History


Faculty List

Professors Emeriti 
S. Aster, MA, PhD, FRHS
C.C. Berger, MA, PhD, FRSC
P. Blanchard, BA, PhD
R. Bothwell, MA, PhD, FRSC (T)
W.J. Callahan, MA, PhD, FRHS
W. Dowler, MA, PhD
H.L. Dyck, MA, PhD
M. Eksteins, B Phil, D Phil
J.M. Estes, MA, PhD
M.G. Finlayson, MA, PhD
D. Gabaccia, MA, PhD (University of Toronto Scarborough)
W.A. Goffart, AM, PhD, FRHS, FRSC
A. Greer, MA, PhD
P.F. Grendler, MA, PhD
F. Iacovetta, MA, PhD (University of Toronto Scarborough)
J.N. Ingham, MA, PhD
M. Israel, MA, PhD
R.E. Johnson, BA, PhD
J. Kivimae, BA, PhD
M.A. Klein, MA, PhD
T. Lahusen, MA, PhD
T.O. Lloyd, MA, D Phil
L.S. MacDowell, MSc (Econ), PhD
A.C. Murray, MA, PhD
J. Pearl, PhD
D.J. Penslar, MA, C Phil, PhD, FRSC
R.W. Pruessen, MA, PhD
D.L. Raby, BA, PhD
I. Radforth, MA, PhD
I. Robertson, MA, PhD
A. Rossos, MA, PhD
P.F.W. Rutherford, MA, PhD
D. Smyth, BA, PhD, FRHS (T)
S. Van Kirk, MA, PhD
L. Viola, MA, PhD, FRSC
N.K. Wagle, MA, PhD
M. Wayne, MA, PhD

Associate Professors Emeriti 
L.J. Abray, MA, MPhil, PhD
A.D. Hood, MA, PhD
J. Noel, MA, PhD (University of Toronto Mississauga)
A.I. Silver, PhD
B. Todd, MA, D Phil
W. Wark, MA, PhD

Professor and Chair of the Department 
A. Smith, MA, PhD

Associate Professor and Associate Chair (Graduate Studies)
M. J. Newton, BA, D Phil

Associate Professor and Associate Chair (Undergraduate Studies)
H. Bohaker, MA, PhD

Professor and Deputy Chair
TBA

University Professor
J. Retallack, BA, D Phil, FRSC

Professors
D. Anastakis, MA, PhD
K.R. Bartlett, MA, PhD (V)
D. Bender, MA, PhD (University of Toronto Scarborough)
D. Bergen, MA, PhD
E. Brown, MA, M Phil, PhD (University of Toronto Mississauga)
A. Emon, J.S.D., PhD
N. Everett, PhD
T. Fujitani, MA, PhD
M. Gervers, MA, PhD (University of Toronto Scarborough)
R. Halpern, MA, PhD
J. Hanssen, D Phil (University of Toronto Mississauga)
E.T. Jennings, MA, PhD
A. Kasekamp, MA, PhD
C. Keil, MA, PhD (I)
P.R. Magocsi, MA, PhD, FRSC
M.G. McGowan, MA, PhD (SM)
M.D. Meyerson, MA, PhD
S. Mills, MA, PhD
J. Mori, BA, D Phil
M. Murphy, BA, PhD
S. Penfold, MA, PhD
J. Pilcher, MA, PhD (University of Toronto Scarborough)
N. Rothman, MA, PhD (University of Toronto Scarborough)
E.L. Shorter, MA, PhD, FRSC
G. Silano, MA, PhD (SM)
A. Smith, MA, PhD
M. Tavakoli-Targhi, MA, PhD (University of Toronto Mississauga)
N. Terpstra, MA, PhD, FRSC
A. Verskin, BA, MA, PhD
D.A. Wilson, MA, PhD, FRHS (SM), FRSC
P. Wrobel, MA, PhD

Associate Professors
R. Birla, M Phil, PhD
L. Bertram, MA PhD
H. Bohaker, MA, PhD
L. Chen, MA, JD, PhD (University of Toronto Scarborough)
C. Chin, MA, PhD
I. Cochelin, MA, PhD
P. Cohen, PhD
K. Coleman, PhD (University of Toronto Mississauga)
B. Gettler, MA, PhD (University of Toronto Mississauga)
P. Hastings, MA, PhD (University of Toronto Scarborough)
S. Hawkins, MA, PhD
S. Hill, MA, PhD
J. Jenkins, MA, PhD
M. Kasturi, MA, M Phil, PhD (University of Toronto Mississauga)
R. Kazal, MA, PhD (University of Toronto Scarborough)
T. Lam, PhD (University of Toronto Mississauga)
L. Loeb, M MST, PhD
J. MacArthur, MA, PhD (University of Toronto Mississauga)
L. Mar, MA, PhD
N. Musisi, MA, PhD (N)
W. Nelson, MA, PhD (University of Toronto Scarborough)
M.J. Newton, BA, D Phil
B. Raman, PhD (University of Toronto Scarborough)
S. Rockel, MA, PhD (University of Toronto Scarborough)
T. Sayle, MA, PhD
J. Sharma, MA, MPhil, PhD (University of Toronto Scarborough)
N. Tran, BA, PhD
L. van Isschot, MA, PhD
S. Virani, MA, PhD (University of Toronto Mississauga)
T. Walker, MA, PhD
Y. Wang, MA, PhD
R. Wittmann, MA, PhD (University of Toronto Mississauga)
R. Woods, MA, PhD

Assistant Professors
S. Aidid, BA, MA, PhD
F. Aladejebi, BA, MA, PhD
E. Elhalaby, BA, PhD (University of Toronto Scarborough)
C. Ewing, MA, PhD
A. Grewal, MA, PhD (University of Toronto Scarborough)
W.C. Johnson, MA, PhD
M. Mishler, MA, PhD
A. Nair, BA, MA, PhD (University of Toronto Scarborough)
S. Sweeney, MA, PhD
L. Topouzova, BA, MA, PhD (University of Toronto Mississauga)

Introduction

History is an active, future-shaping discipline and a contested area in politics. Historians study the past to understand it on its own terms, to gain insight into how our world has developed, and in order to influence the present. Authoritarian regimes aim to control the work that historians do - why is that? Why is knowledge of the past so feared by those who seek to have power over the lives of others? What can the experience of the past teach us about the challenges humanity faces now?

History students gain both a broad overview of the contours of history and in-depth knowledge of one or more specific regions, time periods, or thematic specializations. They come to understand how social processes, political ideologies, economic trends, and environmental changes have intersected with individual and collective human actions to shape historical change and, ultimately, the world we live in today. Our diverse, award-winning faculty teach students the skills and methods of historical research, how to make rigorous arguments, and how to speak and write effectively. History students learn how history is written, including the use and interpretation of evidence, and the choices involved in various theoretical and analytical frameworks.

We offer Specialist, Major and Minor Programs of Study, as well as a Focus in Law and History for Majors and Specialists which introduces students to the study of legal history and is an excellent foundation for law school.  Majors and Specialists can also apply for the Arts & Science Internship Program in History (ASIP). History graduates put their training directly to use in such fields as law, politics, public policy, business, government, education, the GLAM sector (galleries, libraries, archives and museums), filmmaking, journalism, international relations, urban planning, content creation and many others.

Curriculum

The History curriculum is designed to allow you a great deal of flexibility to follow your own interests. However, breadth requirements (described in program requirements below) ensure that you acquire an understanding of the more distant as well as more recent past, and that you study the histories of different peoples around the globe.

The 100-level courses are thematically-based and introduce students to the craft and tools of historical research and writing. The 200-level courses are broad chronological surveys of countries, regions, or time periods. They are open to first-year students and have no prerequisites. The 300-level courses enable students to pursue topics in greater depth and methodological sophistication. They are not open to first-year students and frequently have prerequisites or recommended preparation that will prepare you to be successful. The 400-level courses represent the culmination of an undergraduate’s study of history. They are taught by faculty as small-group seminars in which students draw upon the skills they have developed through the course of their History program in research, analysis, and oral and written presentation.

Arts & Science Internship Program (ASIP)

The new Arts & Science Internship Program (ASIP) stream is available to students who are entering Year 2 or Year 3 of study and are enrolled in the History Specialist and History Major. Enrolment is limited and requires a supplemental application. Students enrolled in the ASIP stream will be required to complete mandatory Professional Development programming plus a minimum of 12 and a maximum of 20 months (Year-2 entry) or a minimum of 12 and a maximum of 16 months (Year-3 entry) of paid, full-time work experience. The time to degree completion for students enrolled in ASIP will normally be 5 years. There is an additional cost to participate in the ASIP stream. Students will typically be admitted to the ASIP stream for the Fall term of Year 2 of study, however, in exceptional circumstances students, including transfer students, who enrolled in an eligible program in the Summer after Year 2 can be admitted to the ASIP stream for the Fall of Year 3. Acceptance into an ASIP stream in Year 3 is dependent on space and requires approval of the student’s academic unit and the Faculty of Arts & Science Experiential Learning & Outreach Support (ELOS) Office. Please refer to the ASIP eligibility page for further details. Please note Year 3 entry will not be available until Fall 2024.

Website: www.history.utoronto.ca

Associate Chair (Undergraduate): Associate Professor Heidi Bohaker. Email: history.ugchair@utoronto.ca

Undergraduate Administrator and Student Advisor: Vicki Norton, Room 2074, Sidney Smith Hall. Email: history.ugadvisor@utoronto.ca

Follow us on social media - Instagram: @history_uoft, Twitter: @History_UofT.

Our vibrant History Students' Association has a mentorship program for new students, publishes a journal and runs a conference for undergraduates, as well as hosting engaging social activities throughout the year. The HSA also participates in departmental governance. Follow them on Instagram to learn more: @uofthsa.

History Programs

History Specialist (Arts Program) - ASSPE0652

Enrolment Requirements:

This is a limited enrolment program. Students must have completed 4.0 credits and meet the requirements listed below to enrol.

Variable Minimum Grade
A minimum grade is needed for entry, and this minimum changes each year depending on available spaces and the number of applicants. The following courses must be completed:

2.0 HIS credits to be made up in one of the following ways:

Option 1:

Option 2:

To ensure that students admitted to the program will be successful, applicants with a final grade lower than 70% in each course will not be considered for admission. Please note that obtaining this minimum final grade does not guarantee admission to the program.

Students in this program have the option to request enrolment in the Arts & Science Internship Program (ASIP) stream. Students can apply for the ASIP stream after Year 1 (Year 2 entry) or after Year 2 (Year 3 entry, starting Fall 2024). Full details about ASIP, including student eligibility, selection and enrolment, are available in the ASIP section of the Arts & Science Academic Calendar. Please note that the majority of students enter ASIP in Fall term of Year 2. Space is more limited for Year 3 entry. Students applying for Year 3 entry must have been admitted to the History Specialist in the Summer after Year 2.

Completion Requirements:

The Specialist program gives students in-depth training in historical research, analysis, and writing for future professional use or graduate study. To tailor the program to your needs, in your third year you have a choice between two pathways: a higher level course-work option in order to further the development of excellent skills via a wider variety of courses or a thesis option where you will be able to do the same while also concentrating on a specific research topic.

A total of 10.0 credits, meeting the following requirements:

Only 1.0 credit at the 100-level can be used to fulfill program requirements.

Higher Years: Additional HIS courses to a total of 10.0 credits overall, meeting the following requirements:

1. Geographic Distribution (200+ level):

a) 2.0 credits in Africa/Asia/Middle East with at least one 0.5 credit in 2 of the 3 areas. This requirement cannot be met by more than 1.0 credit from any area.
b) 1.0 credit in Canada/US/Latin America/The Caribbean
c) 1.0 credit in Europe

2. Temporal Requirement: 1.0 credit in Pre-1800 history course(s) listed below.

Note 2: HIS courses listed with (.50) indicate that they fulfill half of the Temporal Requirement.

3. Levels: At least 5.0 credits at the 300+ level, including 1.5 credits at the 400-level to be fulfilled in one of the following ways:

Pathways:

a) Thesis Option: HIS475H1 and HIS476H1 taken in that order, OR HIS491Y1 (see Note 3)

b) Coursework option: 1.0 credit of Senior (300 or 400-level) Methodology course(s), listed below

Note 3: Students interested in the Thesis Option should contact the Undergraduate Chair for advice about the pathway, thesis topics, and the selection of an appropriate faculty advisor.

Courses in other departments:

a) Students may take up to 1.0 credit from the Equivalent Courses list below. These courses may not be used to fulfill the 100-level, Geographic, or Temporal requirements.

Geographic Area a): Africa, Asia, Middle East

(Sub-group: Africa)

HIS295Y1, HIS297Y1, HIS307H1, HIS319H1, HIS322H1, HIS342H1, HIS352H1, HIS383Y1, HIS392Y1, HIS394H1, HIS450H1, HIS481H1, HIS483H1, HIS486H1

(Sub-group: Asia)

HIS280Y1, HIS282Y1, HIS283Y1, HIS285H1, HIS307H1, HIS315H1, HIS316H1, HIS322H1, HIS326H1, HIS328H1, HIS333H1, HIS346H1, HIS379H1, HIS382H1, JHA384H1, HIS385H1, HIS385Y0, JHA394H1, HIS400H1, HIS467H1, HIS470H1, HIS473H1, HIS480H1, HIS485H1, HIS494H1

(Sub-group: Middle East)

HIS208Y1, HIS304H1, HIS307H1, JHM307H1, HIS339H1, HIS370H1, JMH385H1

Geographic Area b): Canada/The United States/Latin America/The Caribbean

(Sub-group: Canada)

HIS264H1, HIS265Y1, HIS266H1, HIS267H1, HIS300H1, HIS310H1, HIS311Y1, HIS312H1, HIS314H1, HIS318H1, HIS335H1, HIS356H1, HIS358H1, HIS360H1, HIS363H1, HIS365H1, JIH366H1, HIS366H1, HIS369H1, JIH369H1, HIS371H1, HIS402H1, HIS405Y1, HIS410H1, HIS417H1, HIS418H1, HIS419H1, HIS429H1, HIS435H1, JIH460H1, HIS466H1, HIS468H1, HIS469H1, HIS472H1, HIS484H1, HIS492H1

(Sub-group: The United States)

HIS202H1, HIS221H1, HIS222H1, HIS271Y1, HIS300H1, HIS310H1, HIS335H1, HIS362H1, HIS365H1, HIS366H1, JIH366H1, HIS369H1, JIH369H1, HIS372H1, HIS376H1, HIS377H1, HIS378H1, HIS396H1, HIS401H1, HIS401Y1, HIS404H1, HIS411H1, JIH460H1, HIS463H1, HIS465H1, HIS473H1, HIS479H1, HIS484H1

(Sub-group: Latin America/The Caribbean)

HIS230H1, HIS231H1, HIS291H1, HIS292H1, JHN323H1, HIS359H1, HIS390H1, HIS397H1, HIS413H1, HIS446H1, HIS474H1

Geographic Area c): Europe

(Sub-group: Britain)

HIS302H1, HIS332H1, HIS324H1, HIS337H1, HIS347H1, HIS349H1, HIS368H1, HIS381H1, HIS422H1, HIS477H1, HIS482H1

(Sub-group: Western Europe)

HIS202H1, HIS208Y1, HIS220Y1, HIS240H1, HIS241H1, HIS242H1, HIS243H1, HIS244H1, HIS245H1, HIS303H1, HIS308H1, HIS309H1, HIS317H1, HIS320H1, HIS321H1, HIS322H1, HIS323H1, HIS327H1, HIS329H1, HIS330H1, HIS334H1, HIS336H1, HIS338H1, HIS341Y1, HIS343H1, HIS345H1, HIS350H1, HIS354H1, HIS355H1, HIS357Y0, HIS357Y1, HIS361H1, HIS373H1, HIS375H1, HIS381H1, HIS386H1, HIS387H1, HIS388H1, HIS403H1, HIS407H1, HIS409H1, HIS411H1, HIS414H1, HIS415Y1, HIS416H1, HIS423H1, HIS424H1, HIS425H1, HIS426H1, HIS427H1, HIS428H1, HIS430H1, HIS432H1, HIS437H1, HIS438H1, HIS440H1, HIS443H1, HIS444H1, HIS445H1, HIS446H1, HIS457H1, HIS464H1, HIS467H1, HIS480H1, HIS489H1, HIS493H1

(Sub-group: Eastern Europe and Russia)

HIS200H1, HIS240H1, HIS250Y1, HIS251Y1, JSH300H1, JHP304Y1, HIS306H1, HIS325H1, HIS331H1, HIS335H1, HIS340H1, HIS350H1, HIS351H1, HIS351Y1, HIS353Y1, HIS362H1, HIS364H1, HIS367Y0, HIS381H1, HIS384H1, HIS386H1, HIS401H1, HIS420H1, HIS433H1, HIS434Y1, HIS436H1, HIS439H1, HIS442H1, HIS449Y1, HIS451H1, JHP451Y1, JHP454Y1, HIS459H1, HIS460H1, HIS461H1, HIS490H1

Temporal Requirement

HIS100Y1 (.50), HIS101Y1 (.50), HIS102Y1 (.50), HIS103Y1 (.50), HIS106Y1, HIS107Y1 (.50), HIS108Y1 (.50), HIS109Y1 (.50), HIS110Y1 (.50), HIS208Y1 (.50), HIS220Y1, HIS230H1, HIS243H1, HIS244H1, HIS250Y1 (.50), HIS251Y1 (.50), HIS271Y1 (.50), HIS280Y1 (.50), HIS283Y (.50), HIS291H1, HIS293H1, HIS295Y1 (.50), HIS297Y1 (.50), HIS303H1, HIS308H1, HIS309H1, HIS320H1, HIS321H1, HIS322H1, HIS323H1, HIS329H1, HIS333H1, HIS336H1, HIS337H1, HIS353Y1 (.50), HIS355H1, HIS357Y1, HIS357Y0, HIS362H1, HIS368H1, JIH369H1, HIS373H1, HIS375H1, HIS381H1, HIS383Y1 (.50), HIS403H1, HIS414H1, HIS422H1, HIS424H1, HIS426H1, HIS427H1, HIS428H1, HIS432H1, HIS434Y1, HIS443H1, HIS457H1, HIS492H1

Methodology Courses

HIS335H1, HIS345H1, HIS346H1, HIS351H1, HIS351Y1, HIS358H1, HIS383Y1, HIS389H1*, HIS392Y1, HIS393H1, HIS406H1, HIS419H1, HIS422H1, HIS423H1, HIS435H1, HIS436H1, HIS440H1, HIS446H1, HIS455Y1, HIS460H1, JIH460H1, HIS465H1, HIS466H1**, HIS467H1, HIS468H1, HIS470H1, HIS480H1, HIS490H1, HIS496H1

* “Topics in History”: Various topics each year. Please see the Arts & Science Timetable for current offerings. Course descriptions and prerequisites can be found on the department website.

** “Topics in Canadian History”: Various topics each year. Please see the Arts & Science Timetable for current offerings. Course descriptions and prerequisites can be found on the department website.

Equivalent Courses

CDN230H1, CDN280H1, CDN340H1, CDN390H1, CLT337H1, CLT377H1, CLT378H1, CLT413H1, CLT416H1, CLT444H1, EAS245H1, EAS246H1, EAS247H1, EAS271H1, EAS348H1, EAS364H1, EAS372H1, EAS372Y1, EAS374H1, EAS459Y1, * EAS464H1, EAS473H1, EAS475Y1, EAS484Y1, INS200H1, INS201Y1, INS300Y1, INS352H1, NMC275H1, NMC278H1, NMC355H1, NMC373H1, NMC376H1, NMC377Y1, NMC378H1, NMC475H1, NMC477H1, NMC479H1, REN240Y1, REN348Y0, REN441H1, TRN250Y1, WGS481H1

*course(s) no longer offered

Thematic Streams

Although thematic streams are not an official program requirement, you may find it enriching to follow a particular theme across different time periods or geographical divisions.

Colonialism, Post-Colonialism, Trans-Nationalism

HIS106Y1, HIS202H1, HIS208Y1, HIS280Y1, HIS282Y1, HIS283Y1, HIS291H1, HIS292H1, HIS303H1, HIS312H1, HIS314H1, HIS326H1, HIS353Y1, HIS369H1, HIS380H1, HIS416H1, HIS445H1, HIS446H1, HIS467H1, HIS470H1, HIS480H1, NMC278H1, NMC376H1, NMC377Y1,

Indigenous History

HIS101Y1, HIS102Y1, HIS230H1, HIS264H1, HIS291H1, HIS292H1, HIS359H1, HIS366H1, HIS369H1, HIS389H1, HIS419H1, INS200H1, INS201Y1, INS300Y1, INS352H1

International Relations

HIS103Y1, HIS311Y1, HIS343H1, HIS344H1, HIS401Y1, HIS401H1, HIS405Y1, HIS451H1, HIS465Y1

Medieval

HIS220Y1, HIS303H1, HIS320H1, HIS321H1, HIS322H1, HIS323H1, HIS336H1, HIS362H1, HIS403H1, HIS424H1, HIS427H1, HIS428H1, HIS432H1, HIS438H1, NMC376H1

Women and Gender

HIS202H1, HIS297Y1, HIS302H1, HIS323H1, HIS348H1, HIS354H1, HIS363H1, HIS383H1, HIS406H1, HIS416H1, HIS446H1, HIS448H1, HIS465Y1, HIS481H1

Students in this program have the option to complete the Arts & Science Internship Program (ASIP) stream.

Note: Effective Fall 2021, courses associated with St. Michael's College's Celtic Studies program will have the new "CLT" designator. In addition, courses associated with Victoria College's Renaissance Studies program will have the new "REN" designator.

Note: HIS262H1, Canada: A Short Story of Here, is designed for non-History students, this introductory survey fulfills the Society and Its Institutions breadth requirement. It cannot be counted towards a History program, program requirements or as a pre-requisite for upper-level History courses.

Focus in Law and History (Specialist) - ASFOC0652A

The Focus in Law and History gives students the critical skill-set to interrogate the ‘force of law’, not only in the sense of law as enforced, but also as a vehicle of cultural, social, and economic knowledge. Importantly, it will ask students to interrogate assumptions of what counts as law across time and space. At the core of this Focus to the Major are fundamental questions of both law and society: Who has law? What does (or should) it look like? Who decides? What sorts of critical histories can be written from and about legal archives that span time, space, and language tradition?

Enrolment Requirements:

Enrolment in the History Specialist is required.

Completion Requirements:

3.0 credits

  1. Methodological Training Requirement: HIS268H1: Law and History.
  2. Law and History Focus Enrichment: 2.5 credits from the following list, including at least 1.0 credit at the 300+ level.

    HIS101Y1, HIS230H1, HIS231H1, HIS282Y1, HIS283Y1, HIS303H1, HIS307H1, HIS308H1, HIS332H1, HIS335H1, HIS357Y1, HIS375H1, HIS379H1, HIS390H1, HIS391Y1, HIS397H1, HIS419H1, HIS424H1, HIS438H1, HIS443H1, HIS470H1, HIS493H1, JHN323H1

    Some offerings of HIS389H1, HIS466H1 and HIS496H1 may also count towards this focus. Check with the department for current offerings.

Up to a 0.5 credit from non-HIS courses may be substituted for requirement 2, with permission of the department. Substitutions will be reviewed based on a copy of the course syllabus.

History Major (Arts Program) - ASMAJ0652

Enrolment Requirements:

This is a limited enrolment program. Students must have completed 4.0 credits and meet the requirements listed below to enrol.

Completed courses
The following courses are required:

HIS credits to be made up in one of the following ways:

Students in this program have the option to request enrolment in the Arts & Science Internship Program (ASIP) stream. Students can apply for the ASIP stream after Year 1 (Year 2 entry) or after Year 2 (Year 3 entry, starting Fall 2024). Full details about ASIP, including student eligibility, selection and enrolment, are available in the ASIP section of the Arts & Science Academic Calendar. Please note that the majority of students enter ASIP in Fall term of Year 2. Space is more limited for Year 3 entry. Students applying for Year 3 entry must have been admitted to the History Major in the Summer after Year 2.

Completion Requirements:

A total of 7.0 credits, meeting the following requirements:

Only 1.0 credit at the 100-level can be used to fulfill program requirements.

Higher Years: Additional HIS courses to a total of 7.0 credits, meeting the following requirements:

1. Geographic Distribution (200+ level):

a) 2.0 credits Africa/Asia/Middle East with at least a 0.5 credit in 2 of the 3 areas. This requirement cannot be met by more than 1.0 credit from any area.

b) 1.0 credit Canada/US/Latin America/The Caribbean

c) 1.0 credit Europe

2. Temporal Requirement: 1.0 credit in Pre-1800 history course(s) listed below.

Note 1: The HIS courses listed with (.50) indicate that they fulfill half of the Temporal Requirement.

3. At least 2.0 credits at the 300+ level, including one 0.5 credit at the 400-level.

Courses in other departments:

a) Students may take up to 1.0 credit from the Equivalent Courses list below. These courses may not be used to fulfill the 100-level, Geographic, or Temporal requirements.

Geographic Area a): Africa, Asia, Middle East

(Sub-group: Africa)

HIS295Y1, HIS297Y1, HIS307H1, HIS319H1, HIS322H1, HIS342H1, HIS352H1, HIS383Y1, HIS392Y1, HIS394H1, HIS413H1, HIS446H1, HIS450H1, HIS464H1, HIS481H1, HIS483H1, HIS486H1

(Sub-group: Asia)

HIS280Y1, HIS282Y1, HIS283Y1, HIS285H1, HIS307H1, HIS315H1, HIS316H1, HIS326H1, HIS328H1, HIS333H1, HIS346H1, HIS379H1, HIS382H1, JHA384H1, HIS385H1, HIS385Y0, JHA394H1, HIS400H1, HIS464H1, HIS467H1, HIS470H1, HIS473H1, HIS480H1, HIS485H1, HIS494H1

(Sub-group: Middle East)

HIS208Y1, HIS268H1, HIS304H1, HIS307H1, HIS339H1, HIS370H1, JHM307H1, JMH385H1

Geographic Area b): Canada/The United States/Latin America/The Caribbean

(Sub-group: Canada)

HIS264H1, HIS265Y1, HIS266H1, HIS267H1, HIS300H1, HIS310H1, HIS311Y1, HIS312H1, HIS314H1, HIS318H1, HIS335H1, HIS356H1, HIS358H1, HIS360H1, HIS363H1, HIS365H1, HIS366H1, JIH366H1, HIS369H1, JIH369H1, HIS371H1, HIS402H1, HIS405Y1, HIS410H1, HIS417H1, HIS418H1, HIS419H1, HIS429H1, HIS435H1, JIH460H1, HIS466H1, HIS468H1, HIS469H1, HIS472H1, HIS484H1

(Sub-group: The United States)

HIS202H1, HIS221H1, HIS222H1, HIS271Y1, HIS300H1, HIS310H1, HIS362H1, HIS365H1, HIS366H1, JIH366H1, HIS369H1, JIH369H1, HIS372H1, HIS376H1, HIS377H1, HIS378H1, HIS396H1, HIS401H1, HIS401Y1, HIS404H1, HIS411H1, JIH460H1, HIS463H1, HIS465H1, HIS473H1, HIS479H1, HIS484H1

(Sub-group: Latin America/The Caribbean)

HIS230H1, HIS231H1, HIS291H1, HIS292H1, JHN323H1, HIS359H1, HIS390H1, HIS397H1, HIS474H1

Geographic Area c): Europe

(Sub-group: Britain)

HIS302H1, HIS324H1, HIS332H1, HIS337H1, HIS347H1, HIS349H1, HIS350H1, HIS368H1, HIS381H1, HIS422H1, HIS477H1, HIS482H1

(Sub-group: Western Europe)

HIS202H1, HIS208Y1, HIS220Y1, HIS240H1, HIS241H1, HIS242H1, HIS243H1, HIS244H1, HIS245H1, HIS303H1, HIS308H1, HIS309H1, HIS317H1, HIS320H1, HIS321H1, HIS322H1, HIS323H1, HIS327H1, HIS329H1, HIS330H1, HIS334H1, HIS336H1, HIS338H1, HIS341Y1, HIS343H1, HIS345H1, HIS350H1, HIS354H1, HIS355H1, HIS357Y0, HIS357Y1, HIS361H1, HIS373H1, HIS375H1, HIS381H1, HIS386H1, HIS387H1, HIS388H1, HIS403H1, HIS407H1, HIS411H1, HIS414H1, HIS415Y1, HIS416H1, HIS423H1, HIS424H1, HIS425H1, HIS426H1, HIS427H1, HIS428H1, HIS430H1, HIS432H1, HIS437H1, HIS438H1, HIS440H1, HIS443H1, HIS444H1, HIS445H1, HIS446H1, HIS457H1, HIS467H1, HIS480H1, HIS489H1, HIS493H1

(Sub-group: Eastern Europe and Russia)

HIS200H1, HIS240H1, HIS250Y1, HIS251Y1, JSH300H1, JHP304Y1, HIS306H1, HIS325H1, HIS331H1, HIS335H1, HIS340H1, HIS350H1, HIS351H1, HIS351Y1, HIS353Y1, HIS362H1, HIS364H1, HIS367Y0, HIS381H1, HIS384H1, HIS386H1, HIS401H1, HIS420H1, HIS433H1, HIS434Y1, HIS436H1, HIS439H1, HIS442H1, HIS449Y1, HIS451H1, JHP451Y1, JHP454Y1, HIS459H1, HIS460H1, HIS461H1, HIS490H1

Temporal Requirement

HIS100Y1 (.50), HIS101Y1 (.50), HIS102Y1 (.50), HIS103Y1 (.50), HIS106Y1, HIS107Y1 (.50), HIS108Y1 (.50), HIS109Y1 (.50), HIS110Y1 (.50), HIS208Y1 (.50), HIS220Y1, HIS230H1, HIS243H1, HIS244H1, HIS250Y1 (.50), HIS251Y1 (.50), HIS271Y1 (.50), HIS280Y1 (.50), HIS283Y (.50), HIS291H1, HIS293H1, HIS295Y1 (.50), HIS297Y1 (.50), HIS303H1, HIS308H1, HIS309H1, HIS320H1, HIS321H1, HIS322H1, HIS323H1, HIS329H1, HIS333H1, HIS336H1, HIS337H1, HIS353Y1 (.50), HIS355H1, HIS357Y1, HIS357Y0, HIS362H1, HIS368H1, JIH369H1, HIS373H1, HIS375H1, HIS381H1, HIS383Y1 (.50), HIS403H1, HIS414H1, HIS422H1, HIS424H1, HIS426H1, HIS427H1, HIS428H1, HIS432H1, HIS434Y1, HIS443H1, HIS457H1, HIS492H1

Equivalent Courses

CDN230H1, CDN280H1, CDN340H1, CDN390H1, CLT337H1, CLT377H1, CLT378H1, CLT413H1, CLT416H1, CLT444H1, EAS245H1, EAS246H1, EAS247H1, EAS271H1, EAS348H1, EAS364H1, EAS372H1, EAS372Y1, EAS374H1, EAS459Y1, * EAS464H1, EAS473H1, EAS475Y1, EAS484Y1, INS200H1, INS201Y1, INS300Y1, INS352H1, NMC275H1, NMC278H1, NMC355H1, NMC373H1, NMC376H1, NMC377Y1, NMC378H1, NMC475H1, NMC477H1, NMC479H1, REN240Y1, REN348Y0, REN441H1, TRN250Y1, WGS481H1

*course(s) no longer offered

Thematic Streams

Although thematic streams are not an official program requirement, you may find it enriching to follow a particular theme across different time periods or geographical divisions.

Colonialism, Post-Colonialism, Trans-Nationalism

CLT416H1, HIS106Y1, HIS202H1, HIS208Y1, HIS280Y1, HIS282Y1, HIS283Y1, HIS291H1, HIS292H1, HIS303H1, HIS312H1, HIS314H1, HIS326H1, HIS353Y1, HIS369H1, HIS380H1, HIS416H1, HIS445H1, HIS446H1, HIS467H1, HIS470H1, HIS480H1, NMC278H1, NMC376H1, NMC377Y1

Indigenous History

HIS101Y1, HIS102Y1, HIS230H1, HIS264H1, HIS291H1, HIS292H1, HIS359H1, HIS366H1, HIS369H1, HIS389H1, HIS419H1, INS200H1, INS201Y1, INS300Y1, INS352H1

International Relations

HIS103Y1, HIS311Y1, HIS343H1, HIS344H1, HIS401Y1, HIS401H1, HIS405Y1, HIS451H1, HIS465Y1

Medieval

HIS220Y1, HIS303H1, HIS320H1, HIS321H1, HIS322H1, HIS323H1, HIS336H1, HIS362H1, HIS403H1, HIS424H1, HIS427H1, HIS428H1, HIS432H1, HIS438H1, NMC376H1

Women and Gender

HIS202H1, HIS297Y1, HIS302H1, HIS323H1, HIS348H1, HIS354H1, HIS363H1, HIS383H1, HIS406H1, HIS416H1, HIS446H1, HIS448H1, HIS465Y1, HIS481H1

Students in this program have the option to complete the Arts & Science Internship Program (ASIP) stream.

Note 2: HIS262H1, Canada: A Short Story of Here, is designed for non-History students, this introductory survey fulfills the "Society and Its Institutions" breadth requirement. It cannot be counted towards a History program, program requirements or as a pre-requisite for upper-level History courses.

Note: Effective Fall 2021, courses associated with St. Michael's College's Celtic Studies program will have the new "CLT" designator. In addition, courses associated with Victoria College's Renaissance Studies program will have the new "REN" designator.

Focus in Law and History (Major) - ASFOC0652B

The Focus in Law and History gives students the critical skill-set to interrogate the ‘force of law’, not only in the sense of law as enforced, but also as a vehicle of cultural, social, and economic knowledge. Importantly, it will ask students to interrogate assumptions of what counts as law across time and space. At the core of this Focus to the Major are fundamental questions of both law and society: Who has law? What does (or should) it look like? Who decides? What sorts of critical histories can be written from and about legal archives that span time, space, and language tradition?

Enrolment Requirements:

Enrolment in the History Major is required.

Completion Requirements:

3.0 credits

  1. Methodological Training Requirement: HIS268H1: Law and History.
  2. Law and History Focus Enrichment: 2.5 credits from the following list, including at least 1.0 credit at the 300+ level.

    HIS101Y1, HIS230H1, HIS231H1, HIS282Y1, HIS283Y1, HIS303H1, HIS307H1, HIS308H1, HIS332H1, HIS335H1, HIS357Y1, HIS375H1, HIS379H1, HIS390H1, HIS391Y1, HIS397H1, HIS419H1, HIS424H1, HIS438H1, HIS443H1, HIS470H1, HIS493H1, JHN323H1

    Some offerings of HIS389H1, HIS466H1 and HIS496H1 may also count towards this focus. Check with the department for current offerings.

Up to a 0.5 credit from non-HIS courses may be substituted for requirement 2, with permission of the department. Substitutions will be reviewed based on a copy of the course syllabus.

History Minor (Arts Program) - ASMIN0652

Enrolment Requirements:

This is an open enrolment program. A student who has completed 4.0 credits may enrol in the program.

Completion Requirements:

The minor program provides a useful grounding for students interested in the study of the past and contributes to their development of interdisciplinary perspectives from across the Humanities and Social Sciences.

(4.0 credits, of which only 1.0 credit at the 100-level may be used to fulfill program requirements)

First Year: 1.0 credit at the 100-level is required. It is recommended that students complete this requirement prior to enrolling in the minor program.

Higher Years: Additional HIS courses to a total of 4.0 credits, including at least 1.0 credit at the 300- or 400-level.

Courses in other departments: Students may take up to a 0.5 credit from the Equivalent Courses list below.

Equivalent Courses

CDN230H1, CDN280H1, CDN340H1, CDN390H1, CLT337H1, CLT377H1, CLT378H1, CLT413H1, CLT416H1, CLT444H1, EAS245H1, EAS246H1, EAS247H1, EAS271H1, EAS348H1, EAS364H1, EAS372H1, EAS372Y1, EAS374H1, EAS459Y1, * EAS464H1, EAS473H1, EAS475Y1, EAS484Y1, INS200H1, INS201Y1, INS300Y1, INS352H1, NMC275H1, NMC278H1, NMC355H1, NMC373H1, NMC376H1, NMC377Y1, NMC378H1, NMC475H1, NMC477H1, NMC479H1, REN240Y1, REN348Y0, REN441H1, TRN250Y1, WGS481H1

*course(s) no longer offered

Note: Effective Fall 2021, courses associated with St. Michael's College's Celtic Studies program will have the new "CLT" designator. In addition, courses associated with Victoria College's Renaissance Studies program will have the new "REN" designator.

Note: HIS262H1, Canada: A Short Story of Here, is designed for non-History students, this introductory survey fulfills the Society and Its Institutions breadth requirement. It cannot be counted towards a History program, program requirements or as a pre-requisite for upper-level History courses.


Combined Degree Program (CDP) offered with Victoria College and Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE)

  • Combined Degree Program in HBA/HBSc and Master of Teaching (MT)

Students enrolled in the Minor in Education and Society and Major in History may apply for this Combined Degree Program. For details about application and program requirements, see the Combined Degree Programs section.

Regarding History Courses

Note: Not all of these courses are taught every year. Please check the Arts & Science timetable or the HIS Department website for the list of courses offered in 2023-2024.

First-Year Foundations Seminars

First-Year Foundations Seminars are open only to newly-admitted, Faculty of Arts & Science students (3.5 credits or less). They are 1.0 credit or 0.5 credit courses that focus on discussion of issues, questions and controversies surrounding a particular discipline (or several disciplines) in a small-group setting that encourages the development of critical thinking, writing skills, oral presentation and research methods. FYF seminars are as rigorous and demanding as any other first-year course and require in addition the acquisition of those skills expected of successful undergraduate students. With a maximum enrolment of 30 students each, they are an ideal way to have an enjoyable and challenging small-class experience in your first year. Details can be found at www.artsci.utoronto.ca/future/academic-opportunities/first-year-opportunities/first-year-foundations-seminars.

First-Year Foundations Seminars:

  • Count as 1.0 or 0.5 of the 20 credits required for an Hon BA, Hon BSc or BCom.
  • First-Year Foundations Seminars are not required to get into any Program of Study. However, they may count towards your Program. Please check with your college registrar for further details.
  • Can be counted towards the breadth requirement.

100-Level Courses:

All 100-series HIS courses are mutually exclusive, with the exception of AP, IB, CAPE, or GCE transfer credits. Students may enrol in only one 100-level History course. Students enrolled in more than one of these courses (or who have completed one of these courses or a previous HIS 100-level course with a mark of 50% or greater) will be removed at any time. First-Year students can also enrol in 200-level HIS courses.

History Courses

HIS100Y1 - History of the Arctic

Hours: 48L/20T

People have made the Arctic home for millennia, creating circumpolar cultures in its challenging climate. This course compares and examines connections in the contested polar region through several themes: cultures in contact, trade and exploration, environment, crime and punishment, and defense and sovereignty.

Exclusion: HIS101Y1, HIS102Y1, HIS103Y1, HIS106Y1, HIS107Y1, HIS108Y1, HIS109Y1, HIS110Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4), Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS101Y1 - Histories of Violence

Hours: 48L/20T

Ranging widely chronologically and geographically, this course explores the phenomenon of violence in history. It examines the role and meanings of violence in particular societies (such as ancient Greece and samurai Japan), the ideological foundations and use of violence in the clash of cultures (as in slavery, holy wars, colonization, and genocide), and the effects and memorialization of violence.

Exclusion: HIS100Y1, HIS102Y1, HIS103Y1, HIS106Y1, HIS107Y1, HIS108Y1, HIS109Y1, HIS110Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3), Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HIS102Y1 - Empires, Encounters and Exchanges

Hours: 48L/20T

Interactions among peoples, empires, and cultures, with particular attention to the non-European world. Can we speak of “international relations” before the modern concept of nation-states was established? What forms did globalization take in the pre-modern era? Covering a broad chronological sweep from before the Silk Road to the present day, we will look at exchanges of goods and technologies; dissemination of ideas and religions; voyages of migration and exploration; and episodes of conquest and colonization.

Exclusion: HIS100Y1, HIS101Y1, HIS103Y1, HIS106Y1, HIS107Y1, HIS108Y1, HIS109Y1, HIS110Y1, HISA04H3/ HISA05H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3), Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HIS103Y1 - Strategy and Statecraft: War and Diplomacy in European History

Hours: 48L/20T

An analysis of the development of the international system, from 1648 to 1945, which highlights the role of war as an instrument of national policy, as a determinant of the system of states and as a threat to international society.

Exclusion: HIS100Y1, HIS101Y1, HIS102Y1, HIS106Y1, HIS107Y1, HIS108Y1, HIS109Y1, HIS110Y1
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS106Y1 - The African Diaspora in the Americas, 1492-1804

Hours: 48L/20T

This course introduces the history of the African Diaspora in the Americas, from 1492-1804. Lectures and readings will draw from primary sources and historical scholarship to focus on a range of topics, including slavery and the slave trade, race relations, gender and sexuality, religious and cultural practices, and liberation struggles.

Exclusion: HIS100Y1, HIS101Y1, HIS102Y1, HIS103Y1, HIS107Y1, HIS108Y1, HIS109Y1, HIS110Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS107Y1 - Approaches to East Asian History

Hours: 48L/20T

This course draws on the history of China, Korea and Japan between 1600 to 1950 to explore historical issues of gender, nationalism, war and relations with the West.

Exclusion: HIS100Y1, HIS101Y1, HIS102Y1, HIS103Y1, HIS106Y1, HIS108Y1, HIS109Y1, HIS110Y1, HIS284H5/ EAS204Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS108Y1 - What is History?

Hours: 48L/20T

This course offers an introduction to history as a discipline - to the history of the discipline itself, to the questions, categories, and methodologies that constitute it, and how they have evolved in varied times and places, and to the methodologies students need to acquire to engage in historical inquiry and writing. The course will be part methodological workshop, part epistemological reflection.

Exclusion: HIS100Y1, HIS101Y1, HIS102Y1, HIS103Y1, HIS106Y1, HIS107Y1, HIS109Y1, HIS110Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS109Y1 - The Development of European Civilization, 1350-1945

Hours: 48L/20T

The shape of traditional society; the forces at work on the social, political, economic, cultural and intellectual structures of Western Europe since the high Middle Ages: the Structure of Traditional Society; the First Period of Challenges, 1350-1650; the Second Period of Challenges, 1650-1815; Confidence, Stability and Progress, 1815-1914; the Collapse of the Old Order and the Condition of Modern Europe, 1914-1945.

Exclusion: HIS100Y1, HIS101Y1, HIS102Y1, HIS103Y1, HIS106Y1, HIS107Y1, HIS108Y1, HIS110Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1), Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS110Y1 - History of the Indian Ocean World

Hours: 48L/20T

This course introduces you to the connected and interdependent world people who lived between the present day cities of Dakar, in West Africa, and Jakarta, in Indonesia, from about 1000 to the present. We explore in this class the three "C"s which have linked human experience in Africa and Asia via routes which connected the Indian Ocean World: Connectedness, Contingency, and Cosmopolitanism. We study how people who lived more than a thousand years before our time transported ideas, products, and scripts by land and sea via routes that connected large parts of Africa, Central & South Asia, and East and Southeast Asia, and their histories. The land and sea routes connected these communities and the cosmopolitan outlook of the hosts provided the contingent conditions for a Buddhist monks to travel from all over China to Southern and Southeast Asia; Muslim scholars to travel from West Africa to Indonesia; and merchants and writers to move within these worlds. Human migration, economic trade, and religious conversion had linked the lands and the seas, making it possible for our imams, merchants, monks, and servants to traverse these territories, across the Africa and Asia. This vibrant and wealthy world of African and Asian thinkers, merchants, leaders, and communities became the envy of the world, and as late as the seventeenth century, these crazy rich Africans and Asians dominated the world as it was known. We'll see how history is contingent--and that human migration, economic exploitation, lack of reciprocity, and legacies of European colonial racism have disrupted the cosmopolitan worlds of the Indian Ocean. The world is different today, but more than three quarters of the human population still live in Africa and Asia--see the richness of their worlds as it was for thousands of years, and what will be left for the people of this world as climate change makes the seas rise.

Exclusion: HIS100Y1, HIS101Y1, HIS102Y1, HIS103Y1, HIS106Y1, HIS107Y1, HIS108Y1, HIS109Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS111H1 - History and Social Media

Hours: 24L/10T

In the 21st century, the idea of fake news and its rapid circulation via social media shapes how humans perceive events around them. The issue of what counts as authentic, or “fake,” is not simply a recent phenomenon, but is central to the idea of history itself. What materials get saved, whose stories get told, and why are some stories represented as more important than others? By examining specific examples of “misinformation”–propaganda, suppression of information, and hidden actors-- in a global context, this course explores how historical narrative and public memory have been shaped by the collection and valuation of texts, experiences, and material objects, all themes central to the craft of history.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS112H1 - Ten Events that Changed the World

Hours: 24L/10T

Ever wonder how and why the founding of Islam in 610, the Mongol conquests of Eurasia in the 13th century, the Trans-Atlantic Slave trade, the Haitian Revolution (1791-1804), or the detonation of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki changed the world? This course ten events changed the world and continue to have ramifications today. Experts will give guest lectures on the important “events,” while students will learn how historians work to understand the significance of these moments, human agency, and the idea of an “event,” itself.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS113Y1 - History of Toronto

Hours: 48L/20T

This course introduces students to the basics of historical methods and approaches through a survey of the history of the Toronto. We will stress the way Toronto’s history has been a product of local, regional, national, continental, and global developments. Considerable attention will be paid to building historical methods, including working with primary sources, hands on research, and local history. Possible topics will include colonialism, immigration, urban development, suburban growth, capitalism, politics, environment, and other developments.

Exclusion: HIS100Y1, HIS101Y1, HIS102Y1, HIS106Y1, HIS107Y1, HIS108Y1, HIS109Y1, HIS110Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS190H1 - Freedom Schools

Hours: 24S

This first-year seminar explores radical traditions of education beyond and in resistance to formal schooling. Transnational in scope—and journeying from the late nineteenth century to the present day—we will study the pedagogical innovations and grassroots struggles of anarchic youth, guerrilla intellectuals, and feminist revolutionaries who used education broadly, and historical inquiry in particular, as tools for empowerment and collective liberation. Focusing on primary sources from archives of anticapitalist, antiracist and anticolonial movements, we will investigate traditions of self-teaching and co-learning, genealogies of critical and transformative pedagogies, the construction of decolonial survival and supplementary schools, student mobilizations within and against the university, as well as abolitionist education in our contemporary moment. This course invites participants to interrogate the relationship of education to freedom and justice through collective criticism, self-reflection and creative expression. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS191H1 - Pandemics and Human History

Hours: 24S

We have all just lived through a major historical disruption caused by CoViD-19. In this course, you will be invited to use your experience of the pandemic as a tool for understanding other times, other places, and the study of history itself. We will study plagues and diseases from the ancient world to the Twentieth Century, and introduce methods from social, cultural, and economic history, as well as concepts from the histories of science and medicine.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS192H1 - A History of Queer Asia

Hours: 24S

A first-year seminar on the history of queerness, in all its complexity and diversity, in the no less complex and diverse settings of East, South, and Southeast Asia. Our journey will encompass empires and Indigenous peoples, rulers and rebels, and range from early recorded history down to the twentieth century. Focus will be placed on primary sources and introducing students to the evolving definitions of "queerness" itself. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS193H1 - Calls to Action: The TRC and Residential Schools in Canadian History

Hours: 24S

The last Indian Residential School in Canada closed in 1996. For more than a century and half before that, the Canadian state supported church-run residential schools intended to take Indigenous children away from their families, cultures, languages and traditions. Over 150,000 children passed through the doors of these different schools that operated from coast to coast. Using the formal report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission as a central text, this course explores that history and the ongoing legacy of residential schools in Canada while introducing first year students to historical research methods and sources. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS194H1 - Power, Resistance, and the Graphic Novel

Hours: 24S

This course will look broadly at the question of power and resistance in the Americas (Canada, the United States, and Latin America) through the prism of graphic novels. Each week we will read a graphic novel related to important historical moments or events, drawing on scholarly articles to help us contextualize the novel. We will discuss the medium of graphic novels, their history and place in the broader culture, as well as how they might help or hinder our ability to study and disseminate information about the past. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS195H1 - Remembering and Forgetting

Hours: 24S

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary study of history by exploring processes of remembering and forgetting intrinsic to every society. Topics include the ideas of history and memory, memory cultures and narratives and counternarratives and the study of legal trials, museums, monuments, novels and films as popular vehicles of historical knowledge. The course analyzes in particular how the experiences of war and violence have been both remembered and forgotten. The intersection, and dislocation, between trauma and remembrance is a main theme, as is the topic of collective memories in post-conflict societies. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Exclusion: AMS199H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS196H1 - Religion and Violence

Hours: 24S

This seminar explores the roles of religion in extreme violence. Working backward from the 1990s (Rwanda, Yugoslavia), we will consider cases including Guatemala, Cambodia, Indonesia, the Holocaust, Armenians, German Southwest Africa, and genocide of Indigenous peoples in North America. Students will produce a final project based on original research. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS197H1 - Medieval Medicine

Hours: 24S

This course focuses on the theories and practices of medicine in Europe, c.500-1500, by examining surviving evidence from the period, including (in translation) pharmaceutical recipes, diagnostic guides, doctor’s records, treatises on anatomy, surgery and gynecology, commentaries on Hippocrates and Galen, laws and regulations for physicians, university lectures, disputes in court records, satirical writings against physicians, and so on, as well as visual evidence of artifacts, surgical instruments, manuscript illumination/diagrams, hospital sites and design. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS198H1 - Decolonizing Women's History

Hours: 24S

This course introduces students to the historiographical and theoretical debates in women's and gender history from a global perspective, with emphasis on the local histories of women in the non-western world. Students will study the themes in women's history as articulated by first and second wave feminists. The second part of the class deconstructs the basic assumptions of Western feminism through the perspective of post-colonial feminist writings and empirical studies. The readings are structured so that you consider how examples from Asia disrupt narratives of universality in Western feminist epistemologies. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS199H1 - Phantom Museums: History and Social Media Archives

Hours: 24S

What role does social media play in the spread of historical falsehoods? Platforms like Instagram, TikTok, Facebook, and YouTube are relatively new, but the hidden power structures that shape their content are not. This course explores the relationship between social media platforms and history in two ways. First, class discussions, workshops, and guest lectures introduce students to overlooked histories of social media itself, including the rise of the early internet and its roots in histories of race, LGBTQ+ expression, sex work, and capitalism. Second, we explore how and why social media platforms promote the spread of historical misinformation, while censoring or burying accurate and important historical content. Our course focuses on the big histories behind algorithms while offering students hands-on experience building original, critical historical content for social media. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS200H1 - Drunk History

Hours: 24L/12T

Histories of wine or beer or vodka often focus either on the production of these alcoholic beverages and their role in national or local economies, or on the ways that drinking is part of celebration. But drunkenness enters the historical record in other ways, too—not just as a social lubricant but as a social ill, one associated with intimate violence or violence to the self and with mass protest. From worries about the Gin Craze to race-based restrictions on consumption, from tax policies to policing, this class will consider the many ways that drunkenness has been accepted, denounced, and legislated in societies around the world.

Exclusion: HIS195H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS205H1 - From Women's History to Gender History

Hours: 24L/10T

This course critically examines gender in the context of politics, society, culture, and economics across a range of comparative times and spaces depending on instructor expertise. In what ways have gendered norms and transgressions been part of human societies and lived experiences? How have those norms shifted across historical and geographical contexts? How has the history of gender impacted gender as it is lived and made political today?  Throughout the course, we will be querying the theoretical assumptions underlying and framing the historical texts we are studying, as well as assessing the different kinds of primary sources used to recover women’s and gender history.

Exclusion: HIS245Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS205Y1 - Topics in Women's History

Hours: 48L/20T

This course introduces students to the diverse experiences of women from a comparative perspective. Students will study how women’s strategies have shaped the major cultural, economic, political and social processes in the world and how these processes have affected women’s experiences in their particular societies.  By studying women’s history from both local and global perspectives, students will engage critically with claims that women’s history is universal.  The local focus of the course will rotate between Africa, Asia, Europe, and North America, depending on the expertise of the instructors.

Exclusion: HIS245Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3), Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HIS208Y1 - History of the Jewish People

Hours: 48L/20T

An introduction to the history of the Jews throughout the world over the past two thousand years.

Recommended Preparation: HIS102Y1/ HIS103Y1/ HIS109Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS218H1 - Environmental History

Hours: 24L/8T

A lecture-based course designed to introduce students to key moments and concepts in the field of environmental history since c. 1400. This course will track the reciprocal influence of humans and the non-human world since the so-called "Columbian Exchange," emphasizing the ways in which the non-human world-from plants, animals, and disease organisms to water, topography, and geography- have shaped human endeavours. At the same time, students will engage with many of the ways in which human beings have shaped the world around us, from empire and colonization, to industrial capitalism, nuclear power, and modern wildlife conservation.

Prerequisite: any 100-level History course
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS220Y1 - The Shape of Medieval Society

Hours: 48L/20T

Political, religious, and educational ideas and institutions of the Middle Ages, from the late Roman period to the fifteenth century, with a focus on primary sources, to listen to as many medieval voices as possible.

Exclusion: HIS220Y5/ HIS220H5/ HIS221H5/ HISB60H3/ HISB61H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS221H1 - African American History to 1865

Hours: 24L/10T

An introduction to the history of Africans and people of African descent in the Americas generally, and the United States in particular. Major themes include modernity and the transatlantic slave trade; capitalism and reparations; Atlantic crossings; African women, gender, and racial formations; representation, resistance, and rebellion; nation-building; abolitionism and civil war; historical method and the political uses of the past.

Exclusion: HIS298Y1 (2016-17)
Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level course in Arts or Humanities
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS222H1 - African American History from 1865 to the Present

Hours: 24L/10T

This course examines the history of black people in the United States after the abolition of slavery. Major themes include the promise and tragedy of Reconstruction; gender and Jim Crow; race and respectability; migration, transnationalism, and 20th century black diasporas; black radical traditions and freedom movements; intersectionality and black feminisms; the drug war and mass incarceration; sexuality and the boundaries of blackness.

Exclusion: HIS 298Y1 (2016-17)
Recommended Preparation: Any 100 level course in Arts or Humanities
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS230H1 - Indigenous and Early Colonial Caribbean History

Hours: 24L/12P

This course introduces students to the study of Caribbean history from first human settlement to the late 18th century. Subject matter covered includes indigenous social structures, cosmology and politics; the process of European conquest; the economics, society and political order of colonial society; the Middle Passage; the everyday lives and struggles of enslaved peoples.

Exclusion: HIS294Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS231H1 - Revolution and Emancipation in the Colonial Caribbean

Hours: 24L/12P

This course explores the history of the late eighteenth and nineteenth century Caribbean, from the Haitian Revolution to the U.S. occupation of Cuba and Puerto Rico. Students learn about the first struggles for political independence; the struggle to abolish the slave trade; slave emancipation; indentureship and struggles to define freedom after emancipation.

Exclusion: HIS294Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS240H1 - World War I in Europe

Hours: 24L/10T

Many scholars believe that the initial 1900s had only been an extension of the 19th century and that the First World War opened the next age. Many feel that it changed Europe and the entire world and started a long period of military conflicts, genocides, nationalism, and high-speed modernization. This course will offer the most important facts related to the Great War and discuss their consequences. The course will demonstrate that it is difficult to understand our contemporary world without basic knowledge of World War I, that we are all grandchildren of that war.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS241H1 - Europe in the Nineteenth Century, 1815-1914

Hours: 24L/10T

An introduction to modern European history from Napoleon to the outbreak of World War I. Important political, economic, social, and intellectual changes in France, Germany, Austria-Hungary, Italy, and other countries are discussed: revolution of 1848, Italian and German unification, racism and imperialism, the evolution of science, art, and culture, labour protest, and the coming of war.

Exclusion: EUR200Y1/ EUR200Y5/ FGI200Y5/ HIS241H5/ HISB93H3
Recommended Preparation: HIS103Y1/ HIS109Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS242H1 - Europe in the 20th Century

Hours: 24L/10T

The evolution of European politics, culture, and society from 1914: the two world wars, Fascism and Nazism, the post-1945 reconstruction and the movement towards European integration.

Exclusion: EUR200Y1/ EUR200Y5/ FGI200Y5/ HIS242H5/ HISB94H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS243H1 - Early Modern Europe, 1450-1648

Hours: 24L/10T

The political, social, economic, and intellectual history of continental Europe. The Renaissance, the Reformation, Counter-reformation, growth of the territorial monarchies, the religious wars.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS244H1 - Early Modern Europe, 1648-1815

Hours: 24L/10T

The political, social, economic, and intellectual history of continental Europe. Development of royal absolutism, social change and the crisis of the ancient regime, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, the Napoleonic era.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS245H1 - European Colonialism, 1700- 1965

Hours: 24L/10T

This course will introduce students to the history of European colonialism. It will analyze the nature of colonial rule, the impact of empire on both colonies and metropoles, and delve into questions of power, gender and culture. It considers slavery and abolition, imperial networks, colonial capital, colonial competition, colonial cultures, the twilight of colonial rule, and a variety of settings.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS247H1 - The Second World War: A Global History

Hours: 24L/12T

This course offers an introduction to the global history of the Second World War. It aims to expose students to historiographical debates regarding the war, the use of primary sources, and the scholarly and intellectual challenges that come with studying an event of this magnitude and horror. In general, students will examine the origins and causes of the conflict, survey the factors that shaped the course of the war, and consider how and why the fighting came to an end when it did. These broad approaches will be supplemented with consideration of specific examples from around the world.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS250Y1 - History of Russia

Previous Course Number: HIS250H1

Hours: 48L/20T

This course introduces the history of the modern Russian Federation and its predecessor states from the founding of Moscow through the ages of the Russian Empire and of the Soviet Union to the present day. Emphasis is placed on reading primary source documents.

Exclusion: HIS250H1/ HIS250H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS251Y1 - History of East Central Europe

Hours: 48L/20T

The Polish, Czech, and Hungarian background; the Balkans in the late medieval and early modern periods. Renaissance, Reformation and Counter-reformation, decline and national awakening to the beginning of the 19th century. Partitioned Poland, nationalism in the 19th century; World War I, Peace Settlement, interwar years and the Communist period.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS262H1 - Canada: A Short History of Here

Hours: 24L/10T

Designed for non-history students, this introductory survey fulfills the Society and Its Institutions breadth requirement.  It is open to all who want to know more about Canada.  Make sense of politics today and develop a deeper understanding of Canadian society and its institutions through study of the major events and demographic trends that have shaped the development of this country.  Topics will include First Nations/newcomer relations (including treaties and the Truth & Reconciliation report), French/English relations (including Quebec separatism), regionalism, the North, economic history, constitutional developments, and the development of Canadian identity, including common symbols associated with Canada.  No essay requirement.  Instead, enhance your critical reading and thinking skills through short writing assignments and weekly discussions of tutorial readings.


*This course will not count towards History program requirements or as a prerequisite for upper level courses*

Exclusion: HIS263Y1, HIS264H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS264H1 - Critical Issues in Canadian History

Hours: 24L/12T

This course introduces key issues in Canadian history and foundational principles of historical analysis. It is primarily designed for potential History majors/specialists. It is not a comprehensive survey. Examples serve to deepen analysis and introduce important methods and debates, preparing students for upper year courses in Canadian history.

Exclusion: HIS262H1, HIS263Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS265Y1 - Black Canadian History

Hours: 48L/20T

This course explores the historical experiences of persons of African descent in Canada. We begin by examining the presence of free and enslaved Africans in New France and British North America, moving into twentieth century themes exploring Black liberation, immigration and resistance in Canada. The course brings into sharp focus the historical production of racial categories and racist thought and practice in Canada and examines the experiences of Black Canadians within the context of ‘multiculturalism.’

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS266H1 - Asian Canadian History

Hours: 24L/10T

The course examines the history of Asian Canadians from the mid-1800s to the present by analyzing their contributions to the socio-cultural, economic, and political development of Canada. It explores how Asian Canadian history reconfigures prevailing understanding of race, migration, multiculturalism, and national identity through intersectional, comparative, and transnational frameworks.

Exclusion: CDN230H1, UNI230H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS267H1 - Business History

Hours: 24L/10T

Business, and its history and evolution, is a fundamental aspect of understanding modernity. Capitalism and globalization, two of the most important aspect of business and its history, shape our world in profound ways. Utilizing a “glocal” approach that combines global and Canadian business history cases within a transnational context, this course seeks to interrogate and understand the evolution and development of modern business, capitalism and globalization from the late 19th Century into the early 21st.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS268H1 - Law and History

Hours: 24L/10T

The Federal Interpretation Act of Canada states that the ‘law is always speaking’. If the law is always speaking, then it must be speaking in present tense. But if it only speaks in present tense, does it have a past? How might we consider the field of law from different historical angles? This course will introduce students to different historical approaches to and uses of law. Using examples from a wide array of legal traditions (e.g. Common Law, Civil Law, Indigenous Law, Islamic Law), the course will help students gain a greater appreciation for the function, study, and development of law across different times and places.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS271Y1 - American History Since 1607

Hours: 48L/20T

A survey of the economic, social, cultural, and political history of the United States from the colonial era to present times.

Exclusion: HIS271H5/ HIS272H5/ HISB30H3/ HISB31H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS280Y1 - History of China

Hours: 48L/20T

A critical history of the place we today call China from prehistoric times to the 21st century, tracing shifting borders, identities, governments, and cultures while challenging any singular definition of "China."

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS282Y1 - History of South Asia

Hours: 48L/20T

An introductory survey addressing major themes in the history of South Asia, examining South Asian political economy, social history, colonial power relations and the production of culture. Emphasis is on the period after 1750, particularly the study of colonialism, nationalism, and postcolonial citizenship and modernity.

Exclusion: HIS282H5/ HISB57H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS283Y1 - History of Southeast Asia: How the Lands Below the Winds Reshaped the World

Hours: 48L/20T

This course examines how the cultural, economic, religious, and social histories of "Southeast Asia" [Brunei, Cambodia, East Timor, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar (Burma), the Philippines, Thailand, & Vietnam] shaped the world as we see it today. Lectures will demonstrate how the millennia-long cultural and material exchanges Southeast Asians engaged via water across the Indian and Pacific Oceans and the lands across Eurasia affected the lives of its inhabitants and the proximal and distant regions with which it had contact. In Tutorials, students will be trained to read primary sources. Themes to be explored include economic exchange, colonialism and its impact, gender and sexual diversity, and religion and society.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS285H1 - History of Chinese Diasporas in the Americas

Hours: 24L/12T

Explores histories of ethnic Chinese and Chinese diasporas in the Americas, especially in Canada and the United States. Investigates events from the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. Topics include migrations, diasporas, transnationalism, identities, families, communities, cultures, and racialization, as well as relations with their host societies and with China.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS286H1 - Oral Histories of Asian Canadians

Hours: 24L/12T

This course explores the cultural and social history of everyday life as it affected Asian Canadians with focus on Chinese, Filipinos and South Asians from the 1960s to present. It introduces oral history and documentary film as key research methods for understanding changing cultural practices and identities within families, in food, and in social settings within and beyond ethnic communities.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS291H1 - Latin America: The Colonial Period

Previous Course Number: HIS291Y1

Hours: 24L/10T

The evolution of Spanish and Portuguese America from pre-Columbian civilizations to the wars of independence.

Exclusion: HIS291Y1/ HIS290H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS292H1 - Latin America: The National Period

Previous Course Number: HIS292Y1

Hours: 24L/10T

A survey of Latin American history from the wars of independence to the present day.

Exclusion: HIS292Y1/ HIS290H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS293H1 - The Making of the Atlantic World, 1480-1804

Hours: 24L/10T

This course introduces students to the social, economic, cultural and political history of the Atlantic world resulting from European exploration and colonization in the Americas beginning in the 1490s and the growth of the transatlantic slave trade. It focuses on interactions between Africans, Europeans, and Amerindians around the Atlantic Ocean.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS295Y1 - History of Africa

Hours: 48L/24T

An introduction to African history and the methodology of history more broadly, this course sets out to question how historians do history, examine differences in theories of knowledge, and explore the relationship between academic and cultural representations of the past. The course also draws on anthropology and related disciplines.

Exclusion: HIS381H1/ HIS382H1/ HIS295H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1), Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HIS297Y1 - History of Africa from a Gender Perspective

Hours: 48L/20T

This survey of African history is analytical rather than narrative in its approach. It rethinks the way that African history has hitherto been conceptualized and taught by placing the question of gender at the center of the story of Africa.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS298Y1 - Themes & Issues in History

Hours: 48L/20T

This is a thematic survey course addressing issues of gender, class, ethnicity, religion, war, economics and political strife through broad-sweep coverage of a region’s history. Prepares students for upper-level study through exposure to eyewitness primary sources and conflicting secondary interpretations of events.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS299Y1 - Research Opportunity Program

Credit course for supervised participation in faculty research project. Details at https://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/academics/research-opportunities…. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities

HIS300H1 - Energy and Environment in Canadian History

Hours: 24L

This course examines the history of energy in Canada from the perspective of environment, business, state, daily life, and culture, with emphasis on the twentieth century. Topics include Big Oil, large dams, nuclear power, energy colonialism, pipeline disputes, climate change, daily life, and the relationship between energy and social power.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

JSH300H1 - Literature and History in Russia

Hours: 24L

History and Literature were always interconnected in Russia. Writers not only sought to reflect the society around them, but were themselves often social critics and political figures. The course examines key texts in Russian literary tradition both as works of art and as primary sources for the historian. All readings in English.

Recommended Preparation: HIS250H1/ HIS250Y1 or SLA240H1/ SLA241H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

HIS301H1 - World War II France

Hours: 24L

This third-year lecture course examines the experience of the Second World War in France. Special attention is paid to questions of collaboration, resistance and accommodation. Other topics include the role of the French overseas colonies in this era, the issue of internal vs. external resistance, and the fate of civilian populations. Students engage with a set of primary and secondary sources as well as visual material that includes films.

Exclusion: VIC102H1
Recommended Preparation: A course in modern European history
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS302H1 - Material Culture in Victorian Britain

Hours: 24L

An examination of the products of the first and second industrial revolutions in Victorian England. This course focuses on the cultural history of commercialization and consumerism.

Recommended Preparation: HIS109Y1 or HIS241H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS303H1 - The Mediterranean, 600-1300: Crusade, Colonialism, Diaspora

Hours: 36L

The course treats contact and conflict between Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the premodern Mediterranean world. Within the framework of broad political and economic developments, the course explores a range of topics, including holy war, slavery, religious polemics, colonialism, the commerce in goods and ideas, and ethnic relations.

Recommended Preparation: HIS220Y1 or NMC273Y1 or some medieval history
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS304H1 - Topics in Middle East Histories

Hours: 24L

An in-depth examination of Middle East historical issues. Content in any given year depends on instructor. See History Website for more details.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS305H1 - Death and Life in Plantation America

Hours: 24L

This course examines the experiences of enslaved people in the Americas and introduces students to the complex history of the ‘plantation’ as a site of violence; social, economic, labour and political organization and experimentation; kinship, culture and community recreation and rebellion. The course will focus on the 17th to 19th century Caribbean in comparative and transnational relationship to the continental Americas.

Prerequisite: HIS230H1/ HIS271Y1/ HIS291H1/ HIS295Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

JHM307H1 - Islamic Legal History: Formation and Encounters

Hours: 24L

This course examines the formation and encounters of Islamic Law with Legal Others from roughly the 8th century CE to the early formation of the Ottoman Empire. The Islamic legal tradition arose in a complex historical context in which legal traditions mapped onto, and gave legal cover to, imperial polities. As the Islamic polity expanded, so too did the imagination of jurists having to contend with new realities (political, geographic, economic, and otherwise). This course will introduce students to the formation of Islamic law in a context of contending legal orders, its ongoing encounters with legal orders in the course of Islamic expansion, and the retraction of Islamic legal orders and institutions as a tradition that anticipated political sovereignty experienced the limits of that sovereignty. Examples will be drawn from the Middle East, Africa, South Asia, and South East Asia. The course will introduce students to the disciplinary focus of Law and History through a focus on doctrine, institution, and the implications on both as territory and people are subject to varying waves of imperial designs and local resistance.

Prerequisite: HIS268H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS308H1 - The Mediterranean, 1300-1700

Hours: 36L

This course continues with the themes treated in HIS303H1, specifically in the context of relations between the Ottoman empire and European states and the growing impact of the Atlantic world on the Mediterranean.

Prerequisite: HIS303H1
Exclusion: HIS303Y1
Recommended Preparation: HIS220Y1/ HIS243H1/ NMC273Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS309H1 - Global Reformations

Hours: 36L

The Reformation has traditionally been approached as a 16th century European phenomenon. This course will consider religious reform movements from the 15th to 18th centuries and set these into a global framework, considering spatial and sensory dimensions, cross-cultural engagements and exchanges, and intersections with race and colonization.

Prerequisite: One of HIS102Y1/ HIS109Y1/ HIS243H1. Students who do not meet these prerequisites are encouraged to contact the Department.
Exclusion: HIS340H5/ RLG346H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS311H1 - Canada in the World

Previous Course Number: HIS311Y1

Hours: 24L

Ranging from the fifteenth through to the turn of the twenty-first century, students will learn about the treaties, trade agreements and alliances, as well as the informal traditions, working relationships and cultural ties that shape relations of people living within the boundaries of present-day Canada with the world. For this course, “international relations” is broadly defined, including military, political, economic, environmental and immigration policies, both official and informal.

Exclusion: HIS311Y1/ HIS311H5/ HISC46H3
Recommended Preparation: A course in Canadian history or politics
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS312H1 - Immigration to Canada

Hours: 24L

From the colonial settlement to 21st century, immigration has been a key experience and much debated in Canadian life. Drawing on primary sources, as well as historical and contemporary scholarship, this course will discuss migration, citizenship and belonging as central features in Canada’s experience of immigration. This course focuses on the individuals, groups, and collectives who built, defined, contested, and reimagined this country, to help make and remake Canada through immigration.

Recommended Preparation: HIS263Y1/ HIS264H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS313H1 - Animal History

Hours: 24L

What happens to history when we take the category of the animal as the subject? This course pursues the history of people and other animals since the early modern period, with a thematic focus located in the Atlantic world.

Recommended Preparation: HIS218H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS314H1 - Twentieth-Century Quebec

Previous Course Number: HIS314Y1

Hours: 24L

This course will explore the history of Quebec in the 20th century. In addition to looking at more traditional themes focused on nationalism and constitutional politics, we will also look at the history of encounter between groups of different backgrounds and origins. As such, we will place a large emphasis on colonialism and Indigenous history, and the politics of language, race, and immigration. Themes will include, among others, the history of Quebec in an era of British imperialism, jazz, the art world, literature, the Oka Crisis, and Quebec’s ties to Haiti and other parts of the non-Western world.

Exclusion: HIS314Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS315H1 - Decolonial Vietnamese Histories

Hours: 24L

This course introduces students to the narratives that diverse actors have used to talk about Vietnamese histories. We will focus on the histories and perspectives of the indigenous peoples of the peninsula, ethnic minority groups, as well as that of the majority "Kinh people." We'll explore themes which have been central to shaping the geographic space, the socio-political regimes, and the cultural entity we now call "Viet Nam," while examining how varying types of historical method and archival strategies can influence the telling of histories. What kinds of techniques did Vietnamese and Western political actors, scholars, and writers, employ to narrate the Vietnamese past(s) and how do these visions tell us about the crafter of these narratives? What counts as “history” and who gets/got to decide? Whose experiences were relevant in the different epistemological approaches?

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS316H1 - Competing Colonialism in Northeast China The Harbin Experiment

Hours: 24L

This course explores the political, social, and cultural history of Harbin, one of the major cities of Manchuria/Northeast China, the product of competing Russian, Japanese, and international colonialism during the first half of the twentieth century, and an early case of multi-ethnic emigration and multiculturalism.

Prerequisite: HIS250Y1 or HIS280Y1 or HIS281Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS317H1 - 20th Century Germany

Hours: 36L

A survey of modern German history in the twentieth century. Topics include World War I and the postwar settlement, the Weimar Republic, the National Socialist dictatorship, the Holocaust, the division of Germany, the Cold War, German reunification, Germany and the European Union, nationalism, political culture, war and revolution, religious and ethnic minorities and questions of history and memory.

Prerequisite: HIS103Y1/ HIS109Y1/ ( HIS241H1, HIS242H1)/ EUR200Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS318H1 - Histories of the "Wild" West

Hours: 24L

What happens when histories of North America begin in the West? This course examines the critical challenges that the myths and legacies of the West pose to North American history, from pre-contract to 1990. Themes include First Nations and colonialism, immigration, racism, economic development, regionalism, prostitution and illegal economies.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS319H1 - Histories of the Horn of Africa

Hours: 24L

A critical, introductory survey exploring major themes in the political, social, economic, and cultural histories of the Horn of Africa [Somalia, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Eritrea, Sudan, South Sudan] and surrounding Red Sea and Indian Ocean from prehistoric times to the present.

Recommended Preparation: HIS295Y1/ HIS297Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS320H1 - Barbarian Invasions and the Fall of the Roman Empire

Hours: 24L

Covers major events and themes for the period 300-600, including decline of Greco-Roman paganism, conversion to Christianity, individual barbarian groups (Ostrogoths, Visigoths, Huns, Burgundians, Vandals, Franks, Lombards), their culture and impact on empire, Justinian's reconquests.

Recommended Preparation: HIS220Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS321H1 - Dark Age Europe, 7th-10th Centuries

Hours: 24L

Surveys major events and figures for the period c. 600-1000, including: Pope Gregory the Great, the Merovingian Franks, Lombard Italy, Byzantine civilization, the rise of Islam, Charlemagne, the Carolingian Renaissance, the Vikings, Anglo-Saxon England to King Alfred, the Ottonians.

Exclusion: HIS320Y1
Recommended Preparation: Some ancient history, ancient Greek or Latin language, early Christianity, Celtic history, Old Irish and Old English languages.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS322H1 - Topics in African History

Hours: 24L

Selected topics on a specific period, aspect or themes in African history. Topics in any given year depend on the instructor.

Recommended Preparation: HIS295Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

JHN323H1 - Indigeneity in the Caribbean

Hours: 24L

Explores the legacies of the pre-Columbian era, as well as the post-1492 experiences of people of pre-Columbian Caribbean ancestry. Examines the origins and consequences of the Caribbean's narrative of "indigenous absence", as well as the relationship between indigeneity, globalization and diaspora.

Prerequisite: INS201Y1/ HIS230H1/ HIS231H1/ CAR120Y1/ CAR220H1/ CAR221H1/ NEW224Y1/ CAR225H1/ CAR226H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS323H1 - Rites of Passage and Daily Life in the Middle Ages

Hours: 36L

Reflecting on the life cycle and rites of passage in the medieval period gives the opportunity to study the daily lives of peasants, nobles, monks, nuns, and burghers, and to observe from an interesting angle the differences between female and male life experiences.

Recommended Preparation: A course in the Middle Ages in any discipline
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS325H1 - Imperial Russia

Hours: 24L

This course focuses on Russia's history during a period of remarkable change and turbulence, when the country more firmly established its far-flung empire while simultaneously attempting to define itself as a nation. From the wars and reforms of Peter the Great through the end of the empire during the First World War, the course touches on questions of social and cultural change, and the political events that allowed or constrained them.

Prerequisite: HIS250H1/ HIS250Y1/permission of instructor
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS326H1 - Topics in Asian Histories

Hours: 24L

A specific period in some aspect of Asian histories. Topics in any given year depend on the instructor.

Prerequisite: HIS280Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS327H1 - Rome: The City in History

Hours: 24L

This course investigates the development of Rome from its mythical foundations, through the Empire, the Middle Ages, Renaissance and Baroque to the modern city, illustrating the shift from the pagan to the papal city and its emergence as the capital of a united Italy after 1870 and a modern European metropolis.

Prerequisite: At least 1.0 credit European History course(s)
Exclusion: VIC348Y1 (offered in Fall/Winter 2012-2013, 2013-2014, 2014-2015 and 2015-2016) and VIC162H1 (offered in Fall 2016, Fall 2017 and Fall 2018)
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS328H1 - Modern China

Previous Course Number: HIS328Y1

Hours: 24L

An examination of political, social and economic developments in modern Chinese history to the present day. Main topics may include the decline of the Imperial order and the challenge of Western imperialism; the Republican period; the rise of the Communist movement; the Peoples Republic of China.

Prerequisite: HIS280Y1/ EAS102Y1
Exclusion: JMC201Y1, HIS328Y1
Recommended Preparation: HIS380H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS329H1 - Central Middle Ages (900-1200)

Hours: 36L

A chronological survey from 900, with the foundation of Cluny by the Duke of Aquitaine, the last waves of Vikings, and the decline and end of the Carolingian Empire, up to 1200, with the Battle of Bouvines, the more formal organization of the first universities and the construction of the Gothic cathedrals. The main question will be: what happens when there is no real central power? Why did the term “Feudalism,” now nicknamed the F word by medievalists, was judged inappropriate to describe the situation?

Prerequisite: 9.0 credits including 1.0 HIS credit excluding HIS262H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS330H1 - Germany from Frederick the Great to the First World War

Hours: 24L

Topics include German reactions to the French Revolution, Napoleonic occupation, the Wars of Liberation, industrial expansion, the Revolutions of 1848, unification in 1871, Bismarck and Kaiser Wilhelm II, everyday life, gender relations, avant-garde culture, nationalism, antisemitism, colonialism, and the Great War of 1914-18.

Prerequisite: 1.0 HIS credit at the 100- or 200-level excluding HIS262H1
Exclusion: HIS341Y1
Recommended Preparation: HIS241H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS331H1 - Modern Baltic History

Hours: 24L

The history of the Baltic countries, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania from 1900 to the present day, with emphasis on the emergence of independent Baltic states, World War II, communist era, the Baltic Revolution, the restoration of independence and European integration.

Recommended Preparation: HIS250H1/ HIS250Y1/ HIS251Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS332H1 - Crime and Society in England, 1500-1800

Hours: 24L

The changing nature of crime and criminal justice in early-modern England; the emergence of modern forms of policing, trial and punishment.

Prerequisite: 9.0 credits, including 1.0 HIS credit excluding HIS262H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS333H1 - Catholic Asia in the Early Modern Era, 1500-1800

Hours: 24L

This course examines the impact of Catholicism in Asia, from its introduction to its relevance in the contemporary global order. Students will be introduced to how Catholicism and the technologies accompanying it affected historical transitions in local communities in Asia as well as how the growth of these communities has affected the global Catholic Church.

Prerequisite: 1.0 credit in European or Asian history. Students who do not meet the prerequisite are encouraged to contact the Department.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS334H1 - World War II France

Hours: 24L

This third-year lecture course examines the experience of the Second World War in France. Special attention is paid to questions of collaboration, resistance and accommodation. Other topics include the role of the French overseas colonies in this era, the issue of internal vs. external resistance, and the fate of civilian populations. Students engage with a set of primary and secondary sources as well as visual material that includes films.

Exclusion: VIC102H1
Recommended Preparation: A course in modern European History
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS335H1 - Canadian Legal Histories

Hours: 24L

This course examines Canadian legal history through differing Indigenous, civil, and common law legal traditions, using multiple categories of analysis, including race, gender, class, spirituality and sexuality. Legal history is a strong and engaging field of study in Canada. Topics will include constitutional histories, treaties, law-making, differing systems of land tenure, the franchise and the structure of deliberative bodies (e.g. legislatures), courts and systems of justice, policing and criminal law, punishment (including histories of incarceration and alternatives).

Prerequisite: 4.0 credits including HIS263Y1/ HIS264H1. Students who do not meet the prerequisite are encouraged to contact the Department.
Exclusion: HIS389H1 (offered as "Ontario's Treaties: The First Law of the Land"), taken in Winter 2020, (offered as "Topics in Canadian Legal History"), taken in Winter 2021, (offered as "Canadian Legal Histories"), taken in Winter 2023.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS337H1 - Culture, Politics and Society in 18th Century Britain

Previous Course Number: HIS337Y1

Hours: 24L

Deals with England, Scotland, Ireland and the Atlantic World. Addresses major political, social, economic, intellectual and cultural highlights of the "long" eighteenth century. Deals with enlightenment, industrialization and the loss of the first British empire. Interrogates Britain's emerging status as a world power.

Exclusion: HIS337Y1
Recommended Preparation: EUR200Y1/ HIS109Y1/ HIS243H1/ HIS244H1/ HIS368H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS338H1 - The Holocaust, to 1942

Previous Course Number: HIS338Y1, HIS398Y1

Hours: 24L/5T

German state policy towards the Jews in the context of racist ideology, bureaucratic structures, and varying conditions in German-occupied Europe. Second Term considers responses of Jews, European populations and governments, the Allies, churches, and political movements.

Prerequisite: Completion of 6.0 credits
Exclusion: HIS388Y1/ HIS398Y1/ HIS338H5
Recommended Preparation: A course in modern European history
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS339H1 - History of Modern Israel

Hours: 24L

This course explores the history of the Jewish state from the rise of Zionism to the present. Topics include the Zionist-Arab conflict, immigration, the construction of a new Hebrew identity, interactions between religion and state, the impact of the Holocaust, and the relationship between Israel and the Jewish diaspora. 

Prerequisite: HIS208Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS340H1 - The Ottoman Empire, 1800-1922

Hours: 24L

The course examines the history of the Ottoman Empire from the beginning of the 19th c. until its dissolution in the course of World War I. Topics include Ottoman reforms, relations between the Empire’s populations and the state, the diplomatic interactions known as “the Eastern Question,” the Young Turk revolution, gender, and intellectual, cultural and artistic developments.

Prerequisite: 1.0 HIS credit at the 200-level excluding HIS262H1
Exclusion: HIS389H1 (The Ottoman Empire, 1800-1922)
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS341Y1 - Germany Among the Global Empires 1840-2010

Hours: 48L

This course places Germany's long national history in a transnational and global context, exploring its place among the global empires of Britain, Russia, France and the United States from the mid-seventeenth century to the present. Events of the German nation-state's political, social and cultural developments are analyzed through a framework focused on both military expansion and the development of the world economy after 1700. Particular attention is paid to the interplay between strategies for a global expansion and transformations in national culture, looking at Germany in the world and the world in Germany.

Prerequisite: Two HIS courses from the following: HIS102Y1/ HIS103Y1/ HIS107Y1/ HIS109Y1/ HIS241H1/ HIS242H1/ HIS243H1/ HIS244H1/ EUR200Y1/ HIS250Y1/ HIS271Y1
Recommended Preparation: HIS102Y1/ HIS109Y1/ HIS241H1/ HIS242H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1), Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS342H1 - Political and Psychological Liberation in 20th Century Africa

Hours: 24L

This course examines the growth of movements for the political liberation of Africa and the psychological liberation of Africans from Western imperialism and cultural hegemony. Postcolonial thinking and art was fundamental to the project of decolonization. It uses primary text and films to explore African cultural and intellectual history.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS343H1 - History of Modern Intelligence

Hours: 24L

This course explores the rise of modern intelligence over the long 20th century, from Anglo-Russian imperial competition before World War I through to the post-9/11 era. Students will study the contribution of intelligence services to victories and defeats in war, peace, and the grey areas in between. The course will also examine the relationship between intelligence services and society.

Exclusion: HIS343Y1
Recommended Preparation: HIS103Y1 or an equivalent introduction to modern international relations
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS344H1 - The Global Cold War

Hours: 24L

This course examines the Cold War through its global dimensions, going beyond the American-Soviet bipolar rivalry to explore the impact of the Cold War in Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Students will work closely with original primary sources and interrogate historical interpretations of the Cold War through different regional and thematic perspectives.

Exclusion: HIS344Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS345H1 - History and Film

Hours: 24L

This course is designed to further students knowledge of films relationship to the events they depict and their undeniable power as representational systems to render history effectively. This will necessarily entail both close examination of the formal systems film rely upon and an understanding of the distinction between fictional and non-fictional forms in film.

Prerequisite: 2.0 HIS credits excluding HIS262H1. Students who do not meet these prerequisites are encouraged to contact the Department.
Recommended Preparation: CIN201Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS346H1 - Rice, Sugar, and Spice in Southeast Asia: a History of Food in the Region

Hours: 24L

This course examines the importance of food products in the livelihoods of the inhabitants of Southeast and in the world economy. It traces the circulation of these products within the Southeast Asian region in the pre-modern period, into the spice trade of the early modern era, and the establishment of coffee and sugar plantations in the late colonial period, and the role of these exports in the contemporary global economy.

Recommended Preparation: 1.0 credit in Asian or European history
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

HIS347H1 - The Country House in England 1837-1939

Hours: 24L

This course examines class distinction and community through the lens of the English country house from 1837 to 1939. Topics include owners, servants, houses, collections, gardens and rituals such as fox hunting.

Prerequisite: A course in British or European history
Recommended Preparation: HIS349H1/ HIS302H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS348H1 - Topics in Gender History

Hours: 24L

An in-depth examination of issues in gender history. Content in any given year depends on instructor. See History website for more details.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS349H1 - History of Britain: Struggle for Power

Hours: 24L

An introduction to the history of modern England with emphasis on the search for identity with reference to the nation, the crown, class, gender, age, political parties, race and ethnicity.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS350H1 - Topics in European Histories

Hours: 24L

Selected topics on a specific period and/or region in European Histories

Prerequisite: 4.0 credits
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS351H1 - The Soviet Union and After

Previous Course Number: HIS351Y1

Hours: 24L

A survey of the history of Twentieth-Century Russia, from the collapse of the Russian Empire and the establishment of the Soviet Union through to the end of the Cold War and the establishment of a new Russian Federation. The social, economic, and political developments of the era are emphasized.

Prerequisite: HIS250Y1
Exclusion: HIS351Y1/ HIS351H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS352H1 - A History of Women in Pre-colonial East Africa

Hours: 24L

This course examines the lived experience of women in societies, communities and polities of varying sizes across territories that cover eight contemporary East African states. It encompasses the period from 1000 B.C to the end of the nineteenth century. Topics covered are clustered under four broad themes: a) Ecology, work in commodity production, wealth and exchange relations; b) “Institutional” power, ideology and structures; c) “Creative” power particularly in the areas of healing, resistance/contestation and transformation; and d) Violence, war and vulnerability.

The course challenges present day gender and identity categories applied to Africa’s deep past and highlights critical nuances of gender, identity and power dynamics in Africa.

Prerequisite: AFR150Y1 or any course in African History
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS353Y1 - Poland: A Crossroads of Europe

Hours: 48L

Social and political history of Poland from the 10th to the 20th century. Analysis of the political history in a broader, central European context; consequences of Christianization of medieval Poland and the Polish-Lithuanian union; Sarmatian culture, Antemurale, Polish Messianism and Cordon sanitaire.

Prerequisite: HIS251Y1/permission of the instructor
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS355H1 - A History of Pre-modern Medicine

Hours: 24L

This course surveys major themes and developments in the history of medicine from c.600 BCE to 1800 CE. Topics include: Hippocrates, Galen and their reception in the Middle Ages; monasteries, medicinal gardens and hospitals; medieval licensing of physicians and pharmacists; medieval scholastic medicine; the Black Death; Renaissance anatomy and charlatans; New World drug discoveries; William Harvey's heart, William Withering's foxglove, the isolation of morphine.

Prerequisite: 1.0 credit in medieval or pre-modern history. Students who do not meet the prerequisite are encouraged to contact the Department.
Recommended Preparation: HIS220Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS356H1 - War in Canadian History

Hours: 24L

This course examines war as a major force in the history of Canada from the so-called colonial period to recent times. In addition to key dynamics in military history (e.g. battles, military organization), the course will stress the links between war and society, politics, empire and colonialism, technology and environment, memory and commemoration, and identity. Topics may include indigenous warfare and diplomacy, imperial rivalry in early North America, Canada and the British Empire, the world wars, the Cold War, and peacekeeping. Soldiers and peaceniks are both welcome and will be equally happy and annoyed.

Recommended Preparation: HIS264H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS357Y0 - The Renaissance

HIS358H1 - Canadian History in 100 Objects

Hours: 24L

The Canadian history course focuses on museums and material culture (history of objects). Using museum visits, lectures, and workshops, students in this course have an opportunity to conduct original research on how artefacts (and the institutions that house them) offer us new ways of thinking about the past.

Prerequisite: HIS264H1 or HIS263Y1
Exclusion: HIS389H1 (Material Culture in Canada)
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS359H1 - Regional Politics and Radical Movements in the 20th Century Caribbean

Hours: 24L

The role of nationalism, race and ethnicity, class conflict and ideologies in the recent development of Caribbean societies; Europe's replacement by the United States as the dominant imperial power in the Caribbean; how this mixture of regional and international pressures has led to widely differing political systems and traditions.

Recommended Preparation: HIS294Y1/( HIS230H1, HIS231H1)
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS360H1 - Critical Histories of the Black Canadian Experience

Previous Course Number: HIS360Y1

Hours: 24L

This course explores the long history and diverse experiences of African Canadians in Canada. Topics may include slavery, the underground railroad, migration, and Black life in rural and urban Canada throughout the 20th century. Discussions will be situated in broad and transnational debates about race.

Exclusion: HIS360Y1
Recommended Preparation: Any 100 or 200 level HIS course
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS361H1 - The Holocaust, from 1942

Hours: 24L/5T

Follows on HIS338H1. Themes include: resistance by Jews and non-Jews; local collaboration; the roles of European governments, the Allies, the churches, and other international organizations; the varieties of Jewish responses. We will also focus on postwar repercussions of the Holocaust in areas such as justice, memory and memorialization, popular culture and politics.

Prerequisite: Completion of 6.0 credits and HIS338H1
Exclusion: HIS338Y1/ HIS361H5
Recommended Preparation: A course in modern European history
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS362H1 - Topics in Early American History

Hours: 24L

Special topics in Early American History (to 1830). Topics will vary by the instructor and year.

Prerequisite: 4.0 credits
Recommended Preparation: HIS271Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS363H1 - Dynamics of Gender in Canadian History

Hours: 24L

A lecture course which deals thematically with gender issues in Canadian history (including familial roles, changing patterns of work and employment, and participation in the public sphere).

Prerequisite: HIS263Y1/ HIS264H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS364H1 - From Revolution to Revolution: Hungary Since 1848

Hours: 24L

This course offers a chronological survey of the history of Hungary from the 1848 revolution until the present. It is ideal for students with little or no knowledge of Hungarian history but who possess an understanding of the main trends of European history in the 19th and 20th centuries. The focus is on the revolutions of 1848-1849, 1918-1919, the 1956 Revolution against Soviet rule and the collapse of communism in 1989. The story has not been invariably heroic, violent and tragic.

Prerequisite: A 100 level HIS course
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS365H1 - History of the Great Lakes Region

Hours: 24L

This course is a survey of the Great Lakes Region as a “trans-national space” from the 1780s to recent times. Attention is focused on the development of the region from indigenous space to industrial heartland and its subsequent deindustrialization. Key themes include economic development, colonialism and re-settlement, environmental history (particularly of the lakes themselves), and the role of the Canada-US border in shaping the region. The course includes material from both Canadian and American history. Considerable attention is paid to Toronto as a Great Lakes city.

Recommended Preparation: HIS264H1 or HIS271Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

JIH366H1 - Indigenous Histories of the Great Lakes, 1815 to the Present

Previous Course Number: HIS366H1

Hours: 24L

Explores the history of Aboriginal peoples (Indigenous and Metis) living in the Great Lakes Region after the Great Lakes were effectively split between British North America (later Canada) to the north and the united States to the south, when a rapidly increasing newcomer population on both sides of the border marginalized Indigenous peoples and settled on their land. Topics include a comparative examination of Indigenous experiences of colonialism, including treaties and land surrenders as well as the development of government policies aimed at removing and/or assimilating Great Lakes peoples. This course will also study resistance by First National and Tribal Councils to those programs over nearly two centuries and assess local strategies used for economic and cultural survival.

Prerequisite: HIS263Y1/ HIS264H1/ HIS271Y1/ INS200H1/ INS201Y1
Exclusion: HIS366H1/ HIS369Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS367Y0 - The City in Central Europe – Ideas, Culture, Revolutions and Renewal

Hours: 48L

The cities of Central Europe, and most notably those of the Habsburg Empire, were at the forefront of Europe’s cultural, artistic and intellectual development until the outbreak of the Second World War. Moreover, these cities remain living monuments to the achievements of European culture to the present day. These cities also represent some of the darker aspects of European history. The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the history of Central Europe, the complex historical role of central European cities, their interaction with imperial and then national cultures, economies and societies, and their importance in creating modern nation states.

Offered in summer only as part of the Summer Abroad Program.

Prerequisite: 1.0 HIS credit excluding HIS262H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS368H1 - Early Modern Britain, 1485-1660

Hours: 24L

Introduction to the political, social and religious history of early modern England, Scotland and Ireland. Particular attention will be paid to the history of the monarchy, the Protestant Reformation, gender issues and relations between different parts of the British Isles.

Recommended Preparation: EUR200Y1, HIS109Y1/ HIS243H1/ HIS244H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

JIH369H1 - Great Lakes Indigenous Histories to 1830

Previous Course Number: HIS369H1

Hours: 24L

Explores the history of Aboriginal Peoples (Indigenous and Métis) living in the Great Lakes Region from the 16th century to the aftermath of the War of 1812. Weaving together interdisciplinary sources, this course examines central events in Great Lakes history including the formation of the Wendat and Haudenosaunee Confederacies and key Anishinabek alliances, the arrival of European newcomers into an Indigenous landscape, the social-political impact of new diseases, reactions to European missionaries, the fur trade, major conflicts and peace processes including the Great Peace of Montreal, the Treaty of Niagara and the 60 Years War for the Great Lakes; and ending with the period of significant encroachment of new settlers on Indigenous lands.

Prerequisite: HIS263Y1/ HIS264H1/ HIS271Y1/ INS200H1/ INS201Y1
Exclusion: HIS369H1/ HIS369Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS370H1 - Modern Palestine

Hours: 24L

Weekly lectures provide an overview of the political struggles over Palestine between Zionist and Palestinian national movements in the twentieth century in the context of British colonialism, UN negotiations and resolutions, Third-Worldism, superpower rivalry and everyday cooperation and occupation on the ground.

Exclusion: HIS339H1
Recommended Preparation: HIS340H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS371H1 - Canadian Political History

Hours: 24L

This course examines the history of Canadian politics from the late colonial period to the recent past. Lectures and tutorials will focus attention on specific political issues (responsible government, Confederation, war, welfare, battles over voting rights, campaigns for social change, etc) but also consider the deeper structural, social, economic, and cultural dynamics that shaped politics over time. The course takes a broad view of politics (elections and parties but also social movements, interest groups, bureaucracy). A key theme is the nature of political power in a democratic polity.

Prerequisite: HIS264H1/ HIS263Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS372H1 - Topics in U.S. History

Hours: 24L

In-depth examination of selected periods or themes in U.S. history. Topic in any given year depends on instructor. See History website for more details.

Exclusion: HIS372H5/ HISD36H3
Recommended Preparation: HIS271Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS373H1 - Servants and Masters, 1000- 1700

Hours: 36L

This course will explore the history of all types of servants, from the ladies-in-waiting to the domestic slaves, in Western Europe between 1000 and 1700. The goal will be to observe especially their working and living conditions, as well as the changing perception of service through time.

Recommended Preparation: A course on the Middle Ages and/or a course on the Early Modern Period in any discipline
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS375H1 - Crime and Punishment in the Early Modern World

Hours: 36L

What did it take to break the law in the period 1400-1800, and how were people prosecuted and punished when they did? We will review the kinds of crimes that triggered arrest, the different types of law codes in place and the importance of the revival of Roman law, ways of avoiding prosecution, the criminalization of “deviance”, judicial processes in colonization, and variations based on age and gender. We’ll also look at forms of punishment, including the varieties of corporal and capital punishment, the operation of prisons, the use of exile and transportation.

Prerequisite: 4.0 credits
Exclusion: HIS357Y1
Recommended Preparation: HIS243H1/ HIS244H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS377H1 - U.S.A. in the World

Previous Course Number: HIS377Y1

Hours: 24L

A survey of the history of American foreign relations focusing on the 20th century to the present. Themes include imperial expansion and the uses of power; the relationship of business and government in U.S. foreign policy; and the role of culture and ideas in Americas relations with the world.

Recommended Preparation: HIS271Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS378H1 - America in the 1960s

Hours: 24L

A survey of one of the most turbulent decades in American history. Examines the political, social, economic and cultural revolutions that transformed the face of America.

Prerequisite: HIS271Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS379H1 - Vietnam at War

Hours: 24L

This course examines war in modern Vietnam, beginning with Vietnamese nationalism in the 19th century to the conflicts with France, the United States, and China. We will consider the military, political, economic, and cultural contexts of these complex and interconnected wars, especially from the viewpoint of the Vietnamese people.

Prerequisite: 1.0 HIS credit in any field excluding HIS262H1
Exclusion: HIS400H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS380H1 - Chinese Canadian History

Hours: 24L

Explores histories of Chinese in Canada, and how scholars have researched, interpreted and analyzed them in ethnic, multicultural, transnational and diasporic contexts. Students will be exposed to a wide range of research approaches including: archives, oral history, community studies, visual studies, popular culture, racial-ethnic studies, and food studies. Chinese in Greater Toronto will be a focus.

Recommended Preparation: HIS266H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS381H1 - Youth in the Early Modern World

Hours: 36L

Adolescence is a time of adaptation between childhood and adulthood, and it’s often described as a modern invention. This course will look at how people in their teens and twenties navigated social demands and expectations around work, law, education, and marriage in the period 1400-1700. The course will address issues around biology, gender, violence, sexuality, mobility, and forced labour, with attention to comparing experiences between distinct traditions in different parts of the early modern world.


Prerequisite: 4.0 credits
Exclusion: HIS357Y1
Recommended Preparation: Any one of HIS205H1/ HIS220Y1/ HIS230H1/ HIS243H1/ HIS244H1/ HIS265Y1/ HIS280Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS382H1 - China from the Mongols to the Last Emperor

Hours: 24L

This course traces the history of Chinese empire from its political reorganization, economic expansion, and cultural efflorescence in the 11th century, through its peak of power in the 18th century, and to its decline during the 19th. We will consider how these centuries broke with as well as continued previous developments, and how they have influenced Chinese and world history in the last 150 years.

Prerequisite: HIS280Y1/ EAS103H1/ EAS209H1 or comparable course in E. Asian/Chinese history
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS383Y1 - Women in African History

Previous Course Number: HIS383H1

Hours: 48L

This course subjects our increasing knowledge about African women’s history from the mid-19th century to the present to critical analysis. It goes beyond restoring women to history and seeing African women as victims impacted upon and struggling against colonialism and neo-colonialism. It examines how African women’s lived experiences have been represented, packaged, and delivered to different audiences.

Prerequisite: HIS295Y1/ HIS297Y1/ AFR150Y1/ AFR250Y1/ AFR351Y1/ POL301Y1 or permission from the Instructor
Exclusion: HIS383H1/ HISC97H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS384H1 - The Baltic Sea Region from the Vikings to the Age of Nationalisms

Hours: 24L

This course traces political, cultural and socio-economic developments in North-Eastern Europe, the Baltic Sea region, from the Viking Age to the end of the 19th century. Topics include the crusades, the Hanseatic League and trade, the Reformation, the struggle for hegemony between the Swedish and Russian empires, the Enlightenment, national movements, and industrialization.

Prerequisite: 9.0 credits including 1.0 HIS credit
Recommended Preparation: A course in European History
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

JHA384H1 - Japan in the World, Mid-16th to Mid-20th century

Hours: 24L

This course examines Japan within the context of world history from the mid-16th to the mid-20th century. Rather than seek comprehensive coverage of Japan's national history along a linear timeline, we will use Japan as a lens through which to consider key moments in the history of the modern world.

Prerequisite: One course from: HIS102Y1, HIS103Y1, HIS107Y1, HIS241H1, HIS242H1, HIS244H1, HIS250H1, HIS250Y1, HIS271Y1, HIS280Y1, HIS281Y1, HIS282Y1, HIS283Y1, HIS291H1, HIS291Y1, HIS292H1, HIS292Y1, HIS297Y1, or 1.0 credit from CAS200H1, CAS201H1, CAS202H1, CAS310H1, CAS320H1.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

JMH385H1 - Islamic Law and the Modern State

Previous Course Number: NMC385H1

Hours: 24L

What happens to the shariʿa when it is applied by modern nation-states? This course introduces students to the way states, with Muslim majorities and minorities, from Canada to Malaysia, passing by Nigeria, Palestine, Iran, and Pakistan approach, accommodate, or apply Islamic law. We also discuss the way Muslims, lay and scholarly, talk about, practice, and follow Islamic law under modern states. Based on an examination of law in practice, we will be able to theorize modern transformations of the shariʿa and provincialize the modern state and its legal regime.

Prerequisite: NMC103H1/ RLG204H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HIS385H1 - The History of Hong Kong

Hours: 24L

A study of political, economic, and social change in the British colony of Hong Kong from 1842 until the present day.

Exclusion: Students cannot take both the Y and H version of HIS385
Recommended Preparation: HIS280Y1/ JMC201Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS385Y0 - The History of Hong Kong

Hours: 48L

A study of political, economic, and social change in the British colony of Hong Kong from 1842 until the present day.

Offered in summer only as part of the Summer Abroad Program.

Exclusion: Students cannot take both the Y and H version of HIS385
Recommended Preparation: HIS280Y1/ JMC201Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS386H1 - Fascism

Hours: 24L

A comparative and transnational examination of fascist movements and regimes in Europe during 1919-1945. Beginning with Mussolini in Italy and Hitler in Germany, this course analyzes manifestations of the phenomenon in various European countries, including France, Spain, the Baltic states, Central Europe and Scandinavia. We analyze the factors that led to fascist movements obtaining power in certain countries and to their failure in others. Collaboration with Nazi Germany during the Second World War is also explored. Finally, we discuss whether the concept of ‘generic’ fascism can also be applied to other regions and periods.

Prerequisite: 9.0 credits, including 1.0 HIS credit excluding HIS262H1
Exclusion: HIS389H1 (Topics in History: Fascism), offered in Winter 2018 and Winter 2019
Recommended Preparation: A course in European History
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS387H1 - France, 1610-1848

Previous Course Number: HIS388Y1

Hours: 24L

This course considers the history of France, from the rise of absolutist monarchy under the seventeenth-century, Bourbon monarchs, through the Enlightenment, the Revolution and Napoleonic Empire, and the Restoration, to the fall of the constitutional monarchy in 1848.

Prerequisite: one HIS/FRE course
Exclusion: HIS388Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS388H1 - France Since 1830

Previous Course Number: HIS388Y1

Hours: 24L

A study of French society, politics and culture from the Paris Commune to the 1990s. Special attention is paid to watersheds like the Dreyfus Affair and the Vichy regime, to issues of regionalism/nationalism, cultural pluralism, women's rights, intellectual and cultural trends, and decolonization.

Prerequisite: EUR200Y1/one course in HIS/FRE
Exclusion: HIS388Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS389H1 - Topics in History

Hours: 24L

In-depth examination of historical issues. Content in any given year depends on the instructor and further prerequisites vary from year to year. See History website for more details.

Prerequisite: 4.0 credits, including 1.0 HIS credit excluding HIS262H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

HIS389Y1 - Topics in History

Hours: 48L

In-depth examination of historical issues. Content in any given year depends on instructor. See History website for more details.

Prerequisite: 9.0 credits, including 1.0 HIS credit excluding HIS262H1. Further prerequisites vary from year to year, consult the department.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

HIS390H1 - Slavery in Latin America

Hours: 24L

This seminar focuses on the history of African slavery in Latin America from its origins in the fifteenth century to its abolition in the nineteenth century. Readings will draw from primary sources and historical scholarship related to a range of topics, including the slave trade, gender, religious and cultural practices, and emancipation.

Prerequisite: HIS106Y1/ HIS231H1/ HIS291H1/ HIS292H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS391Y1 - Black Freedom in the Atlantic World

Hours: 72L

Black writers and historical actors were at the vanguard of re-conceiving, implementing, and realizing much of the Enlightenment project of freedom. Africans and people of African descent significantly affected its meaning in the Atlantic world. The course sets out to explore this history as well as the contemporary practice of freedom.

Prerequisite: 1.0 credit in African, European, Atlantic World history excluding HIS262H1. Students who do not meet the prerequisite are encouraged to contact the Department.
Exclusion: HIS296Y1/ HIS371H5/ HISC70H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS392Y1 - Screening Freedom

Hours: 48L

This course examines how filmmakers in Africa, The Americas, and Europe have dealt with subjects such as slavery, colonialism, racism and postcolonial issues such as illegal immigration or structural adjustment. The course interpolates texts from HIS391Y1 into these films in order to bring new perspectives to questions of freedom in different media, times, and places.

N.B. This course supplements HIS391Y1.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1), Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS393H1 - Digital History

Hours: 24L

Explores implications for history and its methods of the shift from print to digital sources. Imparts introductory skills in the manipulation digital media, such as the use of maps, GIS and big data.

Prerequisite: 200-level History course/ DHU235H1/ DHU236H1
Exclusion: HIS389H1 (Topics in History: Digital History), offered in Summer 2015, Winter 2016, and Winter 2017
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS394H1 - 20th and 21st Century African Icons: Media and Biography

Hours: 24L

Superseding 19th century European missionary and explorers' accounts of Africa; media in the 20th and 21st centuries have unequivocally played a key role in shaping the globe's views of Africa and Africans. In 2005, BBC Focus on Africa put out an impressive list of more than 100 "African Icons". Since then, a number of websites have come up with various lists of African icons. Who are the African icons and what makes them icons? How have the media contributed in making them icons?

Prerequisite: HIS295Y1/ HIS297Y1/ HIS383H1/ HIS383Y1/ HIS386H1/ HIS481H1/ NEW160Y1/ NEW261Y1/ AFR351Y1/ POL301Y1/ POL361H1 or by permission from the Instructor.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

JHA394H1 - The Asia Pacific War

Hours: 24L

This course examines the Second World War in the Asia Pacific region and highlights: (1) how imperialism and colonialism of both the Euro-American and Japanese varieties were central to the War's outbreak, conduct, and “resolution”; (2) various “local” rather than simply national experiences and memories of the War, including those of marginalized groups in Japan and its colonies, “comfort women,” victims of war atrocities, Asian North Americans, African Americans, and Pacific Islanders.

Prerequisite: One course from: HIS107Y1, HIS242H1, HIS250H1, HIS251H1, HIS263Y1, HIS271Y1, HIS280Y1, HIS281Y1, HIS282Y1, HIS283Y1, HIS284Y1, HIS292Y1, HIS311Y1, HIS317H1, HIS328H1, HIS338H1, HIS343H1, HIS343Y1, HIS344H1, HIS344Y1, HIS351Y1, HIS361Y1, HIS377H1, HIS385H1, HIS385Y1, or 1.0 credit from CAS200H1, CAS201H1, CAS202H1, CAS310H1, CAS320H1.
Recommended Preparation: One or more courses on Japan, China, Korea, or Southeast Asia in any department.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS395H1 - Independent Studies

This course provides an opportunity for exceptional third-year students to undertake an independent research project on a topic for which there is not a suitable course offering. Students must find an appropriate supervisor from the Department, submit a proposal, and receive approval for the project. Students must be enrolled in either a History Specialist or Major program; have taken at least 3.0 HIS credits with a B+ average; and have approval of an instructor willing to supervise the project. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 9.0 credits (Year 3 or higher) including a 77% average in 3.0 HIS credits (excluding HIS262H1)
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

HIS395Y1 - Independent Studies

This course provides an opportunity for exceptional third-year students to undertake an independent research project on a topic for which there is not a suitable course offering. Students must find an appropriate supervisor from the Department, submit a proposal, and receive approval for the project. Students must be enrolled in either a History Specialist or Major program; have taken at least 3.0 HIS credits with a B+ average; and have approval of an instructor willing to supervise the project. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 9.0 credits (Year 3 or higher) including a 77% average in 3.0 HIS credits (excluding HIS262H1)
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

HIS396H1 - The Progressive Era and Rise of Big Business in America

Hours: 24L

This course examines the rise of big business in America and its relationship to social and economic changes in United States in the so-called Progressive Era (roughly 1880-1920). We will focus on several themes: the evolution and characteristics of big business; rise of organized labor; evolution of business-government relations; social and economic reform movements; and the changing status of immigrants, African Americans, and women (both white and African-American). In short, we will be studying a pivotal moment in the transformation of modern American society.

Exclusion: HIS389H1 (Topics in History: Business and Society), offered in Fall 2016 and HIS372H1 (Topics in U.S. History: The Progressive Era and Rise of Big Business), offered in Winter 2018
Recommended Preparation: HIS271Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS397H1 - Political Violence and Human Rights in Latin America

Hours: 24L

This course will explore human rights theory and practice from a Latin American perspective.  There will be a focus on the local derivation, development and impact of the movement for human rights in Latin America.  The course will focus on the history of organized protest against violence in the twentieth century.

Prerequisite: HIS292H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS398H0 - Research Excursions

An instructor-supervised group project in an off-campus setting. Details at https://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/academics/research-opportunities…. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities

HIS398Y0 - Research Excursions

An instructor-supervised group project in an off-campus setting. Details at https://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/academics/research-opportunities…. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities

HIS399Y1 - Research Opportunity Program

Credit course for supervised participation in faculty research project. Details at https://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/academics/research-opportunities…. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

HIS400H1 - The American War in Vietnam

Hours: 24S

This course examines the French and American Wars (1945-75) in Vietnam and its effects on the population of Vietnam and Southeast Asia. It begins with a brief overview of pre-colonial Vietnamese history and moves into a study of the impact and legacies of colonial rule and centres on the impact of the Wars on the cultures, economies, and societies of Southeast Asia.

Prerequisite: By permission of the Instructor
Exclusion: HIS315H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS401H1 - The Cold War through its Archives

Previous Course Number: HIS401Y1

Hours: 24S

The course reviews the history of the Cold War in light of formerly-secret archival documents. Examples include the US White House Tapes and Venona decrypts; massive declassification of records in the ex-Soviet bloc; and parallel developments in China, Cuba, and other Communist states. Archival discoveries have cast new light, not just on individual episodes (e.g., Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962, Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in 1979) but on the origins, strategies, and driving forces of this 45-year conflict. The focus will be mainly on the superpowers and their alliance systems.

Prerequisite: HIS311Y1/ HIS344H1/ HIS344Y1/ HIS377H1
Exclusion: HIS401Y1, HIS306H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS403H1 - Jews and Christians in Medieval and Renaissance Europe

Previous Course Number: HIS403Y1

Hours: 24S

The course focuses on aspects of Jewish-Christian relations ca.300-1600, such as royal and ecclesiastical Jewish policies; religious polemics; intellectual collaboration; social and economic interaction; anti-Judaism and religious violence. (Joint undergraduate-graduate)

Exclusion: HIS403Y1
Recommended Preparation: HIS208Y1/ HIS220Y1/ HIS243H1/ HIS322Y1/ HIS357Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS404H1 - Senior Seminar in U.S. History

Hours: 24S

Selected topics in U.S. history. Topics in any given year depend on the instructor. Please see History website for details.

Prerequisite: HIS271Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS405Y1 - Canadian Foreign Relations

Hours: 48S

A course on Canadian external relations since 1945. Topics include Canada and the Cold War, the Korean War, the Suez crisis and the war in Vietnam, membership in international organizations, and bilateral relations with other countries. (Joint undergraduate-graduate)

Prerequisite: HIS311Y1/ POL312Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS406H1 - Advanced Topics in Gender History

Hours: 24S

An in-depth examination of issues in gender history. Content in any given year depends on instructor. See History website for more details.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS407H1 - Imperial Germany, 1871-1918

Hours: 24S

Historiographical controversies and the latest empirical findings concerning social conflict and political mobilization under Bismarck and Wilhelm II. Problems raised by competing schools of interpretation include definitions of the authoritarian state, bourgeois hegemony, localism and regionalism, radical nationalism, workers' culture, and gender relations. (Joint undergraduate-graduate)

Prerequisite: HIS317H1, HIS330H1. Students who do not meet the prerequisite are encouraged to contact the Department.
Exclusion: HIS407H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS408H1 - Topics in Environmental History

Hours: 24S

This advanced undergraduate seminar will explore themes in environmental history. Thematic focus will vary from year to year, and may include extinction, nuclear power in environmental history, empire and environment, toxicity and contamination, climate change, the Columbian exchange, the Anthropocene, agriculture, animals, and/or other themes. Time period and geographical focus will also vary in keeping with the thematic focus of this course.

Prerequisite: HIS218H1 or HPS316H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS409H1 - Spas and Water Cures

Hours: 24S

This fourth-year seminar immerses students into the rich world of mineral water cures. It explores the relationship between the medical sciences and society, and the connections between prescriptive and normalizing medical rituals and sites of pilgrimage, capitalism, and sociability. The seminar will also focus on shifting medical meanings, on gender dynamics at these sites, and on uses and practices surrounding hot water springs, as well as varied experiences of spa towns as sites of leisure and tourism. The course is transnational and features case studies in Mexico, Madagascar, Britain, Germany, Tunisia, Japan, France, Austria, Hungary, Greece, and Canada.

Prerequisite: 2.0 HIS credits
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS411H1 - Great Trials in History

Hours: 24S

This seminar course will study a handful of great trials in close detail. Using materials from the modern period in Europe and North America, we will look at the clash of ideas represented in these high-profile cases, the historical setting in which they were embedded, the human drama, legal and sometimes constitutional issues, and their impact both on their societies and our own.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS413H1 - Slave Emancipation in the Atlantic World

Hours: 24S

This course explores the long process of the ‘unfinished revolution’ of abolition in the Atlantic World from the 18th-late 19th century Atlantic World. It will take a comparative and transnational approach, with materials that include primary printed sources, classic texts, current historiography, literature, explorations of the history of emancipation through digital and visual culture. We will examine scholarship and historical debates about abolition in the Caribbean, North and South America, West Europe and Africa.

Prerequisite: 0.5 credit from: HIS221H1, HIS230H1, HIS231H1, HIS244H1, HIS245H1, HIS265Y1, HIS271Y1, HIS291H1, HIS295Y1, HIS357Y1, HIS373H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS414H1 - Down and Out in Medieval Europe

Hours: 24S

Explores the life conditions of individuals on the lower echelons of medieval society (the poor, servants and apprentices, the exiled, prisoners, slaves, foreigners and lepers). In parallel, we will discuss the various conceptions of poverty that prevailed in the Middle Ages. These objectives will allow us to glimpse the European Middle Ages from an unusual angle as well as reflect on important socio-economic and religious changes.

Recommended Preparation: A course on the Middle Ages in any discipline
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS415Y1 - Nationalism & Memory in Modern Europe

Previous Course Number: HIS415H1

Hours: 48S

Investigates the modern concept of the nation and its connections to the idea of collective memory in twentieth-century Europe. Through reading and discussing seminal works on nationalism and national memory, we will discuss the connections between modern notions of nation and practices of remembering.

Prerequisite: Two history courses from the following: HIS102Y1, HIS103Y1, HIS109Y1, HIS241H1, HIS242H1, HIS243H1, HIS244H1, HIS245H1, EUR200Y1, HIS317H1
Exclusion: HIS415H1
Recommended Preparation: HIS102Y1, HIS109Y1, HIS241H1, HIS242H1, HIS243H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS416H1 - Orientalism and Nationalism in Nineteenth-Century Germany

Hours: 24S

In 1771, with the translation of the Zend-Avesta by the French Scholar Anquetil-Duperron, a new era opened in German national culture. From the philosophy of Johann Gottfried von Herder to the novels of Thomas Mann, this course analyzes the ways in which German writers defined the substance and place of national culture in their writings about India, Central Asia and the East.

Prerequisite: HIS241H1, and one of HIS242H1/ HIS317H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS417H1 - Sex Work History in Comparative Contexts

Previous Course Number: HIS417Y1

Hours: 24S

This seminar explores the historical effects of the "world's oldest profession" in Canada and beyond. Using a range of texts, including film, memoirs, oral history and visual culture, it seeks to enhance both historical and contemporary discussions of the sex trade by examining its rich, difficult and problematic pasts. Seminar readings and discussions will examine the lives and experiences of multiple sex trade-involved populations, from affluent 19th-century madams to streetwalkers and queer and trans communities.

Prerequisite: HIS263Y1/ HIS264H1
Exclusion: HIS417Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS418H1 - Themes in Canadian Environmental History

Hours: 24S

Environmental historians study the reciprocal relationship between humans and nature over time. This course examines key themes in the history of Canada's environment. Possible topics include food, energy, pollution, cities, parks, and environmental movements. Specific themes vary by year, depending on the focus of the instructor. Strong emphasis is place on reading and research.

Prerequisite: 9.0 credits
Recommended Preparation: HIS263Y1/ HIS264H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS419H1 - Canada By Treaty: Alliances, Title Transfers and Land Claims

Hours: 24S

A detailed study of the treaty process between indigenous peoples and newcomers in Canadian history, with examination of the shift between alliance treaties to land surrender agreements from the colonial period through to the signing of recent treaties including the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement and the Nisga’a Final Agreement.

Prerequisite: HIS263Y1/ HIS264H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS420H1 - Russia's Great Patriotic Wars

Hours: 24S

The course examines Russia’s wars with Napoleon and Hitler, both as military campaigns and as important nation-building events, largely through memoir literature.

Prerequisite: HIS250H1/ HIS250Y1/ HIS325H1/ HIS351Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS421H1 - Oral History

Hours: 24S

Exploration of oral history interview research methods, their contributions to the History field, and practical training in the skills and art of doing oral history. This is a research workshop course, oriented to developing student research projects, and each student will do oral history research. Topics include: memory, interviewing, ethics, interpreting oral testimonies and issues in community-engaged research.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS422H1 - Early Modern English Popular Culture, 1500-1800

Hours: 24S

Deals with issues of orality, literacy, gender, class, cultural bricolage and vernacular epistemology – the constituents of popular, as opposed to elite knowledge - through the study of folklore, magic, religion, drink, sex, riot and festivity in early modern England. Some background in medieval and/or early modern history or literature is highly recommended. Extensive work will be undertaken with primary printed sources.

Prerequisite: HIS101Y1/ HIS109Y1/ HIS220Y1/ HIS243H1/ HIS244H1/ HIS368H1/ HIS337H1/ HIS349H1/ HIS357Y1
Exclusion: HIS496H1 (Topics in History: Early Modern English Popular Culture, 1600-1800), offered in Summer 2018
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS423H1 - Social History of Medicine in the 19th & 20th Centuries

Hours: 24S

Introduces students to current issues in the social history of medicine and some of the major developments in the modern history of the discipline. The format is class discussion based on themes covered in the course textbook, covering such topics as the history of the doctor-patient relationship, changes in physicians' social status, changing attitudes toward the body, and the evolution of various medical and surgical specialties including obstetrics and gynecology. (Joint undergraduate-graduate).

Exclusion: HIS423Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS424H1 - Violence in Medieval Society

Hours: 24S

This seminar explores the social function and meaning of violence in medieval society, and the development of rituals and institutions to control violence. Among the topics treated: Germanic blood feud, aristocratic violence and chivalry, criminal justice systems, violence against minorities, and violence and gender. (Joint undergraduate-graduate)

Prerequisite: HIS220Y1/ HIS320H1/ HIS321H1/ HIS322H1
Exclusion: HIS327Y5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS425H1 - From the Weimar Republic to Nazi Germany: How Do Democracies Die?

Hours: 24S

This seminar on Weimar and National Socialist Germany analyzes the advent of the country’s first democracy after WWI, its destruction between 1929 and 1933 and the subsequent building of the National Socialist dictatorship. How does the destruction of Germany’s first democratic republic provide a map for how democracies die? What lessons can Germany’s history provide for the current political moment? In analyzing the country’s movement from democracy to dictatorship an interdisciplinary variety of texts will be studied, covering topics from political violence and economic instability, to the languages of civil society and the importance of trust in a democratic polity.

Prerequisite: 14.0 credits including 2.0 HIS credits
Exclusion: HIS496H1 (offered as "Weimar and Nazi Germany: How do Democracies Die?") taken in Fall 2019, 2022.
Recommended Preparation: At least one of HIS241H1, HIS242H1, HIS330H1, or HIS317H1.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS426H1 - Early Medieval Italy 300-1000 CE

Hours: 24S

This seminar examines major developments in Italy 300-1000, including the Christianization of Italy, the collapse of Roman rule, the establishment of several barbarian successor kingdoms, and changes in architecture, art and literature in a period known as Italy's Dark Ages.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS427H1 - History and Historiography in the Golden Legend

Hours: 24S

The Golden Legend or Readings on the Saints, compiled by Jacobus de Voragine C. 1260, serves as the basis for a seminar on the relation of history and legend as understood in the High Middle Ages. (Joint undergraduate-graduate)

Prerequisite: HIS220Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS428H1 - Medieval Institutes of Perfection

Hours: 24S

The first goal of this seminar is to help students read the sources with a more critical eye, especially narrative sources (Lives of Saints) and normative sources (rules and customaries). The second goal is to study the evolution of the monastic ideal from its origin to the 12th century. (Joint undergraduate-graduate)

Prerequisite: A course specifically on the Middle Ages such as HIS220Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS430H1 - The Two Germanies and the Cold War, 1949-1989

Hours: 24S

This course explores central themes of the field of postwar German and Cold War history from national, European and global history perspectives. It familiarizes students with significant events, texts, dates and actors in its analysis of the histories of the two postwar German states and explores German history as a microcosm of Cold War relations. In analyzing the two Germanies after 1949 an interdisciplinary variety of texts will be studied, covering topics from diplomacy and economy, to gender, memory, politics and geopolitics.

Prerequisite: 14.0 credits including 2.0 HIS credits
Exclusion: HIS496H1 (offered as "The Two Germanies and the Cold War, 1949-1990") taken in Winter 2019, (offered as "The Two Germanies and the Cold War") taken in Fall 2020.
Recommended Preparation: HIS241H1, HIS242H1, HIS330H1, HIS317H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS432H1 - Topics in Medieval History

Hours: 24S

The students define together with the professor eight different topics (e.g. relics, masculinity, leprosy, clothes, recluses, peasants houses, gynecology and the peace of God). Each topic is approached through a class discussion, on the basis of a common corpus of secondary sources, plus presentations by the students.

Prerequisite: A course in Medieval history such as HIS220Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS433H1 - Polish Jews Since the Partition of Poland

Hours: 24S

To explore the history of Polish Jews from the Partitions of Poland to the present time, concentrating on the 19th and the first half of the 20th centuries: situation of Polish Jews in Galicia; Congress Kingdom of Poland; Prussian-occupied Poland before 1914; during World War II; and post-war Poland. Focus on an analysis of primary sources. (Joint undergraduate-graduate)

Prerequisite: HIS208Y1/ HIS251Y1/permission of the instructor
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS434Y1 - Kievan Rus

Hours: 48S

The origin of Rus, international trade, the impact of nomadic peoples, the introduction of Christianity, the economic system an the problem of feudalism, the political structure and the dilemma of princely succession; literature and architecture; the displacement of political power centres and depopulation, the preservation of the Kievan heritage. (Joint undergraduate-graduate)

Prerequisite: HIS220Y1/ HIS250H1/ HIS250Y1/ HIS320H1/ HIS321H1/ HIS322H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS435H1 - Themes in Toronto History

Hours: 24S

This course will examine aspects of Toronto’s history. It is not a general survey of Toronto history; instead, the course will normally revolve around a specific theme or group of themes. Specific themes vary by year, depending on the focus of the instructor. Strong emphasis will be placed on reading and research.

Prerequisite: HIS263Y1/ HIS264H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS436H1 - Stalinist Terror

Hours: 24S

This research seminar explores topics and issues of violence in the Soviet Union in the 1930s, beginning with forced collectivization and ending with the Great Terror. The seminar focuses on new archivally-based research and aims to contextualize Stalinist terror within larger theories of political and social violence.

Prerequisite: HIS250Y1 (B or higher) or HIS351Y1 (B or higher)
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS437H1 - Telling Lies About Hitler: Frauds and Famous Feuds Among German Historians

Hours: 24S

Examines historiographical controversies and their public reception. Topics include the forged Hitler diaries, the David Irving trial, German responsibility for 1914, Daniel Goldhagen’s “eliminationist” thesis, Auschwitz as an “Asiatic deed,” Wehrmacht complicity in the Holocaust and retrospective films about East Germany.

Prerequisite: HIS317H1/ HIS330H1 or permission of the instructor
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS438H1 - Inquisition and Society in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Hours: 24S

Focusing on the institution of the inquisition, this seminar explores the response of ecclesiastical and secular authorities to religious heterodoxy. Among the groups prosecuted by the inquisition discussed: Cathar heretics in France, crypto-Jews and crypto-Muslims in Spain, and witches in Italy.

Recommended Preparation: HIS220Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS439H1 - Russia's Empire

Hours: 24S

This course examines ways in which the Russian Empire and Soviet Union expanded their territories, the ways they controlled those colonies, and the ways in which they dealt with rising nationalism both at home and abroad.

Prerequisite: HIS250H1/250Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS440H1 - Maps and History

Hours: 24S

Examines the use of maps through the ages to depict spatial relationships and political, social, or cultural authority. Explores the visual display of quantitative information, the evolution of historical atlases, and cartographic crime. Such topics as Lebensraum and gerrymandering illustrate how maps can distort historical processes and communal relationships.

Recommended Preparation: At least three History courses at the 200/300 level
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS442H1 - Jews and the Holocaust in the Soviet Union

Hours: 24S

This course is an advanced research seminar in Soviet history. It will explore the Jewish experience in the Soviet Union, with a focus on the Holocaust. The seminar will begin with an examination of the history of Jews in the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union in the years leading up to the Second World War. Then the course will pivot directly to the topic of the Holocaust on Soviet soil. How did the Holocaust in the “east” differ from the Holocaust in the “west”? How did the conduct of war condition genocide in the Soviet Union? How did Soviet Jews and non-Jews respond to the German genocide? What was the response of Stalin and the Soviet government to the Holocaust? How is the Holocaust remembered by the states and people of the former Soviet Union.

Prerequisite: HIS351Y1 or a course on the Holocaust
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS443H1 - Space and Sense in the Early Modern World

Hours: 24S

How did early moderns experience sense and space and how did the expanding cultural, political, and social horizons of the period emerge from and shape those experiences? This course explores Florence, Amsterdam, Boston, Manila to compare how experiences of space and sense varied by age, gender, race, and class.

Prerequisite: HIS243H1/ HIS244H1/ HIS357Y1. Students who do not meet the prerequisite are encouraged to contact the instructor.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS444H1 - Topics in Jewish History

Hours: 24S

Selected topics on a specific period or theme in Jewish history. Topic in any given year will depend on the instructor. Please see History website for details.

Prerequisite: A course in modern European or Jewish history
Recommended Preparation: A course in Jewish history
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS445H1 - Nationalism

Hours: 24S

What is a nation? Are nations ancient or modern, unchanging or malleable? Do nations create states, or does the state create the nation? This course seeks to answer these questions through an examination of nationalism, primarily in Europe, from the 1700s through the present.

Prerequisite: 2.0 HIS credits in European history. Students who do not meet the prerequisite are encouraged to contact the Department.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS446H1 - Gender and Slavery in the Atlantic World

Previous Course Number: HIS446Y1

Hours: 24S

The course examines the relationship between gender and the experience of slavery and emancipating several Atlantic world societies from the 17th-19th centuries. Areas to be covered are the Caribbean, Brazil, the U.S. South, West and South Africa and Western Europe.

Prerequisite: HIS291H1/ HIS294Y1/ ( HIS230H1, HIS231H1)/ HIS295Y1
Exclusion: HIS446Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS449Y1 - Ukrainian National Revival

Hours: 48S

The role of the intelligentsia in East European national revivals; the ethnographic and literary revival; the language question; the press and cultural organizations; education; religion; and political movements. (Joint undergraduate-graduate)

Recommended Preparation: One of the following: JHP204Y1/ HIS241H1/ HIS251Y1/ HIS445H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS450H1 - Senior Seminar in African Histories

Hours: 24S

Senior seminar discussing readings on a specific period, aspect or themes in African history. Topics in any given year depend on the instructor.

Prerequisite: HIS295Y1/ 1.0 credit alternative African History course
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS451H1 - World War II in East Central Europe

Hours: 24S

The fall of the Versailles system, German and Soviet diplomatic and military activities and their occupational policies in East Central Europe during World War II, economic exploitation, collaboration, resistance, and genocide in the discussed region, its liberation and sovietization in 1944-1945. (Joint undergraduate-graduate)

Prerequisite: EUR200Y1/ HIS251Y1/ HIS334H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS455Y1 - Hacking History: Digital Projects Capstone Class

Hours: 48S

This course provides a unique opportunity to grapple with the challenges of public history, while exploring new methods and technologies in the digital humanities. Each year, we partner with one or more community groups to create historical websites which endure well beyond the school year. Topics vary annually.

Prerequisite: HIS393H1, equivalent experience, or instructor's permission
Recommended Preparation: Basic HTML/CSS skills as learned in self-paced online introductions
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS457H1 - The French Revolution and the Napoleonic Empire

Hours: 24S

Explores the central themes in the history of the French Revolution: the causes of the Revolution; the contested varied efforts to build a new regime; the invention of a novel republican political culture; counterrevolution and Terror; the Haitian Revolution; Napoleon and the Empire; the Revolution as a global phenomenon; the Restoration; the Revolution's legacy today.

Prerequisite: HIS243H1/ HIS244H1/ HIS319H1/ HIS341Y1/ HIS387H1
Exclusion: HISC26H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS459H1 - Soviet History and Film, 1921-1946

Hours: 24S

The history of Soviet cinema and the importance of film as a historical source. Documentary and fiction film; editing, narration, and sound; film distribution and exhibition; the Soviet school of montage and socialist realism; nationality and gender; the Soviet musical comedy of the Stalin era; resistance and dissidence.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1/ HIS250Y1/ HIS250H1/ HIS335H1
Exclusion: HIS450Y1/ SLA233H1/ SLA234H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

JIH460H1 - Indigenous Histories of North America

Hours: 24S

This senior seminar takes a regional approach, featuring work written by or in collaboration with Indigenous scholars and Indigenous communities, to draw students into discussion of comparative historiographies, the role of worldview in historical writing and the significant methodological interventions made by Indigenous studies. Students explore oral history and material culture as sources for writing history and discuss ethical research practices for community-based scholarship. In addition to active participation, each student will write a major paper, approximately 15 pages in length, in the form of a review essay on the historiography of either a region or a topic. This course is a joint graduate/undergraduate seminar.

Prerequisite: INS200H1/ INS201Y1/ INS205H1/ HIS230H1/ HIS366H1/ HIS369H1
Recommended Preparation: INS390H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS460H1 - Soviet History and Film, 1941-1991

Hours: 24S

Soviet film as a historical source and the institutional and ideological history of Soviet film production, distribution, and exhibition. Fiction and documentary film during World War II; the cinema of the Cold War and the Thaw; Soviet new realism and the return of the village; avant-garde cinema of the 1960s-80s; memory and historical revision in late Soviet film. Screenings include never-before-seen archival footage, as well as films and film clips subtitled by the instructor.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1/ HIS250Y1/ HIS335H1
Exclusion: HIS450Y1/ SLA233H1/ SLA234H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

HIS461H1 - Poland in the 20th Century

Hours: 24S

The 20th century has been an age of experiments for Poland. Universal, general problems of democracy, authoritarianism, totalitarianism, communism, socialism, free market and centrally planned economies, are examined, as are the ongoing adjustments made by the Polish people. (Joint undergraduate-graduate)

Prerequisite: HIS334H1/ HIS353Y1/permission of the instructor
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS464H1 - Religion and Violence in Comparative Perspective

Hours: 24S

Examines varying roles of religion in cases of genocide and extreme violence. Seminar proceeds from recent cases (Darfur, Rwanda, wars associated with break-up of Yugoslavia) backward through the 20th century (Cambodia, Indonesia, the Holocaust, Armenians, Herero) and the 19th century (Belgian Congo, Caucasus, native peoples in the Americas).

Prerequisite: one course in HIS/REL/Peace and Conflict (excluding HIS262H1)
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS465H1 - Gender and International Relations

Previous Course Number: HIS465Y1

Hours: 24S

This seminar explores the use of gender as a category of analysis in the study of international relations. Topics include gendered imagery and language in foreign policymaking; beliefs about women’s relationship to war and peace; issues of gender, sexuality, and the military; gender and global governance; gender and the global economy; sexual violence; and contributions of feminist theory to international relations theory.

Recommended Preparation: 0.5 credit at the 300-level in HIS/POL/WGS
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HIS466H1 - Senior Seminar in Canadian History

Previous Course Number: HIS466Y1

Hours: 24S

Selected topics in a specific period of Canadian history. Content in any given year depends on instructor. Please see the History Department website for complete description.

Prerequisite: HIS263Y1/ HIS264H1 or permission of the instructor
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS467H1 - French Colonial Indochina: History, Cultures, Texts, Film

Previous Course Number: HIS467Y1

Hours: 24S

Examines French colonial Indochina through several different lenses. Themes include the cross-cultural contact zones between colonial and colonized societies, imperial culture, expressions of colonial power, and forms of opposition. Colonial novels, translated resistance literature, documentaries, and films are utilized as primary sources to be examined critically.

Prerequisite: ANT344Y1/ EAS204Y1/ GGR342H1/ HIS104Y1/ HIS107Y1/ HIS280Y1/ HIS283Y1/ HIS284Y1/ HIS315H1/ HIS388H1/ NEW369Y1
Exclusion: HIS467Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS468H1 - Commemorations and Public History in Canada, 1800-2000

Hours: 24S

This course explores selected topics in the history of commemoration, public memory, and public history in Canada. Remembering the past has often involved various groups - political, economic, and social elites - who have attempted to create ‘pasts’ or ‘traditions’ for themselves and others in society, often as part of creating socio-economic and political hegemony. We also will read about their contestation by women, working-class people, and ethnic and racialized groups to counter the powerful’s apparent monopoly on public memory. As well, we will explore how historical memories have shaped and created landscapes, in ways both discursive and material.

Prerequisite: HIS264H1
Exclusion: HIS466H1 (offered as "History of Commemoration in Canada") taken in Winter 2015, Fall 2016 or 2018, (offered as "Commemorations and Public History, Canada, 1800s-2000") taken in Fall 2020 or 2021, (offered as "Commemoration in Canada") taken in Fall 2022.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS469H1 - Upper Canada: Creating a Settler Society, 1790s-1860s

Hours: 24S

This course explores selected topics in the history of Upper Canada: its formation in the crucible of transatlantic and imperial warfare, relationships with Indigenous people, the creation of multiple institutions, and colonial leisure and culture. As well as having its own particular local characteristics and features, not least its proximity to the United States, Upper Canada was one of a number of settler societies within the British Empire. The course explores various dimensions of these aspects and considers the relationships between local dynamics and imperial currents.

Prerequisite: HIS264H1/ HIS263Y1
Exclusion: HIS466H1 (offered as "Upper Canada: Creating a Settler Society") taken in Fall 2014, Winter 2016, 2017, 2019, 2022 or 2023, (offered as "Upper Canada") taken in Fall 2019, (offered as "Upper Canada: Creating a Settler Society, 1790s-1860s") taken in Winter 2021. 
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS470H1 - History, Rights, and Difference in South Asia

Hours: 24S

Addressing South Asian history after 1750, this course examines ideas of rights, contract, and the rule of law in colonial and postcolonial contexts. Attention is paid to the intellectual history of rights and the central place of colonial and postcolonial questions within that history. Topics include rights and questions concerning indigenous culture, caste and customary practice, gender and capitalist development.

Prerequisite: A mark of 73% or higher in HIS282Y1 or instructor's permission
Recommended Preparation: Background in political and social theory and some background in South Asia
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS474H1 - Emancipate Yourselves from Mental Slavery? Historical Narratives of Caribbean Decolonization

Hours: 24S

This course is a critical intellectual history of Caribbean decolonization. It begins with the Haitian Revolution, exploring and comparing how history was mobilized to structure anti-colonial theories about the making of postcolonial Caribbean societies. Key conceptual frameworks to be examined include indigenism, noirism, creolization, métissage; Caribbean interpretations of Marxism, Negritude and Pan-Africanism.

Prerequisite: HIS294Y1/( HIS230H1, HIS231H1)
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS475H1 - Senior Research Seminar

Hours: 24S

In this seminar, students will learn the historical methodology skills required to undertake their major independent research project for future professional use or graduate studies, including the development of a topic, formal literature reviews, and the writing of research and grant proposals. History Specialists & Majors only (priority enrollment for Specialists). Not eligible for CR/NCR option. See department website for prerequisite details and registration instructions. Students may count HIS475H1 towards the Specialty methodology pathway or carry on to HIS476H1: Senior Thesis.

Prerequisite: Consent of supervisor and department
Exclusion: HIS498H1, HIS499Y1, HIS476Y1, HIS491Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS476H1 - Senior Thesis Seminar

Previous Course Number: HIS476Y1

Hours: 24S

Students research and write a primary-sourced based thesis of approximately 7,000 words, building on the prospectus and literature review developed in HIS475H1. Students attend seminar meetings to discuss the hypotheses they have formulated, present their work in progress and engage in constructive critique of other students’ work. History Specialists & Majors only (priority enrollment for Specialists). Students must find topics and thesis supervisors. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. See department website for prerequisite details and registration instructions.

Prerequisite: HIS475H1 and consent of supervisor and department
Exclusion: HIS476Y1, HIS498H1, HIS499Y1, HIS491Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS477H1 - Topics in the Social and Cultural History of Victorian Britain

Hours: 24S

Examination of the impact of industrialism on Victorian society and values. Concentration on Victorian social critics including Engels, Owen, Mayhew, Dickens and Morris.

Recommended Preparation: A course in modern British History/Victorian literature
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS479H1 - US Foreign Policy Since World War II

Hours: 24S

An in-depth study of U.S. behaviour in the global arena since World War II. Particular attention will be paid to the origins and evolution of the Cold War, the Vietnam War, the initiatives of the Nixon-Kissinger years, the end of the Cold War, and the relevance of globalization.

Prerequisite: HIS271Y1/ HIS377H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS480H1 - Modernity and its Others: History and Postcolonial Critique

Hours: 24S

Engaging with influential perspectives in postcolonial historiography, this seminar tracks three major themes in the history of the idea of modernity from the late 18th through the 20th centuries: political freedom, citizenship and the nation-state; capitalism and its critique; and the relationship of history, memory, and identity. (Joint undergraduate-graduate)

Prerequisite: A mark of 73% or higher in HIS282Y1, or instructor's permission; HIS470H1
Recommended Preparation: History of colonialism, political theory, or postcolonial literatures
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS481H1 - Elite Women, Power, and Modernity in Twentieth-Century Africa

Hours: 24S

The role of elite women in twentieth-century Africa has been overshadowed by studies of non-elite women so much so as to suggest that all women lacked power. This course aims to show how a very limited but important group of women negotiated power in a century of increasing patriarchy. It combines gender with class analysis.

Prerequisite: 300-level African History course or any of the African Studies courses offered at U of T.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS482H1 - Soccer: The History of the World's Game

Previous Course Number: HIS199H1

Hours: 24S

This seminar proposes to explore the history of the world's most popular sport, soccer, in broader political, social, and economic context. We will consider critical approaches to the history of sport; modern soccer's emergence in industrializing Britain; its globalization; its mobilization as a vehicle for political expression, as well as social, cultural, and gendered identities; supporter and soccer as an industry.

Prerequisite: Completion of 9.0 credits
Exclusion: HIS199H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS483H1 - Space and Power in Modern Africa

Hours: 24S

This course examines the production, experience, and politics of space in modern Africa from a historical perspective. How is space - local, national, and imperial - produced? In what ways does power inscribe these spaces? This course will explore these questions through a variety of readings examining historical examples and cases from across the continent.

Prerequisite: HIS295Y1/ HIS297Y1 or any 300-level course in African History
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS484H1 - The Car in North American History

Hours: 24S

This seminar examines the history of the car in North America from the perspective of technology, business, landscape and popular culture. Particular attention is paid to issues of production, consumption, geography, and daily life, and to the importance of class race, gender, region, and age in shaping the meaning and experience of car culture.

Prerequisite: HIS263Y1/ HIS264H1/ HIS271Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS485H1 - Topics in Chinese History

Previous Course Number: HIS485Y1

Hours: 24S

A seminar on selected aspects of Chinese history from 1368 to the present. Please see History website for detailed description of topic in any given year.

Prerequisite: EAS102Y1/ HIS280Y1/ JMC201Y1
Exclusion: HIS485Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS487H1 - Animal and Human Rights in Anglo-American Culture

Hours: 24S

Examines the parallel discourses of animal and human rights in Anglo-American culture from the eighteenth century to the present. The courses explores issues of subjectivity and consciousness as well as cruelty and pain. Topics include slavery and abolition, animal welfare and antivivisection, anti-colonial liberation movements, and animal rights campaigns.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS489H1 - The History of Psychiatry and Psychiatric Illness

Hours: 24S

Introduces students to current issues in the history of psychiatry and some of the major developments in the evolution of this unique medical specialty. the format is class discussion based on themes covered in the course textbook, covering such topics as changing perspectives on the nature of psychotic illness, the psychoneuroses, disorders of the mind/body relationship, psychiatric diagnosis, and presentations of illness. (Joint undergraduate-graduate).

Exclusion: HIS423Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS490H1 - Everyday Stalinism

Hours: 24S

This seminar explores issues of everyday life in Soviet Russia during the Stalin era. What was the Soviet normal? Topics will include belief systems, dreams and myths, terror, fear, repression, and resistance. Texts include a range of different sources, memoirs, diaries, official state documents, and secondary sources.

Recommended Preparation: Any course in Russian history, culture or politics
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS491Y1 - Senior Thesis

Hours: 48S

Students research and write a primary-sourced based thesis of approximately 7,000 words. They attend seminar to provide training in reviewing literature, writing research proposals, formulating hypotheses, oral presentation of findings and constructive critique of other students work. History Specialists & Majors only (priority enrollment for Specialists). Students must find topics and thesis supervisors. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. See department website for prerequisite details and registration instructions.

Prerequisite: Consent of Supervisor and department
Exclusion: HIS476Y1, HIS498H1, HIS499Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS492H1 - Empire & Colonization in the French Atlantic World

Hours: 24S

The first French empire (1604-1791) is typically considered a failed empire. Beginning with the first French exploratory expeditions in the South Atlantic in the mid-16th century, this course examines the social, economic and political history of French imperial expansion during the Ancien régime in order to consider the meaning of success, as applied to empire during this period. The focus is on the development of the two colonial centres of the French New World: New France and the French Caribbean.

Prerequisite: HIS244H1/ HIS294Y1/ ( HIS230H1, HIS231H1)
Recommended Preparation: HIS387H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS493H1 - Humanity in War: The Modern Evolution of the Law of Armed Conflict

Hours: 24S

This course explores the development of international humanitarian law over the course of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Questions asked will include how modern warfare has been understood as a political, cultural, social and legal phenomenon, and the ways in which such perspectives developed into a program of restraint.

Prerequisite: HIS241H1/ HIS242H1/ HIS344H1/ HIS344Y1/ EUR200Y1 or another course in modern history excluding HIS262H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS494H1 - Gandhi's Global Conversations

Hours: 24S

Primary source analysis of global circuits of ethico-political thought via work and life of Gandhi.  Charts transnational environment of Gandhian thought (eg. Ruskin and Tolstoy), its critics (advocates of minority rights, also revolutionary violence) and global afterlife (eg. King, Mandela).  Teaches methods in intellectual and political history of the global.

Prerequisite: HIS282Y1 with a mark of 76% or above
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

HIS495H1 - Topics in History

Previous Course Number: HIS495Y1

Hours: 24S

An in-depth examination of historical issues. Content in any given year depends on instructor. See History website for more details.

Prerequisite: 14.0 credits, including 2.0 HIS credits excluding HIS262H1. Further prerequisites vary from year to year, consult the department.
Recommended Preparation: Varies from year to year
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

HIS495Y1 - Topics in History

Hours: 48S

An in-depth examination of historical issues. Content in any given year depends on instructor. See History website for more details.

Prerequisite: 14.0 credits, including 2.0 HIS credits excluding HIS262H1. Further prerequisites vary from year to year, consult the department.
Recommended Preparation: Varies from year to year
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

HIS496H1 - Topics in History

Hours: 24S

An in-depth examination of historical issues. Content in any given year depends on instructor. See History website for more details.

Prerequisite: 14.0 credits including 2.0 HIS credits. Further prerequisites vary from year to year, consult the department.
Exclusion: Students may not take both L0601 ("Critical Histories of the Black Canadian Experience") and L0701 ("Race in Canada") offered in 2016-17 Fall/Winter.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

HIS497H1 - Animal Politics and Science

Hours: 24S

Why is thinking about the animal unsettling for some or strange for others? Especially since Darwin, the question of the animal-what it says about being or not being human-has been at the core of important philosophical and scientific debates. This course examines the ways that question has been answered over time.

Prerequisite: 1.0 credit in political theory, history of science, or intellectual history. Students who do not meet the prerequisite are encouraged to contact the Department.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HIS498H1 - Independent Studies

History Majors and Specialists only. These courses result in the production of an independent research project. This may not necessarily take the form of a thesis. Students must find topics and project supervisors. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. See department website for specific registration instructions.

Prerequisite: Minimum 80% over 3.0 HIS credits at the 200-level or above
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

HIS499Y1 - Independent Studies

History Majors and Specialists only. These courses result in the production of an independent research project. This may not necessarily take the form of a thesis. Students must find topics and project supervisors. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. See department website for specific registration instructions.

Prerequisite: Minimum 80% over 3.0 HIS credits at the 200-level or above
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

Printer-friendly Version