheses, and communicate their findings. This course will emphasize the fundamental characteristics humans share with all animal life and the physiological adaptations that have permitted species to exploit alternative environmental niches. This course requires participation and includes group work, written assignments, and oral presentations. (Lab Materials Fee: $52). Lab coat and safety glasses are required for use in laboratories; students are responsible for purchasing these items (approximate cost is $26).

Prerequisite: BIO230H1
Exclusion: PSL372H1
Recommended Preparation: BIO270H1, BIO271H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB349H1 - Eukaryotic Gene Expression

Hours: 30L/18T

Genome structure and the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. Topics include transcription, gene silencing and regulation, expression profiling, non-coding RNAs, and translational control. Tutorials emphasize problem based learning exercises that relate to recent advances in the broad field of eukaryotic gene expression.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/ BIO255H1, BIO260H1/ HMB265H1
Exclusion: MGY311Y1, MGY420H1
Recommended Preparation: BCH210H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB350H1 - Laboratory in Molecular Plant Biology

Hours: 24L/36P

Laboratory methods used in plant molecular biology research. Topics include vector construction, plant transformations, PCR, DNA blots, high-throughput screens, genetic mapping, and bioinformatic analyses. (Lab Materials Fee: $52). Lab coat and safety glasses are required for use in laboratories; students are responsible for purchasing these items (approximate cost is $26).

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/ BIO255H1
Recommended Preparation: BIO251H1 or higher level plant biology course; BCH311H1/ CSB349H1/ MGY311Y1 concurrently
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB351Y1 - Introductory Virology

Hours: 48L/48T

An introduction to basic and medical virology. What you should know about viruses and the diseases they cause. Tutorials are optional.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/ BIO255H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB352H1 - Bioinformatic Methods

Hours: 6L/18P

Use of available programs for analyzing biological data. This is an introductory course with a strong emphasis on hands-on methods. Some theory is introduced, but the main focus is on using extant bioinformatics tools to analyze data and generate biological hypotheses.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/ BIO255H1, BIO260H1/ HMB265H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB353H1 - Plant-Microorganism Interactions and Plant Immunity

Hours: 24L

Plants have co-evolved with microbes ever since their first appearance on land, resulting in sophisticated strategies of pathogenicity, symbiosis, commensalisms and mutualism by microorganisms. This course presents an overview of the strategies by both plant hosts and microorganisms for their survival.  The lecture content includes the basic concepts of plant-microbe interactions and plant immunity as well as signal transduction in plant immunity.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/ BIO255H1
Recommended Preparation: BIO251H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB360H1 - Genetic Foundation of Molecular Biology

Hours: 24L

This course provides in depth foundational knowledge underlying molecular biology technologies. It focuses on how genetic principles were applied to develop the most commonly used molecular biology techniques today. Students will expand their genetic knowledge from introductory level genetic courses. This course does not involve explaining the basics of molecular biology such as replication, recombination, translation or gene expression. By contrast, this course expects that students already understand these concepts in detail and now apply this understanding towards how they were used to develop experimental technologies. For example, how are transformation, mutagenesis, plasmid construction, and gene expression systems used to design molecular experiments.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/ BIO255H1, BIO260H1/ HMB265H1, CSB349H1
Exclusion: MGY340H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB397Y0 - Research Abroad in Cell & Systems Biology

An independent research project conducted in molecular biology, cell biology, developmental biology, neurobiology, physiology or systems biology. Whole organism, cell culture, in vitro or in silico studies are acceptable. The laboratory research is conducted by the student and supervised by a faculty member at an approved partner university. An information session is held each fall, and an application and interview process is required. The research is typically conducted from May to August. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of 73% in BIO230H1/ BIO255H1/ BIO271H1 and permission of the CSB397Y0 coordinator
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB398Y0 - Research Excursions

An instructor-supervised group project in an off-campus setting. Details at https://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/academics/research-opportunities/research-excursions-program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

CSB399Y1 - Research Opportunity Program

Credit course for supervised participation in faculty research project. Details at https://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/academics/research-opportunities/research-opportunities-program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

BCB410H1 - Applied Bioinformatics

Hours: 24L

Practical introduction to concepts, standards and tools for the implementation of strategies in bioinformatics and computational biology. Student led discussions plus a strong component of hands-on exercises.

Prerequisite: BCH311H1/ CSB349H1/ MGY311Y1; ( CSC324H1/ CSC373H1/ CSC375H1). Students who do not have the stated prerequisites are encouraged to contact the course coordinator.
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

BCB420H1 - Computational Systems Biology

Hours: 24L

Current approaches to using the computer for analyzing and modeling biology as integrated molecular systems. Lectures plus hands-on practical exercises. The course extends and complements an introductory Bioinformatics course.

Prerequisite: BCH441H1/ MGY441H1/ BCB410H1 and good working knowledge of R
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSB426H1 - Physiology of Stress and Reproduction

Hours: 12L/24S

Students will gain an integrated understanding of how organismal and cellular stress affects the process of reproduction. The focus will be primarily on chordates and will examine genetic, cellular, organismal, behavioural, and social levels of interaction.

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of 73% in CSB325H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB427H1 - Drosophila as a Model in Cancer Research

Hours: 12L/12T/12S

Use of the genetic model organism Drosophila in biomedical research with specific emphasis on cancer research. Students will read, discuss and present classical papers and current literature in the field to enhance their ability to critically evaluate the primary scientific literature.

Prerequisite: BIO260H1/ HMB265H1, two of CSB328H1/ CSB331H1/ CSB349H1/ MGY350H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB428H1 - Cytoskeletal Networks of the Cell

Hours: 12L/12T/12S

The cytoskeleton is a highly dynamic protein network that links all regions and components of the cell to provide a structural framework for organizing numerous cellular activities. This course will explore the molecular regulation of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons during cell migration and other cellular processes. Topics will include (1) an overview of key regulators of the cytoskeleton, (2) how they organize specific cellular structures, and (3) how the coordinated activities of cytoskeletal networks govern complex cellular behaviours. The format of this course is mainly journal club style presentations and student-led discussions of research papers, together with supporting background lectures. Experience with critical evaluation of research papers is emphasized.

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of 73% in BCH311H1/ CSB349H1/ MGY311Y1, minimum grade of 73% in BCH340H1/ CJH332H1/ CSB328H1/ CSB329H1/ CSB331H1/ CSB340H1/ CSB397Y0
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB429H1 - Germ Cell Biology

Hours: 12L/12T/12S

This course will discuss the genetic and cell biological aspects of the development of gametes, gonads, and sex related traits in animals, including invertebrates and vertebrates.  The course consists of lectures and student seminars, and is based on the discussion of primary scientific literature.  Not recommended for students with fewer than 14.0 credits.

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of 77% in CSB328H1/ CSB340H1/ CSB349H1/ MGY311Y1/ MGY312H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB430H1 - Neurogenesis

Hours: 24L/12T

An examination of the molecular and cellular basis of neurogenesis in development and adult nervous systems. Experimental evidence from recent studies in selected invertebrate and vertebrate model systems will be discussed. Topics include neural stem cells, regional specialization of neurogenesis, neuronal and glial differentiation, extrinsic regulation of neurogenesis, adult neurogenesis, and the evolution of neurogenesis. Students are expected to have a basic knowledge of molecular genetics, developmental biology and/or neuroanatomy. Lectures will be complemented by student directed seminars that focus on specialized research studies published in leading scientific journals.

Prerequisite: BIO260H1/ HMB265H1, CSB328H1/ CSB349H1/( HMB200H1, HMB320H1)
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BCB430Y1 - Advanced Special Project in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology

An opportunity for advanced specialized individual research in bioinformatics and computational biology by arrangement with a supervisor. Approval of the application by the BCB coordinator is required.  BCB330Y1 is a recommended preparation for this course however students should not normally conduct their project in the same laboratory or continue their previous project. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Permission of the course coordinator (application required). Significant background in both life science and computer science courses is required.
Recommended Preparation: BCB330Y1
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSB431H1 - Evolution and Development: Gastrulation

Hours: 12L/12T/12S

Gastrulation is used to examine the molecular and cellular mechanisms of a major morphogenetic process and its evolutionary modifications.  This course includes small group discussions and presentations.  Controversial issues presented in the lectures are debated.

Prerequisite: CSB328H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB432H1 - Advanced Topics in Cellular Neurophysiology

Hours: 12L/24S

This course examines cellular neurophysiological processes in the developing and mature nervous systems with a focus on: (1) understanding modern techniques used in neurophysiological research; and (2) interpreting the results from neurophysiological peer-reviewed manuscripts. This course is interactive and requires students to contribute actively during lectures and seminars, including conducting a group presentation.

Prerequisite: CJH332H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB434H1 - Introduction & Methods of Systems Neuroscience

Hours: 12L/12P/12S

Our brain is highly complex with billions of neurons; how do neurons work together to produce adaptive & flexible behaviors? Systems neuroscience studies this question at the systems level. Using various animal models, it aims to provide quantitative and causal links between neural circuits/networks and perception, behavior, and cognition. Through this course, you will learn about the popular animal models with simpler brains and interpret the neural mechanisms from multiple perspectives, to acquire a quantitative understanding. Particularly, this course will emphasize interdisciplinary technology, such as large-scale optical neural recording and computational tools. Knowledge gained will provide insights into understanding mental disorders and artificial intelligence.

Prerequisite: Minimum 75% in MAT136H1, and minimum 75% in BIO271H1/ CJH332H1/ PSL300H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB435H1 - Regulatory Networks and Systems in Molecular Biology

Hours: 24L/12T

After a review of the basic mechanisms of gene regulation and signaling, this course will expose students to several technological and methodological tools for systematically dissecting regulatory networks and systems. Emphasis is on extracting global insight from genome-scale molecular biology datasets. Students will participate in class discussions of research papers, solve systems biology problems using the R statistical software and write an independent paper.

Prerequisite: BCH311H1/ CSB349H1/ MGY311Y1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB445H1 - Sleep Biology in Health and Disease

Hours: 3L/33S

This course covers theories in why and how we sleep. It will focus on the biological functions of sleep, how the brain generates different sleep states and how a breakdown in sleep mechanisms contribute to sleep disorders like insomnia, sleep walking and narcolepsy. This course emphasizes student participation in seminar discussion and debates.

Prerequisite: ( BIO270H1, BIO271H1)/( PSL300H1, PSL301H1)
Recommended Preparation: CJH332H1/ CSB345H1/ PSY397H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB447H1 - Living Without Oxygen: Microbes to Mammals

Hours: 18L/18S

In-depth examination of the unique cellular adaptations of different organisms and tissues to survival in low oxygen environments.  Cellular, physiological and biochemical strategies, and systemic and whole organism responses will be investigated to uncover broad-ranging common strategies employed by diverse organisms to live without oxygen and in other stressful environments.

Prerequisite: ( BIO270H1, BIO271H1)/( PSL300H1, PSL301H1)
Exclusion: CSB347H1, NUS348H0
Recommended Preparation: BCH210H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB450H1 - Proteomics in Systems Biology

Hours: 24L

A discussion on current proteomic approaches to understand biological processes. The role of mass spectrometry, gel electrophoresis, protein-protein interaction and structural biology in understanding how proteins function in pathways and interaction networks will be discussed.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/ BIO255H1, BCH210H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB451H1 - Seminar in Plant Cell Biology

Hours: 6L/30S

Plants represent roughly 80% of the biomass on our planet and are essential primary producers in our ecosystems. At the cellular level, plants display some fascinating differences from other eukaryotic cells, including fragmentation of the secretory pathway, dramatic changes to cytoskeleton organization, and other adaptations to life as a pressurized cell. This course will examine and discuss examples from the primary scientific literature that highlight these distinct features of plant cells by contrasting them to animal cells. We will also discuss how these discoveries can contribute to addressing global challenges, such as developing innovative biomaterials, enhancing food security and cultivating renewable biofuels.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/ BIO255H1, BIO260H1/ HMB265H1
Recommended Preparation: BCH311H1/ BIO251H1/ CSB330H1/ CSB340H1/ CSB349H1/ CSB350H1/ MGY311Y1/ MGY340H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB452H1 - Molecular Interactions Between Plants and Microorganisms

Hours: 24L

This course explores the interactions between plants and both pathogenic and beneficial microorganisms at the molecular level. The course consists of two sections: 1. Plant-pathogenic microbe interactions and plant immunity and 2. Plant-beneficial microbe interactions and plant microbiome. The first section focuses on an in-depth discussion about on-going research of plant immunity against pathogenic microbes. The second section introduces the interaction of plant-beneficial microorganisms and their biotechnological usage for agriculture and food production.

Prerequisite: BCH311H1/ CSB349H1/ MGY311Y1
Recommended Preparation: CSB353H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB453H1 - Topics in Cell and Developmental Biology: Biology of Adherens Junctions

Hours: 12L/24S

Understanding how epithelial cells stick together to form tissues and organs, how they withstand mechanical forces, and how the loss of this adhesion leads to diseases such as cancer and its metastasis, are important fundamental questions in biology with significant implications for human health. Adherens junctions (AJs) are known to be dynamic plasma-membrane structures that mediate cell-cell adhesion and promote tissue integrity. In this course, we will discuss primary scientific literature to understand how AJs facilitate multicellular development and how they impact disease. Lectures will be complemented by student-led presentations of important research papers published in leading scientific journals.

Prerequisite: CSB331H1/ CSB328H1/ CSB349H1/ MGY311Y1/ BCH311H1, BIO230H1/ BIO255H1, BIO260H1/ HMB265H1
Recommended Preparation: BIO130H1, CSB331H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB454H1 - Pathogenic Effector Biology

Hours: 12L/12S

Microbial pathogens inject effector proteins into host cells in order to sabotage cellular systems and favor the infection process. This course explores the molecular details of how cellular systems (e.g., secretion, cytoskeleton and signaling) are manipulated by pathogenic effectors to promote the infection process, while emphasizing interesting structural and biochemical features of effector biology along the way. The course will also compare and contrast the strategies employed by plant versus animal pathogens, and how immune systems have evolved to cope with cellular hijacking by pathogenic effector molecules. The course will be based on the primary research literature and involve a combination of lectures and critical discussions of research papers.

Prerequisite: BCH311H1/ CSB349H1/ MGY311Y1
Recommended Preparation: MGY377H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB457H1 - Post-transcriptional Gene Regulation

Hours: 12L/24S

This course focuses on advances in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Topics include regulatory RNAs, RNA processing, localization, translation, and degradation. In addition to lectures covering background material, emphasis is placed on current research and involves discussion of primary literature in a round-table format.

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of 70% in BCH311H1/ CSB349H1/ MGY311Y1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB458H1 - Epigenetics

Hours: 36S

A seminar course exploring non-Mendelian phenomena in plants, fungi and animals that reveal aspects of genome organization and regulation that may provide insight into genome function and evolution.

Prerequisite: BIO260H1/ HMB265H1, BCH311H1/ CSB349H1/ MGY311Y1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB459H1 - Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology

Hours: 24L

This course introduces students to major features of gene expression and signal transduction in plants. Topics include strategies for generating transgenic plants and regulating gene expression, as well as the importance of signal transduction in plant growth and survival. How plants sense and respond at the molecular level to environmental stresses such as drought, salinity, cold and disease will be discussed. The application of this basic scientific information in biotechnological strategies for improving agronomic traits will also be addressed.

Prerequisite: BCH311H1/ CSB349H1/ MGY311Y1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB460H1 - Plant Signal Transduction

Hours: 24L

Plant development, ecological adaptation and crop plant productivity depend on the sophisticated potential of plants to sense and compute signals to regulate their responses. An arsenal of genetic and genomic tools is employed to elucidate these plant signal transduction pathways. Examples from the original literature will be used to introduce general concepts of plant signal transduction, molecular biology and genomics and their application in understanding and influencing plant growth and development.

Prerequisite: BCH311H1/ CSB349H1/ MGY311Y1 or permission of instructor
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB471H1 - Foundational Discoveries in Genome Biology and Bioinformatics: AlphaFold2 and its implications

Hours: 24S

This course is based on the critical analysis of key research articles in genome biology and bioinformatics. The format is interactive and requires students to contribute actively during class meetings. Small student groups will be assigned to present context, figures, data, methods and impact from a number of research articles during the semester. Based on the readings, small student groups will propose new genome technologies or datasets and new bioinformatics software or databases.

Prerequisite: BCB330Y1/ ( BCH441H1/ MGY441H1)/ CSB352H1/ CSB472H1/ EHJ352H1/ MGY428H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB472H1 - Computational Genomics and Bioinformatics

Hours: 24L/12T

Computational analyses of DNA and RNA expression data. Understanding biological databases, sequence alignment, sequence annotation, gene prediction, computational analysis of function, motif analysis, phylogenetic analysis, and gene expression profiling analysis. Applied, theoretical and statistical issues will be addressed.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/ BIO255H1
Recommended Preparation: BIO260H1/ HMB265H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB473H1 - Chemical Genomics

Hours: 24L

This course surveys the field of Chemical Genomics, focusing on the analysis of biological problems using chemical approaches. Topics covered include chemical genetics, combinatorial chemistry and combinatorial strategies in molecular biology. Examines both the underlying biological and chemical concepts; however, the focus is primarily biological.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/ BIO255H1, BIO260H1/ HMB265H1, CHM247H1/ CHM249H1/any 300+ CHM course
Recommended Preparation: BCH210H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB474H1 - Methods in Genomics and Proteomics

Hours: 48P

This is a hands-on, laboratory based course offered in conjunction with the Centre for the Analysis of Genome Evolution and Function (CAGEF). It will teach students how to produce and analyze data that are central to the fields of genomics and proteomics. Techniques taught include DNA and RNA extractions, PCR, Next Generation DNA library preparation and sequencing, expression profiling using RNAseq, protein extraction, 2D-gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.  This will be combined with associated bioinformatics analyses. (Lab Materials Fee: $52). A lab coat and safety glasses are required for use in laboratories; students are responsible for purchasing these (approximate cost is $26).

Prerequisite: BIO260H1/ HMB265H1, BIO255H1/ CSB330H1/ CSB350H1 or by permission of the instructor
Recommended Preparation: BCH311H1/ CSB349H1/ MGY311Y1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB475H1 - Plant Metabolomics

Hours: 24L

This course introduces students to major features of plant metabolism. The content covers plant physiology, natural product chemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and genomics. Topics also include strategies for designing how we modulate metabolic pathways and how we utilize plants for biotechnology through metabolic engineering.

Prerequisite: BCH311H1/ CSB349H1/ MGY311Y1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB483H1 - Seminar in Development

Hours: 24S

Seminars analyzing major concepts in developmental biology from quantitative, physics-based and molecular perspectives.

Prerequisite: CSB328H1/ CSB340H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB490H1 - Team-Based Learning: Current Topics in Cell and Molecular Biology

Hours: 8L/16S

A team-based learning course with emphasis on questions in the fields of protein biochemistry, synthetic biology, and the evolution of proteins and networks of protein-protein interactions. Lectures and seminars will focus on current research topics within these fields and will provide the background knowledge for students to work in teams to explore the primary research literature, and for each team to develop a formal research proposal. For details on this year's content, please go to the Undergraduate course section of the CSB website, http://csb.utoronto.ca.

Prerequisite: BIO260H1/ HMB265H1, CSB330H1/ CSB349H1/ CSB352H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB491H1 - Team-Based Research: Research in Cell and Molecular Biology

Hours: 60P

CSB491H1 is a plant molecular biology lab that builds on molecular biology and biochemistry skills acquired in CSB350H1 or CSB330H1. After an initial training lab section, students will work in teams to develop a research project which they will conduct in the second half of the course. They will develop laboratory and teamwork skills that are desirable for them to function in a research laboratory and in the workplace. The course will integrate current molecular biology techniques, including designing and characterizing mutants made with CRISPR/Cas9. (Lab Materials Fee: $52). Lab coat and safety glasses are required for use in laboratories; students are responsible for purchasing these items (approximate cost is $26).

Prerequisite: CSB330H1/ CSB350H1 with a minimum grade of 77% and approval of the instructor
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB492H1 - Advanced Topics in Cell and Systems Biology

Hours: 24L

This advanced course covers topics in cell and systems biology at all levels of biological organization.  Students learn about the wide array of state-of-the-art molecular, genomic, proteomic, cell biological, imaging, physiological and computational tools and methods that researchers use to study the behaviour of cells.

Prerequisite: CSB325H1/ CSB349H1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB497H1 - Independent Research in Cell and Systems Biology I

An original research project (a literature review alone is not sufficient) requiring the prior consent of a member of the Department to supervise the project. The topic is to be mutually agreed upon by the student and supervisor. They must arrange the time, place, and provision of any materials and submit to the Undergraduate Office a signed form of agreement outlining details prior to being enrolled. In the Fall or Winter sessions, a commitment of 8-10 hours per week is expected for research and related course activities. If spread over both the Fall and Winter sessions, a commitment of 4-5 hours per week is expected. In the Summer Session, the number of hours doubles per week (e.g., 16-20 for F or S, or 8-10 for Y) as the length of the term is halved compared to the Fall or Winter term. Many students spend more than this amount of time as they become immersed in their project. This course is normally open only to fourth year students with adequate background in Cell and Systems Biology. Course requirements include a final report, and either an oral presentation (Summer and Fall sessions) or a poster presentation (Winter session). Two workshops on scientific research are scheduled and highly recommended. Details for enrollment are available at the Undergraduate course section of the CSB website, http://csb.utoronto.ca. Maximum of 2.0 credits allowed among CSB497H1, CSB498Y1 and CSB499Y1. (Lab Materials Fee: approximately $26). Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB498Y1 - Independent Research in Cell and Systems Biology I

An original research project (a literature review alone is not sufficient) requiring the prior consent of a member of the Department to supervise the project. The topic is to be mutually agreed upon by the student and supervisor. They must arrange the time, place, and provision of any materials and submit to the Undergraduate Office a signed form of agreement outlining details prior to being enrolled. In the Fall/Winter session, a commitment of 8-10 hours per week is expected for research and related course activities. In the Summer session, the number of hours doubles (16-20 per week) as the length of the term is halved. This course is normally open only to fourth year students with adequate background in Cell and Systems Biology. Course requirements include a final report and either an oral presentation (Summer session) or a poster presentation (Fall/Winter session). Four workshops on scientific research are scheduled and highly recommended. Details for enrollment are available at the Undergraduate course section of the CSB website, http://csb.utoronto.ca. Maximum of 2.0 credits allowed among CSB497H1, CSB498Y1 and CSB499Y1. (Lab Materials Fee: $52). Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB499Y1 - Independent Research in Cell and Systems Biology II

Allows students to do a second independent project. Operates in the same manner as CSB497H1/ CSB498Y1. Maximum of 2.0 credits allowed among CSB497H1, CSB498Y1 and CSB499Y1.  Students who have completed both CSB497H1 and CSB498Y1 are excluded from taking CSB499Y1. (Lab Materials Fee: $52). Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: CSB497H1/ CSB498Y1
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

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